Money to run

Detroit school board candidates rake in thousands from friends, unions — and their own pockets

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
There are 63 candidates angling for seven seats on the new Detroit school board

More than 60 candidates are running for seven seats on the new Detroit school board — and most are running their campaigns on a shoestring.

A Chalkbeat review of state and county campaign finance records shows that just 15 candidates seeking seats on the crucial new board reported receiving campaign contributions as of Oct. 23, the most recent date for which numbers were available.

That includes several candidates who dipped into their personal savings, spending thousands of their own dollars on their campaigns.

The totals suggest that most candidates are going into election day without much of a chance to influence voters in a city-wide race that will define the future for a new district. Board members will be the first locally elected officials to control Detroit schools after years of state-appointed emergency managers — but their campaign spending suggests that most candidates have not had a chance to connect with the nearly 700,000 Detroiters they will represent.

Candidates who have the backing of labor unions, which gave money to candidates in addition to spending thousands on union-led mailings and ads, are likely to have the farthest reach.

Just six candidates raised more than $10,000, including Angelique Peterson-Mayberry who raised the most: $57,980 to pay for radio ads, campaign materials, consulting fees, and yard signs.

Nearly all of Peterson-Mayberry’s funds — $47,500 — came from a political action committee associated with UAW-Ford, the union where she works as the community relations director.

Peterson-Mayberry also benefitted from another $57,500 that the UAW-Michigan PAC reported spending independently to boost her campaign as well as nearly $12,000 that was spent by a PAC connected with the American Federation of Teachers union. The independent expenditures are designed to supplement the spending of the campaign itself.

Here’s a list of other candidates who reported raising funds:

John Telford:

The radio host and retired school superintendent reported raising $31,000 — nearly every penny from himself. A total of $500 came from four other donors.

Sonya Mays:

The CEO of a real estate and housing development nonprofit and a former investment banker reported raising $23,792 including $2,857 from herself and $2,000 from former city emergency manager Kevyn Orr, who she worked with as an advisor during Detroit’s bankruptcy. She also picked up money from two political action committees: $1,000 from a PAC associated with UAW-Michigan and $500 from one associated with the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Penelope Bailer:

The retired former head of Detroit nonprofits reported raising $17,539 including nearly $10,000 from herself and her husband. She also reported receiving $2,000 from political action committees — $1,000 from the UAW-Michigan PAC and $500 each from the Michigan Building and Construction Trades PAC and the Chamber of Commerce PAC.

Mary Kovari:

The former Detroit high school principal reported raising $14,383 including $8,799 from herself — most of which she identified as a loan — and $500 from a PAC associated with the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce, which endorsed her. She says the money she lent to her campaign went to pay attorney fees after an activist tried to get her named removed from the ballot on a technicality.

Leslie Andrews:

The director of community relations and corporate giving at Quicken Loans and Rock Ventures reported raising $14,114 mostly from individual donors including six who gave $1,000 or more. She also picked up $500 from the Chamber of Commerce PAC.

Iris Taylor:

The retired former CEO of Detroit Receiving Hospital reported contributions totaling $10,725 mostly from individuals including from four people who wrote checks of $1,000 or more. She also got $500 from a PAC associated with the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce and benefitted from a nearly $12,000 independent expenditure from the teachers union PAC.

Deborah Hunter-Harvill:

The head of an education consulting firm raised $3,810 including $1,000 from UAW Region 1A. The rest of her contributions came from small individual donors. She also benefitted from a nearly $12,000 independent expenditure from the teachers union PAC.

Kevin Turman:

The pastor of the Second Baptist Church of Detroit reported receiving $5,967 including $1,835 from himself and his wife and a $150 contribution from a political action committee associated with the Miller Canfield lawfirm. The rest was from individual donors.

Phillip Caldwell II:

The former teacher and administrator who now works as an educational consultant reported raising $2,915, mostly from small individual donors.

Herman Davis:

The head of the old DPS school board and a retired personal banker was the sole contributor to his campaign. He reported giving himself $2,141.

Tawanna Simpson:

A member of the old DPS school board, Simpson reported raising $1,200 including $1,000 from the Operating Engineers Local 324 and $100 from the Michigan Democratic Future PAC.

Ida Short:

The vice president of the old DPS school board and a local college professor received $975 in contributions — all from a man named Roger Short.

Ben Washburn:

The retired Wayne County Commission lawyer reported loaning his campaign $500 in cash and spending another $702 of his own money on campaign expenses.

Markiga Meeks:

The clinical lab scientist reported receiving one $100 contribution — from herself.

