Suit

Detroit lawsuit stops just short of accusing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos of bribery

A new lawsuit stops just short of accusing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos of bribery for her role in killing a Detroit education commission last year.

A new lawsuit all but accuses U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos of bribery for her role in influencing Detroit schools legislation last year.

The suit, filed this month by the former Detroit school board and Detroit parents, seeks potentially millions of dollars from the billionaire Michigan philanthropist, asserting that she used campaign contributions to kill a controversial education commission.

“I am not accusing her of bribery,” said lawyer Tom Bleakley, who this month filed the suit in Detroit’s Wayne County Circuit Court. “What I do in all fairness is I set out what she has done and then I give the definition of bribery in the state of Michigan and I contend that it’s up to a jury to draw any reasonable inferences.”

The suit refers to the fierce political battle in Lansing last year over a package of bills that were designed to keep the Detroit Public Schools out of bankruptcy.

Early drafts of the bills would have created a Detroit Education Commission that would have had influence over the opening and closing of district and charter schools in the city.

The commission had broad support from community leaders in Detroit but was strongly opposed by DeVos and some charter school advocates, who feared the commission would favor traditional district schools over charters.

The DeVos-founded Great Lakes Education Project, a political organization, worked aggressively to block the commission.

In the weeks after lawmakers removed the commission from the final bills, the DeVos family poured $1.45 million dollars into the campaign coffers of Republican lawmakers who took her side in the fight — contributions that amounted to $25,000 a day for seven weeks.

“It’s up to a jury to draw any reasonable inference from the amounts as well as the timing of the money and whether it influenced any state officials,” Bleakley said.

A civil suit does not have the authority to charge anyone with a crime such as a bribery. The suit seeks financial damages from DeVos.

The U.S. Education Department did not respond to a request for comment, but Greg McNeilly, who is a member of the Great Lakes Education Project board, called the suit a “publicity stunt” that is taking advantage of DeVos’s new position as education secretary.

The actions alleged in the suit all occurred months before President Trump was elected and chose DeVos as his top education official.

“Some people are still upset that they weren’t able to create a rigged and politically corrupt system, which is what the Detroit Education Commission proposal was,” McNeilly said. “It would have further harmed students.”

The former school board that brought the suit is the 11-member elected body that was largely powerless during much of the last decade as the city schools were run by state-appointed emergency managers. The board filed unsuccessful challenges last year after the Detroit legislation passed, creating a new school district called the Detroit Public Schools Community District. The new district is run by a new seven-member board that was elected last fall. Just one member of the old board was elected to the new board.

The old board filed a number of lawsuits during the emergency manager era, from 2009 until 2016, mostly challenging the emergency manager law.

The latest suit is the first from the board that names DeVos as a defendant. Also named are state officials, including Gov. Rick Snyder.

The suit accuses the state of under-funding special education in Detroit and seeks to block language that allows Detroit schools — but no other Michigan districts — to hire uncertified teachers. Snyder’s office declined to comment.

Read the suit here and a brief supporting it here.

 

 

change at the top

Warning of ‘inconsistency at the top,’ Detroit school administrators, teachers urge board to reconsider Meriweather

Interim Superintendent Alycia Meriweather is not among finalists in the running to be Detroit's permanent district superintendent.

Even as the Detroit Public Schools Community District moves forward with planning day-long interviews for the three finalists in the running to be Detroit’s next superintendent, supporters of the woman currently in the top job have continued to push her case.

After the Detroit school board announced over the weekend that Interim Superintendent Alycia Meriweather was not among finalists for the permanent position, ten top district administrators signed a letter urging the board to keep their current boss in the running.

“Our district has endured an enormous amount of change in leadership over the past 10 years,” the administrators wrote, adding that the district has “succumbed to the dictates of 5 emergency managers and have finally returned to local control.”

The letter calls on the board to give Meriweather a formal interview noting that district leadership has “seen up close and personal the detriment of inconsistency at the top.”

The administrators are part of an effort that was joined Wednesday by the city teachers union, which released a statement urging the board to consider Meriweather. Hundreds of her supporters have also signed a petition.

The board has three finalists scheduled for 12-hour interviews that will include school visits, parent meetings and public questioning by the board.

Orlando Ramos, a regional superintendent for the Milwaukee Public Schools is scheduled for an interview on March 29th. Nikolai Vitti, the superintendent of the Duval County Public Schools in Jacksonville, Fla., is scheduled for April 3. And Derrick Coleman, who is superintendent of the River Rouge district, is scheduled for April 5.

