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Amy Zimmer

Bureau Chief, Chalkbeat New York

Amy Zimmer is the bureau chief for Chalkbeat New York. She is an award-winning journalist who previously covered education for the New York news site DNAinfo. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Metro newspaper, and City Limits, among other outlets. Her book, “Meet Miss Subways,” focused on one of the nation’s first integrated beauty contests. She also led content strategy at the tech startup Localize.city. Amy received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Yale and has a master’s in journalism from New York University.

Doubling the New York Harbor School’s footprint on Governors Island will allow it to offer its maritime and environmental curriculum to more students.
Michael Pantone, one of this year’s Big Apple Award winners, teaches theater to students with disabilities at a Brooklyn school in District 75.
Eric Adams is making literacy a priority. Chalkbeat convened a panel, including educators and other experts, to find out what it will take to change the system.
The court’s order brings whiplash to back-to-school planning. Four days prior, a lower court ruled the city needed to redo the education department budget.
Ruling that New York City’s education budget process violated the law, a Manhattan judge ordered the city to redo this year’s education department budget. For now, school budgets revert to last year’s levels.
Parents are rallying to save five school-based health clinics operated by SUNY Downstate, which serve 10 schools.
To help address the exodus of women from the workforce, New York state is using federal money for a grant program to start new child care programs in areas lacking enough options.
Anyone 18 years old or younger is eligible for free lunch and breakfast this summer at more than 300 schools, pools and parks across the city.
But like most things within the nation’s largest school district, what happens across New York City’s 1,600 schools often varies school to school and even classroom to classroom.
A growing number of educators are embracing the practice, popularized by Christopher Emdin, giving students a bigger say in shaping their learning.
Students who pass their course this year but fail or miss a Regents exam due to illness, injury or quarantine, could still earn a diploma under a new state proposal.
Families and educators can’t plan for next year without answers to some important questions.
Anxiety, depression, and chronic absenteeism are on the rise as many students and parents struggle with school refusal after prolonged campus closures during COVID.
Comfort dogs are helping NYC students in literacy, math, and social-emotional learning during a challenging school year.
Of nearly 270 NYC elementary schools offering programs, only fewer than 30 still had openings as of Monday afternoon.
The Muslim holy month is 10 days earlier next year and could overlap again with state tests, families worry.
The state’s English exams kick off Tuesday for grades 3-8. NYC schools Chancellor David Banks believes that too much test prep has led students to disengage and even drop out.
Parents in New York City schools’ “Family Healing Ambassadors” program are working to address mental health needs at their schools through workshops and peer-to-peer support.
Nearly 15,000 NYC students are home schooling this year, up about 88% since the pandemic hit. The city’s highest poverty districts saw the biggest growth in home school students.
Chalkbeat created a flow chart to help families in NYC schools navigate the city’s new test-to-stay and quarantine policies when someone tests positive for COVID.
John Dewey High School hopes to grow its new teaching academy and eventually have student teachers work in a middle school to be built next door.
At Bronx International High School, Vanessa Spiegel is teaching students to grow fresh produce for themselves and to help fight food insecurity in their community.