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Alex Zimmerman

Reporter, Chalkbeat New York

Alex Zimmerman joined the Chalkbeat team in 2016. Before that, he was a staff writer at the Pittsburgh City Paper and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, Village Voice, Vice and Atlas Obscura. Alex can be reached at azimmerman@chalkbeat.org.

Dozens of advocacy groups are raising the alarm that restorative justice funding is “at risk” — including a planned expansion of restorative justice programs to all middle and high schools.
City officials have not yet shared what COVID safety measures will be in place next school year or what the city’s testing strategy might be.
“All this money that is meant for the kids in our public schools are going to private schools,” Chancellor Banks said. “Folks have figured out how to game this system.”
The court’s order brings whiplash to back-to-school planning. Four days prior, a lower court ruled the city needed to redo the education department budget.
The decision is more complicated than meets the eye, and either choice involves some trade-offs.
The decision keeps in place an order temporarily blocking the education department from moving forward with hundreds of millions of dollars of cuts to school budgets.
XQ is supporting new robotics and design-themed high schools, the city’s new virtual academies, and three other projects.
The plan calls for helping families access care more easily, expanding services to reach 41,000 more children.
Even schools that prided themselves on using restorative justice to address students’ needs struggled to pick up where they left off before the pandemic.
Department officials plan to hire 200 coaches for grades K-5, down from roughly 500 coaches focusing on grades K-2 in prior years
The SEED program aims to help students who have sensory issues that are “dramatically impacting their school performance.”
‘I believe that virtual learning is here to stay whether or not we have a pandemic’ schools Chancellor David Banks says.
About 57% of high school students are vaccinated, so the move will significantly increase the share of students who are eligible to attend.
Both Banks and Adams have signaled greater support for charter schools, but Banks’ addition to the charter school center board is not all that unusual.
Schools issued about 16% fewer suspension from July through December 2021 compared to the same period in 2019 before the pandemic hit.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
City officials warned that the PEP’s failure to approve the funding formula could delay funding to schools.
“By not having a full board it kind of gives a message that it’s not a priority,” said Lori Podvesker, a former panel member.
The delays could discourage some therapists from signing up for similar programs, complicating future efforts to provide extra help to students with disabilities.
“What we’re talking about today is the educational equivalent of long COVID,” Bloomberg said. “The good news is we know how to treat it.”