reading list

Weekend Reads: Why childhood disadvantages hurt young boys more than girls

Preschoolers at McGlone Academy.
  • A new poll suggests that a large majority of Americans think that the country should do more to expand access to early childhood and a plurality think we should invest more in early learning than in college. (The Atlantic)
  • A decade after the first state run school district was started in Louisiana, the track record for existing turnaround districts is mixed, but more may be on the way. (Hechinger Report)
  • New research suggests that childhood disadvantages such as poverty or an unstable family life hurt boys more than girls. (The Upshot)
  • The flap over language a McGraw Hill textbook used that described slaves as “workers” reveals larger problems with the way history is taught in American classrooms. (The Atlantic)
  • In their latest philanthropic effort in education, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, former teacher Priscilla Chan, are opening a private school aimed at counteracting the toll that poverty takes on children. (San Jose Mercury News)
  • For many first-year teachers, October and November are the hardest months, but some programs are working to get teachers through the fall rough patch. (NPR Ed)
  • Sesame Street’s new puppet character with autism is unusual because she’s a girl, a decision that the show’s creators made intentionally to combat impressions that most kids with autism are boys. (L.A. Times)
  • If you didn’t already know that education-only news outlets do amazing reporting, the story of how Catalyst Chicago broke open the story that eventually led to the former Chicago schools chief pleading guilty to fraud charges should give you an idea. (Columbia Journalism Review

reading list

Weekend Reads: ‘Love and love hard,’ a KIPP Tulsa teacher tells us all

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
  • New Haven’s schools chief has fallen out of favor after seven years there, and now he’s looking to leave. (N.H. Independent)
  • The KIPP charter network urged its schools to act after Terence Crutcher, a KIPP dad, was killed by police in Tulsa. (Chalkbeat)
  • What that action looked like at KIPP Tulsa College Prep, where at least 10 students are related to Crutcher. (Tulsa World)
  • A teacher at the school went viral after sharing her experiences talking to students — and her advice to “love and love hard.” (Facebook)
  • Great teachers are experts at having hard conversations. Here’s their advice to America. (Chalkbeat)
  • One of Nevada’s wealthiest women is also the state’s glamorous board of education president. (Pacific Standard)
  • Two seasoned education policy wonks are leading Donald Trump’s education transition planning. (Politics K-12)
  • Why is Tennessee’s first single-sex charter school thriving? Not for the reason you might think. (The Atlantic)
  • Efforts are underway to improve black students’ experience at a diverse school where they still come out behind. (Bloomberg)

reading list

Weekend Reads: Why Texas stopped students with disabilities from getting the help they need

PHOTO: Alan Petersime
  • A story about school choice in Philadelphia didn’t mention race drew criticism from Nikole Hannah-Jones (and others). (Billy Penn)
  • What KIPP did after it realized how many graduates were dropping out of college has changed the conversation about success. (Chalkbeat)
  • Texas has systematically prevented children with disabilities from getting the help they’re legally entitled to, according to a new investigation. (Houston Chronicle)
  • An exit interview with Kaya Henderson, the chief who took D.C. schools from “dead” to cracking down on families faking addresses to get in. (Scholastic)
  • Watch this video to get up speed on the Common Core standards and why they’re still under fire. (EdWeek)
  • A coach speaks directly, and encouragingly, to a student whose teacher sees him as a problem. (Education Post)
  • What Donald Trump is really saying when he says he’d create home-school vouchers for poor kids. (Slate)
  • A new study found that the greatest determinant of police surveillance in schools is the presence of students of color. (The Atlantic)
  • Catch up on the last year — and century — in Detroit schools, one of the few places where police seem to be visible in that city. (Harpers)
  • Among the details in a lawsuit challenging the quality of education in Detroit: condoms on the floor and teachers without training. (Chalkbeat)