Two candidates who have not yet reported individual campaign contributions were the beneficiaries of spending by the American Federation of Teachers whose Michigan political action committee reported spending nearly $12,000 on each of the candidates it endorsed including Keith Whitney and Misha Stallworth.

shift

Memphis school leaders pivot on messaging of long-awaited footprint analysis

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
Superintendent Dorsey Hopson speaks Tuesday night during a school board work session for Shelby County Schools.

Since last spring, Superintendent Dorsey Hopson and other top officials with Shelby County Schools have promised a comprehensive footprint analysis to serve as a baseline for guiding future recommendations on school closures.

The idea was to change the piecemeal approach to closing Memphis schools by releasing a thorough examination of data being used to right-size a district with shrinking enrollment and too many school buildings, many of them outdated and expensive to maintain, while also looking at academic performance.

But this week, Hopson said he does not plan to release that full analysis this fall, as he had said earlier. Rather, he’ll make recommendations incrementally based on the data that’s been collected during the last year.

The game plan marks a shift in strategy as leaders of Tennessee’s largest school district begin to roll out proposals to close, build and consolidate schools.

During a work session with school board members on Tuesday night, Hopson called his proposal to consolidate five schools into three new buildings the “first phase” of the footprint analysis.

“The data suggests that we have roughly 15 to 18 schools we should close over the next five years. I will continue to make those recommendations in a responsible and data-driven way,” Hopson said.

The superintendent said after the meeting that this and any subsequent recommendations are the analysis that he’s been promising.

“All we said we’re going to do is get the data and make decisions based on data,” he told reporters. “We’re going to use our enrollment, school performance and the condition of the building.”

Hopson’s statement is a departure from months-long discussions about the footprint analysis in which he and top district officials pointed to the release of its full analysis this fall.

In June, in response to a Chalkbeat story identifying 25 schools at risk of closure based on an analysis of publicly available data, the district issued a statement that said Hopson “will be presenting a comprehensive plan in the fall.” Here is the full statement:

“Shelby County Schools has set ambitious goals for its students and schools through its Destination 2025 priorities, and it has made significant progress towards those goals over the past few years. To continue supporting our students and schools, SCS has initiated an ambitious footprint analysis that will offer the right number of high-quality seats in every neighborhood, better focus resources and attain efficiency by operating the right number of schools. As previously stated, Superintendent Hopson will be presenting a comprehensive plan in the fall that will include a full communications and community engagement effort to ensure that we collaborate with all aspects of our community to benefit our students. Any other reference of potential school closures is speculation and not based on the result of the District’s efforts.”

On Tuesday night, Hopson told reporters: “Chalkbeat did a great article a while back laying out the data. The data was there in terms of how under-enrolled the school was, what’s the school’s performance and things of that nature. So, we’re just looking at that data.” (Chalkbeat’s story identified schools at risk, not proposed for closure.)

Other news organizations also reported statements earlier this year about the district’s plan to unveil a comprehensive plan.

Hopson and several school board members say they’re concerned that releasing the district’s own comprehensive analysis that points to the closure of schools down the road might disrupt those schools prematurely.

“What we know is that if you say this school is slated to close four years from now, you’re going to have a tough time getting teachers, parents leave in droves, and things could change,” Hopson told the school board.

The district has a recent precedent for concern. Last spring, when the board voted to close Northside High School at the end of the 2016-17 school year, all but four of the school’s teachers requested transfers and only 36 students remained enrolled in advance of the planned closure. Faced with a potential mass exodus before Northside’s final year of operation, the board reconsidered its decision and voted to shutter the school in June.

School board member Stephanie Love
PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
Stephanie Love

School board member Stephanie Love acknowledged that Hopson’s plan to release the analysis gradually is a shift, but one that she supports.

“You can’t put all of this out here, especially if you don’t know what’s going to happen,” she said, referring to potential academic gains at low-performing schools and new housing developments that could impact enrollment.

It’s uncertain, however, whether Hopson’s gradual rollout will satisfy county commissioners, who hold the purse strings for schools, including construction projects. Without a comprehensive snapshot of the district’s footprint, some elected officials question whether they can embrace Hopson’s recommendations.

“Analysis shows you where you’re at right now,” said Commissioner Terry Roland. “And (Hopson) also needs a plan on what he’s to do going forward. It’s going to have to be a comprehensive plan in order for us to release funds.”

Commissioner David Reaves said the comprehensive plan doesn’t have to include a list of schools to close, but should give the public an idea of “where do the schools need to be positioned” in the face of declining enrollment.

“We’re going to have to ask how does this fit in the bigger picture,” Reaves said. “We need to see this from a strategic viewpoint.”

Others said an incremental approach is thoughtful and gives the superintendent room to change plans to fit changing circumstances.

Commissioner Walter Bailey, who chairs the panel’s education committee, said he has full confidence in the district’s internal analysis.