Board President Iris Taylor said the board has no plans to add a fourth candidate to the mix.

“We have a process that we’ve established and that we’ve agreed upon and we’re going to continue to follow that process,” she said.

Meriweather’s interim contract continues until June 30. She says she intends to stay focused on the job until then but wouldn’t comment this week on whether she’ll plan to stay with the district under a new superintendent.

Here’s the letter from district leaders that was signed by top district administrators including the district’s Deputy Superintendent of Finance and Operations Marios Demetriou, its Executive Director of Enrollment Steve Wasko and several district network leaders:

Looking ahead

Despite being passed over for top job, Alycia Meriweather says she’s focused on changes ahead for Detroit schools

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
Interim Superintendent Alycia Meriweather addresses parents and teachers at Bethune Elementary-Middle School on Detroit's west side about the school's return to the district.

When Interim Superintendent Alycia Meriweather and other top officials from the Detroit Public Schools Community District arrived in the auditorium of Bethune Elementary-Middle School on Tuesday afternoon, their goal was to calm frayed nerves.

Bethune is among 11 schools that will be returning to the main Detroit district this summer after five years in the state-run Education Achievement Authority and district officials have been making the rounds of returning schools, promising a smooth transition.

“I wanted to come to each of these meetings personally to make sure that we clearly communicate that DPSCD is excited to have our family back,” Meriweather told Bethune parents and teachers, vowing that the district would “move everyone back into the family and move the whole family toward excellence.”

But even as Meriweather rallied the troops at the school on Detroit’s west side, her hopeful predictions about the future struck an odd note just days after the Detroit school board narrowed its superintendent search to three finalists that did not include Meriweather.

The interim superintendent’s exclusion from the search process has triggered angry reactions on social media. Hundreds of people have signed a petition urging the school board to reconsider. And on Wednesday, the union representing Detroit teachers called on the board to give Meriweather a shot.

“During her tenure, Interim Superintendent Meriweather has led the way in restoring trust, confidence and hope in our school district,” the Detroit Federation of Teachers wrote in a Facebook post. “She has earned an opportunity for further consideration.”

Board President Iris Taylor did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Meriweather had applied for the permanent position but said her elimination won’t change her focus between now and the end of her contract in June.

“What I’m committed to right now is through June 30th and making sure that we move this district forward,” Meriweather said. “My hope is the same hope I had when I took the interim position, which is that every piece of work that I have done in the last year will be good enough to keep moving forward no matter who sits in this seat.”

Several Bethune parents and teachers said knowing that Meriweather is leaving adds another layer of uncertainty to the already daunting prospect of their school returning to the district, but Meriweather said most of the transition details will be addressed before she leaves.

She told the parents and teachers in the Bethune auditorium that EAA teachers will get letters next week promising them that they can remain in their current positions as long as they’re certified and not rated “ineffective.” What they will be paid, however, will be the subject of ongoing negotiations between the district and the city teachers union because many EAA teachers make more than their district counterparts.

Parents who want to keep their children in their current EAA schools can do so without having to deal with extra paperwork, Meriweather said, adding that the district is committed to maintaining continuity.

“I wanted you to hear straight from me: Who I am, who we are and where we’re going,” Meriweather said. “We’re excited to have you back and I really look forward to this transition and making it as smooth as possible.”

Despite the superintendent search news, Meriweather has kept up her schedule of events and community meetings this week. Her signature is on the lawsuit the district just filed opposing state plans to shutter 16 district schools.

She will be the one negotiating a “partnership” with the state education department that is intended to keep those 16 schools open as well as eight EAA schools that were also on the closure list, she said.

The school board is moving ahead with scheduling interviews with the three men who were named as finalists: Orlando Ramos, a regional superintendent for the Milwaukee Public Schools; Nikolai Vitti, the superintendent of the Duval County Public Schools in Jacksonville, Fla.; and Derrick Coleman, who is superintendent of the River Rouge district.

All three will go through a 12-hour interview process that will include school visits and parent meetings as well as a public interview with the board, the district announced Wednesday. Ramos’ interview is scheduled for March 29th, Vitti’s for April 3 and Coleman’s for April 5.

Asked whether she intends to remain with the district under a new superintendent, Meriweather declined to answer.

“At this point, I’m going to say no comment,” she said.