Funding fight

Trump has threatened to cut federal funding to New York City. Here are the education programs that could take a hit.

PHOTO: RJ Sangosti/Denver Post

Less than 24 hours after Mayor Bill de Blasio assured reporters that the city’s budget was crafted “with the assumption of profound challenges from Washington,” President Donald Trump announced a major one: threatening to strip billions of federal dollars from New York City.

An executive order he signed last week — which would withhold funding from “sanctuary cities” like New York — could have a direct effect on the $1.7 billion in education funding the city is expecting from the federal government in fiscal year 2018, roughly 8 percent of the education department’s overall budget.

Legal experts have argued Trump’s order is patently unconstitutional, questions loom about how much funding the president can actually withhold, and de Blasio has vowed to fight it. But education advocates said that even marginal funding reductions could harm the city’s most vulnerable students.

“The loss of funding would have a devastating impact on schools,” said Randi Levine, policy director at Advocates for Children. “The city relies on federal funding to support students with disabilities, students who are homeless, and students from low-income backgrounds.”

City and education department officials did not make budget experts available for comment, but the Independent Budget Office has identified which education programs receive the largest shares of federal funding.

Here are the ones that could be most affected:

Title I

With the city expecting roughly $709 million in direct federal funding and grants through Title I, losing that budget line would represent the biggest single potential blow to New York City’s education department. A recent analysis by the United Federation of Teachers found that decimating the program, which boosts schools that serve higher proportions of low-income students, could lead to reductions in funding at 1,265 schools (there are nearly 1,800 in the city), and cuts to after-school programs.

Free and reduced price lunch

Almost 90 percent of city spending on food programs comes from the federal government, largely through its free and reduced price lunch program, according to the most recent data released by the IBO. Roughly 80 percent of the city’s students qualify for meal assistance, and in his most recent budget proposal, de Blasio is banking on just over $300 million in federal support for the program.

Support for teachers and disadvantaged students

Nearly half of what the city spends on “instructional support” comes from the federal government, according to the IBO.

That broad category includes professional development and programs that improve teacher quality ($108 million), along with funding stemming from federal laws guaranteeing students with disabilities access to an appropriate education ($270 million). The city is also banking on $34 million from the feds to support immigrant students.

Vocational training and programs supporting homeless students

The federal government also has a smaller role in a number of other programs: career and technical high schools ($14 million), for instance, and education for homeless youth ($1.5 million).

Those might seem like trivial amounts of money in the context of a multibillion-dollar budget, Advocates for Children’s Levine acknowledged. But with the city facing other potentially significant cuts under the executive order, local officials may have to make difficult decisions about funding priorities.

“It will be harder to hold onto the education dollars we have,” Levine said, “because the city will be trying to fill all these other gaps.”

audit findings

Audit finds educational services lacking at Rikers Island, but corrections officials dispute report

PHOTO: Matt Green/Flickr

Corrections officials “systemically neglected” to ensure that young adult inmates knew they could enroll in school courses, according to an audit released Tuesday by Comptroller Scott Stringer. The audit also found that the city Department of Education failed to put mandated educational plans in place for incarcerated students with disabilities.

“That’s wrong, because if we’re going to reverse decades of backwards criminal justice policies, it’s going to be with bigger and better schools — not bigger and tougher prisons,” Stringer said in an emailed statement. “We have to do better.”

But officials from the city Department of Correction disputed the findings, and a response from the education department suggests the audit takes a narrow approach that misses “critical context.”

In 74 percent of sampled cases, the comptroller’s office couldn’t find evidence that inmates between the ages of 18 and 21 attended an orientation and were informed of their right to attend classes. In 68 percent of the sampled cases, auditors could not find required forms from inmates either accepting or rejecting educational services. In its response to the findings, a representative for the corrections department noted that some inmates may simply “refuse to sign the form.”

The corrections department wrote that it “disputes the overall finding” that inmates are not informed of their right to educational services. Furthermore, the audit “failed to capture” additional steps the department takes to do so.

In responses to the findings, included in the audit, corrections and education officials said all eligible students are offered the opportunity to attend classes. Every school day, the education department prints a list of eligible students who are in facilities with school programs, and the list is shared with corrections staff in the housing areas. Inmates who are interested can attend an information session and enroll immediately.

