From the Statehouse

Lawmaker who called for ISTEP test’s death now calling to extend its life

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos
Lawmakers and educators discuss issues likely to come up during the 2017 legislative session.

It’s been just nine months since Indiana lawmakers voted to get rid of the state’s hated ISTEP exam — and they’re already planning to keep it on life support.

Rep. Bob Behning, the Indianapolis Republican who championed the so-called “kill ISTEP” bill last spring, today said the state might extend its contract with the company that made this year’s ISTEP for one or two years.

That would mean ISTEP could remain largely unchanged beyond 2017, when the test was supposed to be given for the last time.

Read all our coverage of ISTEP and other testing issues here.

Extending ISTEP’s life might not be ideal given the complaints about the test’s history of scoring glitches and delays, but Behning said the state needs more time to create a viable ISTEP replacement.

“If you start looking at timelines, I don’t know how you get around it,” Behning said. “Expecting to have an new assessment in place by … May (2018) is to me, rushing it, and not in the best interests of students.”

Behning’s remarks came at an annual legislative conference today where lawmakers gathered to discuss issues on the legislature’s agenda for the session that begins in January.

The “Kill ISTEP” bill called for lawmakers to vote this session on a new test to measure Indiana students.

They had appointed a committee of lawmakers and educators who offered their final recommendations earlier this month. The recommendations largely called for tweaks to the test rather than a total overhaul, but legislature is not bound by the recommendations.

Behning said he expects the legislature to proceed with voting this session on a new exam, but that exam won’t likely be administered until 2019 or 2020.

That follows the recommendation of test experts who urged the state to take its time to make sure the new test is done right.

Pearson, the British-based company that has the state’s current testing contract, is not responsible for the problematic 2015 test, but ISTEP critics who were hoping for a new exam will likely be disappointed to see the company’s contract continued.

early adopters

Here are the 25 districts committing to taking TNReady online this spring

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

One year after Tennessee’s first attempt at online testing fizzled, 25 out of 140 Tennessee school districts have signed up to try again.

Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday the number is what she expected as districts prepare to administer the state’s TNReady assessment in April.

Although all districts will make the switch to online testing by 2019 for middle and high school students, they had the option to forge ahead this year with their oldest students.

The Department of Education is staggering its transition to online testing — a lesson learned last year when most of the state tried to do it all at once and the online platform buckled on the first day. As a result, the department fired its testing company, derailing the state’s assessment program, and later hired  Questar as its new test maker.

Districts piloted Questar’s online platform last fall, and had until Wednesday to decide whether to forge ahead with online testing for their high school students this spring or opt for paper-and-pencil tests.

McQueen announced the state’s new game plan for TNReady testing in January and said she is confident that the new platform will work.

While this year was optional for high schools, all high schools will participate in 2018. Middle and elementary schools will make the switch in 2019, though districts will have the option of administering the test on paper to its youngest students.

Districts opting in this spring are:

  • Alvin C. York Institute
  • Bedford County
  • Bledsoe County
  • Blount County
  • Bristol City
  • Campbell County
  • Cannon County
  • Cheatham County
  • Clay County
  • Cocke County
  • Coffee County
  • Cumberland County
  • Grundy County
  • Hamilton County
  • Hancock County
  • Knox County
  • Jackson-Madison County
  • Moore County
  • Morgan County
  • Putnam County
  • Scott County
  • Sullivan County
  • Trousdale County
  • Washington County
  • Williamson County

power players

Who’s who in Indiana education: Sen. Dennis Kruse

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos and Sarah Glen

Find more entries on education power players as they publish here.

Vitals: Republican representing District 14 and parts of Allen and Dekalb counties. So far, has served 13 years in the Senate (current) and 15 years in the House. Kruse began his career as a teacher in 1970, spending five years in the classroom. Once he left education, he became an auctioneer and got involved in real estate.

What he’s known for: Kruse has served as Senate Education Committee chairman for eight years. While he is a less vocal advocate for choice-based education reform measures than his House counterpart, Kruse is a staunch conservative who has pushed — with varying levels of success — for incorporating more religion in public schools.

Career highlights: In 2011, Kruse was the author of Senate Bill 1, a massive bill that established the state’s formal teacher evaluation system. He has also consistently supported bills seeking to improve school discipline, before- and after-school programs and teacher preparation. This year, Kruse has authored bills dealing with school start dates, contracts for district superintendents, school employee background checks and testing.

On religion in schools: Kruse and fellow Sen. Jeff Raatz introduced a resolution this year that, according to the National Center for Science Education, has the “teaching of evolution” as “the specific target of the bill.” Previously, Kruse has put forward other legislation that would encourage the teaching of creationism and the recitation of the Lord’s Prayer at the start of the school day, but none of the bills passed. In 2015, Kruse was also a co-author of the controversial religious freedom bill.

On toeing the party line: Despite his conservative politics, Kruse doesn’t always line up with the will of his party. Republican leaders this year are calling for making the state superintendent an appointed, rather than elected, position, but Kruse won’t back the switch. Instead, Kruse has said he believes in elections and that people should get to make choices about their representation.

For that reason, some have speculated that’s why the senate’s version of the bill bypassed his education committee and instead was heard through the elections committee.

Who supports him: Kruse has received campaign contributions from Hoosiers for Quality Education, an advocacy group that supports school choice, charter schools and vouchers; K12, one of the largest online school providers in the country; and Education Networks of America, a private education technology company.

Legislative highlights via Chalkbeat:

Bills in past years: 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Also check out our list of bills to watch this year.