“I’m not one to second guess the approach they are taking,” Bailey said. “They’ve got all the information. So I have to rely on their study and their reports that cause them to initiate the effort.”

The school board is scheduled to vote next Tuesday on parts of the first phase of Hopson’s recommendations, with a final vote planned for January or February following public meetings on the proposal.

Teamwork

Who will be advising Indiana’s next state superintendent? Not the charter advocates some expected

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos
Jennifer McCormick

Indiana’s next state superintendent Jennifer McCormick today announced the team of 17 educators and policymakers who will help her prepare to take office in early January — and not one of them is a major player in Indiana’s charter school or voucher scene.

That matters because for much of McCormick’s campaign, critics charged that she would be no different from her Republican predecessors who pushed sweeping changes in the state, shifting resources away from traditional district schools toward charter schools and vouchers for private school tuition.

READ: Find more on this year's races for superintendent, governor and IPS school board.
READ: Find more on this year’s races for superintendent, governor and IPS school board.

McCormick insisted throughout her campaign that she’s not like Tony Bennett, the controversial former Republican superintendent, but those claims were largely dismissed by the state’s staunchest advocates for traditional public schools.

Perhaps until now.

“I am excited and honored to work with such a dynamic and diverse group,” McCormick, said in a statement as she announced her transition team. “The team’s commitment to Hoosier students will drive critical decision-making which will ultimately impact Indiana’s education system and ensure Indiana has one of the best Departments of Education in the nation.”

McCormick’s team includes one Republican lawmaker, several public school administrators, two university professors and a testing expert. Also on the list are community and business leaders as well as educators who work in preschools and with special needs children, among others.

The Institute for Quality Education, a school choice advocacy group that strongly backed McCormick’s campaign, will not have any direct representation on the team.

McCormick’s victory over incumbent Democrat Glenda Ritz was a surprise to many on Election Night. The Yorktown superintendent’s campaign focused on her strengths as an educator and leader following a decades-long career as teacher, principal and administrator.

But she has offered few insights about how she will govern, especially since her policy positions are fairly moderate.

While she’s likely to get along better with Republican lawmakers than Ritz, who spent much of the last four years clashing with the GOP, she’s expressed concerns about some major Republican-led initiatives over the past few years, most notably taxpayer-funded vouchers for private schools that divert money from public schools.

The transition team is her first major act as superintendent-elect, offering Hoosiers their first look at her most important priorities.

Notably missing from the list is anyone from Indianapolis Public Schools — a detail that one school advocate called “unfortunate.”

“What Indianapolis has done is a national model, and so not to have that represented on the transition team seems like an omission,” said David Harris, CEO of The Mind Trust, a pro-charter school Indianapolis-based nonprofit. “IPS right now is also not just at the forefront of the state, but really at the forefront nationally in its work to create innovation network schools, and districts around Indiana would benefit from that perspective.”

Teresa Meredith, president of the Indiana State Teachers Association, said she had been looking forward to seeing who McCormick would pick to assist her since the two talked last week.

“My first reaction was, ‘Wow, this is a really mixed bag of people,’” Meredith said. “I’m glad that she is being really thoughtful in her selections.”

Here’s the full team:

  • Brad Balch: Professor and Dean Emeritus, Indiana State University, Department of Educational Leadership
  • Todd Bess: Executive Director, Indiana Association of School Principals
  • Wes Bruce: Education and assessment consultant who has spent many years with the Indiana Department of Education
  • Jeff Butts: President-Elect, Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents, current superintendent of Wayne Township.
  • Rep. Tony Cook: State Representative, Indiana House of Representatives – District 32, vice chairman of the House Education Committee
  • Denny Costerison: Executive Director, Indiana Association of School Business Officials
  • Scot Croner: Superintendent, Blackford County Schools
  • Steve Edwards (Transition Team Chair): Retired Superintendent and Education Consultant, Administrator Assistance
  • Nancy Holsapple: Executive Director, Old National Trail Special Services Inter-Local
  • David Holt: Chief Financial Officer, MSD Warren Township
  • Lee Ann Kwiatkowski: Member, State Board of Education, assistant superintendent of Warren Township
  • Micah Maxwell: Executive Director, Boys & Girls Club of Muncie
  • Hardy Murphy: Executive Director, Indiana Urban Schools Association and Clinical Professor of Education, IUPUI, IU School of Education
  • Kathryn Raasch: Principal, Wayne Township Preschool
  • Terry Spradlin: Director of Community and Governmental Relations, Education Networks of America
  • Lisa Tanselle: General Counsel, Indiana School Boards Association
  • Kelly Wittman: Executive Principal, Max S. Hayes Career & Technical High School, a public school in Cleveland, Ohio.