Movers and shakers

Rebecca Holmes named president and CEO of Colorado Education Initiative

A past CEI awards ceremony (Denver Post file).
Rebecca Holmes (provided by the Colorado Education Initiative).
Rebecca Holmes (provided by the Colorado Education Initiative).

Rebecca Holmes, a former associate state education commissioner with experience working as a teacher and charter school executive, as well as for private foundations and in the private sector, was announced Tuesday as the next president and CEO of the Colorado Education Initiative.

Holmes will take over the role in January, leaving her current position as a senior program officer with the Denver-based Gates Family Foundation.  (The foundation is a financial supporter of Chalkbeat).

“We’re excited that Rebecca is joining the CEI team,” Leroy Williams, the nonprofit group’s board chairman, said in a statement. “Her experienced leadership, vision, and passion for making a difference in Colorado education is contagious — while she understands the dynamics and unique challenges of Colorado’s K-12 public education system. Her wealth of experience and ability to partner and collaborate will be great assets in advancing CEI’s mission to help all students achieve success.”

The Colorado Education Initiative describes itself as an independent nonprofit working with the Colorado Department of Education, educators, schools, districts and others “to accelerate educational improvement and innovation across Colorado.” The organization provides teacher training and supports STEM education, health and wellness programs, and other programs.

CEI has been in leadership flux over the last couple of years. Chief financial officer Sandy Sales has been serving as interim president and CEO since the departure of Glenna Norvelle, who resigned in June after just over a year in the position.

Holmes, who has degrees from Yale and Harvard, started off teaching in Denver, became chief executive officer of the KIPP charter school network’s Colorado schools and also has worked for Deloitte Consulting.

In her state role, Holmes served as associate commissioner for innovation, choice and engagement. She was among a number of high-ranking education department officials who left after the 2015 retirement of former education commissioner Robert Hammond.

Father of TVAAS

William Sanders, pioneer of controversial value-added model for judging teachers, dies

William Sanders, who developed the TVAAS method for measuring a teacher's effect on student performance, died on March 16. Retired since 2013, he had been living in Columbia, Tenn.

William Sanders, the Tennessee statistician and researcher who came up with the nation’s first system for evaluating teachers based on student growth, kicking off a contentious, decades-long debate about how best to measure learning, has died.

Sanders died late last week of natural causes in a hospital in Franklin, Tenn., his family said. He was 74.

A former professor at the University of Tennessee and senior research fellow with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Sanders is best known as the developer of the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System, or TVAAS. That model has become the foundation for judging the effectiveness of teachers in Tennessee public schools, and has been emulated in North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and cities across the nation — playing a key role in one of education reform’s central debates.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen called Sanders’ death “a loss to the education community.”

“During his career, Dr. Sanders made significant contributions to the conversation on how to distinguish our most effective educators in terms of improving academic achievement,” McQueen said in a statement on Monday.

Sanders’ value-added model, also known as the Educational Value-Added Assessment System, became a lightning rod for criticism by many teachers and teachers unions skeptical about whether it yields fair and unbiased estimates.

The model has prompted numerous federal lawsuits charging that the evaluation system, which is now tied to teacher pay and tenure in Tennessee, doesn’t take into account student-level variables such as growing up in poverty. In 2014, the American Statistical Association called its validity into question, and other critics have said TVAAS should not be the sole tool used to judge teachers.

The method measures the effects of a teacher, school or district on student performance by tracking the progress of students against the progress they would be expected to make based on their previous performance. The formula is complex, the method requires a huge database, and the name is a mouthful to say. But the model is meant to show the “value” that was added by each teacher, school or district when measured by the change in student test scores each year.

Sanders’ research soon zeroed in on teachers as the most important part of the equation.

“Determining the effectiveness of individual teachers hold the most promise because, again and again, findings from TVAAS research show teacher effectiveness to be the most important factor in the academic growth of students,” he co-wrote in a 1998 paper. “A component linking teacher effectiveness to student outcomes is a necessary part of any educational evaluation system.”

Sanders went on to become a national leader in policy discussions on value-added assessments.