The corrections department’s response also states that inmates receive a handbook that includes information about enrolling in classes, and that signs are posted in common areas to inform inmates of their right to request educational services. Furthermore, the department conducts regular focus groups to create alternative programs of interest to young offenders who choose not to go to school, according to the response.

The audit also found that 48 percent of eligible students did not have a Special Education Plan, based on their Individualized Education Program, created for them within 30 days of beginning classes, as required. Those plans were never created for 36 percent of sample students, according to the audit.

The Department of Education responded that it is working to implement a new electronic system to track progress on education plans for students with disabilities, and that students who had such plans before being incarcerated continue to get the services they need.

The audit does note that all 16- and 17-year olds were receiving the educational services required by law. Those students have to attend school, whether they are incarcerated or not. Older students are eligible to receive educational services if they are under 21 years of age, have not already earned a high school diploma and will be incarcerated for 10 or more days.

Community voices

Memphians weigh in on Hopson’s investment plan for struggling schools

PHOTO: Marta W. Aldrich
Superintendent Dorsey Hopson speaks Monday night to about 175 educators, parents and students gathered to learn about Shelby County Schools' plan to make new investments in struggling schools

After years of closing struggling schools, Shelby County Schools is changing course and preparing to make investments in them, beginning with 19 schools that are challenged by academics, enrollment, aging buildings and intergenerational poverty.

This May, 11 of those schools will receive “treatment plans” tailored to their needs and based on learnings from the Innovation Zone, the district’s 5-year-old school turnaround initiative. The other eight schools already are part of a plan announced last fall to consolidate them into three new buildings.

Superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Chief of Schools Sharon Griffin talked up the new dynamic Monday night during a community meeting attended by about 175 educators, parents and students. In his proposed budget for next school year, Hopson has set aside $5.9 million to pay for supports for the 11 schools dubbed “critical focus” schools. 


Here’s the framework for the changes and which schools will be impacted.


Monday’s gathering was first in which Memphians got to publicly weigh in on the district’s new game plan. Here’s what several stakeholders had to say:

Quinterious Martin

Quinterious Martin, 10th-grader at Westwood High School:

“It really helped me to hear that the label of ‘critical’ is going to help us out, not pull us down. I was worried when I first heard our school would be on the list of critical schools, but I get it now. The point is to help the schools out, not make them feel worse. To me, one thing Westwood really needs is more classes to get us ready for our future careers, like welding or mechanics. My commitment tonight was to always improve in what I do.”

Deborah Calvin, a teacher at Springdale Elementary School:

“I enjoyed the presentation tonight. I think it’s so important to know everyone is on the same page. The plan will only be successful if everyone in the community is aware of what the goals are. I think they made it really clear tonight that just more money doesn’t help turn a school. It takes a lot of community support. We really need more parent involvement at Springdale. Children need support when they go home. They need someone to sit down with them and work through homework or read.”

Catherine Starks, parent at Trezevant High School:

“Honestly, I think this is just going through the motions and something to keep parents quiet. Some schools may be getting the supports they need, but not all of them are. Trezevant is one that is not. … We need good leadership and we need someone to be advocates for our kids. I want to see the kids at our school get the support they need from the principal, the guidance counselor, the superintendent. Trezevant has had negative everything, but now we need some positive attention. And we really need the community to step up.”

Neshellda Johnson and daughter Rhyan

Neshellda Johnson, fourth-grade teacher at Hawkins Mill Elementary School:

“Hawkins Mill has been in the bottom 5 percent for awhile and has been targeted (for takeover) by the state for about four consecutive years. …  It’s refreshing to see that, instead of putting us on the chopping block, the district is looking to actually invest in us and give us the tools we need so we can continue to have growth. … I’m looking to the district for academic supports with regards to reading, more teachers assistants, more time for teaching and less time for testing, and more after-school and summer enrichment programs. And in addition to supports for our students, I’m hopeful there will be supports offered for our parents. We have a need for mental health and counseling services in our area.”

You can view the district’s full presentation from Monday night below: