Zimmerman_Photo.0.jpg

Alex Zimmerman

Reporter, Chalkbeat New York

Alex Zimmerman joined the Chalkbeat team in 2016. Before that, he was a staff writer at the Pittsburgh City Paper and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, Village Voice, Vice and Atlas Obscura. Alex can be reached at azimmerman@chalkbeat.org.

Most New York City high schools don’t have papers, and there are wide disparities in newspaper access across the city by race, geography, and poverty status.
In October alone, there were nearly 14,500 school bus delays, lasting 41 minutes on average.
“For some students, going back to a building for a full day just didn’t feel like it was for them anymore,” the school’s principal said.
Suspensions have fallen 64% over the past decade, though troubling racial disparities remain.
The proposals would require either new funding or significant cuts to some campuses, both of which would likely face political hurdles.
Schools Chancellor David Banks blamed problems with payments on the previous administration.
Many of the students are asylum seekers who have arrived recently from South American countries.
Of the city’s 478 middle schools, 59 will select at least some portion of next year’s incoming sixth graders based on their fourth grade marks. That’s down from 196 before the pandemic.
The schedule obtained by Chalkbeat reveals who had the chancellor’s ear as he began navigating his first job running a school system.
Chancellor Banks said students who work “really hard” should have priority access compared with “the child you have to throw water on their face to get them to go to school every day.”
Officials said the proposals will be reviewed by the chancellor and there will be opportunities for feedback by parent councils this winter.
NYC promised universal air conditioning by 2022. Dozens of educators, students, and parents told Chalkbeat that gaps in coverage remain.
New York state officials gave districts the green light to release test results in reading and math — but statewide figures won’t be released until later.
The move has prompted mixed reactions from educators and parents.
Schools Chancellor David Banks’ comments prompted multiple City Council members to grill officials about the department’s plans on Wednesday.
Even as New York City required students to return to in-person instruction last school year, hundreds of thousands of children missed large stretches of instruction, new figures show.
About 3,000 students at 59 schools — generally rising juniors and seniors — will be selected by employers for apprenticeships paying from $15 to $25 an hour.
New York City schools will cap kindergarten to third grade classes at 20 students, grades 4-8 at 23 students, and most high school classes at 25 students.
Mayor Eric Adams and his schools chief David Banks made no secret of their top priority for the new school year: improving how schools teach children how to read.
Educators, parents, and students: Does your classroom have air conditioning?
Summer Rising has brought fun camp-like activities, along with academics, to about 110,000 elementary and middle school students.
Dozens of advocacy groups are raising the alarm that restorative justice funding is “at risk” — including a planned expansion of restorative justice programs to all middle and high schools.
City officials have not yet shared what COVID safety measures will be in place next school year or what the city’s testing strategy might be.
“All this money that is meant for the kids in our public schools are going to private schools,” Chancellor Banks said. “Folks have figured out how to game this system.”
The court’s order brings whiplash to back-to-school planning. Four days prior, a lower court ruled the city needed to redo the education department budget.