In his obituary, his family said that Sanders’ findings challenged decades of assumptions that the impact of student family life, income or ethnicity superseded the quality of classroom instruction. That conclusion has been complicated by other research showing that teachers matter more than other aspects of a school, but not as much as outside factors like poverty.

Sanders “stood for a hopeful view that teacher effectiveness dwarfs all other factors as a predictor of student academic growth,” his family said. He believed that “educational influence matters and teachers matter most.”

Growing up on a Tennessee dairy farm, Sanders devoted most of his research to agricultural or wildlife questions at the University of Tennessee until 1981, when he came across a newspaper article suggesting that there was no way to hold teachers accountable based on test scores. He disagreed and wrote the office of then-Gov. Lamar Alexander to say that the effectiveness of teaching could be measured against the rate of student progress.

“Basically, all I was trying to do is [say] here’s the statistical methodology that solves the problem that some of the critics are talking about,” he told Nashville Public Radio in 2014.

The Tennessee Department of Education commissioned his first wave of research beginning in 1982, and Sanders began by looking at student and teacher data in Knox County. He found that he could measure the impact that a teacher had on a student’s trajectory if he tracked that student’s data over time.

The resulting TVAAS methodology linked student academic outcomes to educational evaluation for the first time. Tennessee teachers began using the data in 1997, and their evaluations became tied to the tool under a 2010 state law.

While teachers and teachers unions pushed back, state lawmakers followed the urging of then-Gov. Phil Bredesen, who said changing the way teachers are evaluated would help the state win a $500 million Race to the Top grant, which Tennessee went on to receive.

TVAAS made Sanders a target for some teachers, who felt like he didn’t understand their work and created a system that was used against them unfairly. But colleagues remembered him as a teacher himself who cared about teachers and students.

“Pennsylvania has Bill to thank for changing the conversations about students — from why they can’t achieve to discussions about growing student[s] at all levels,” said Kristin Lewald, who spearheaded the TVAAS counterpart in that state.

mutual agreement

Dan McMinimee to get superintendent’s wages while serving as Jeffco board adviser

PHOTO: Nicholas Garcia
Dan McMinimee at a meeting with Jeffco parents, teachers, and community members after being named finalist for the Jeffco superintendent job.

Dan McMinimee will continue drawing the same salary he did as superintendent of Jeffco Public Schools while serving in an advisory role through the end of his contract.

McMinimee stepped down from leading the state’s second largest district last week after reaching a mutual agreement with the district. He will stay on as an adviser to the board until his contract expires June 30.

In a deal approved at Thursday night’s board meeting, the board and McMinimee agreed his existing contract was modified, not terminated. If the board had decided to break the contract and ask McMinimee to leave earlier, McMinimee would have been owed a year’s worth of salary: $220,000.

McMinimee will continue to earn his regular salary and benefits but will no longer accumulate vacation time. Based on an estimate for what he would be owed in performance-based pay, the district also agreed to pay McMinimee another $27,000 when the contract ends.

The agreement does not provide new details about McMinimee’s advisory role. It states he will be available “for special projects and consideration as needed and to assist the school district with a transition to a new superintendent.”

The board approved the agreement Thursday night without discussion. Board President Ron Mitchell did note at the start of the meeting that McMinimee was not at his usual seat because “his responsibilities have changed.” He also publicly thanked McMinimee for his time leading the district.

The school board also voted Thursday to officially make Terry Elliott, Jeffco’s chief school effectiveness officer, interim superintendent. Elliott was named to serve that role at the same time McMinimee stepped down.

The district did not speak with Elliott about any salary adjustments related to his new role until Friday, said Diana Wilson, a district spokeswoman. Elliott will receive $4,000 per month from March through June in addition to his regular salary, she said.

Elliott only will hold the interim role until the end of June. He will begin a new job in July as principal of a new Brighton high school.

The firm heading up the search for a new superintendent presented findings Thursday of feedback from surveys and focus groups about what the community wants in a new superintendent.

Among the most-frequent responses were someone who can inspire trust, present a positive image of the district and “respond to the challenges presented by an ethnically and culturally diverse community.”