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Amy Zimmer

Bureau Chief, Chalkbeat New York

Amy Zimmer is the Bureau Chief for Chalkbeat New York. She is an award-winning journalist who previously covered education for the New York news site DNAinfo. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Metro newspaper, and City Limits, among other outlets. Her book, “Meet Miss Subways,” focused on one of the nation’s first integrated beauty contests. She also led content strategy at the tech startup Localize.city. Amy received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Yale and has a master’s in journalism from New York University.

M.S. 51 principal Neal Singh will leave to work for District 15’s superintendent. Pui-Lam (Jack) Chan, from New Utrecht High School, will take over on Feb. 1 as interim principal.
Chalkbeat wants to hear from you. How has your relationship with your school community changed since the roller coaster ride of campus closures and openings?
New York City’s education department pulled three proposals to co-locate Success Academy elementary schools in shared campuses after locals mounted campaigns to fight the plans.
Queens teacher Thomas Gelardi’s YouTube channel took off during the COVID pandemic. He’s garnered more than 4 million views on his videos that help kids stay active in small spaces.
Kindergarten families can activate their NYC Scholarship Accounts in January. Here’s how to grow the $100 seed money and how communities can raise more money to help kids go to college.
The education department told principals the Situation Room will close Dec. 23. Schools will no longer have to send families letters about positive COVID cases.
As winter approaches, education department officials are recommending that students and staff wear masks inside school buildings, according to a message to families on Tuesday.
The education department extended the deadline for middle and high school admissions to Dec. 5 after MySchools crashed the night before applications were due.
Just 17% of New York City schools were meeting the education department’s Computer Science for All equity goals of reaching girls, Latinos, and Black students, according to a recent report from NYU’s Research Alliance.
Sarah Slack, a science teacher at Brooklyn’s I.S. 223, won the prestigious Math for America Muller Award for her work on bolstering climate education across New York City.
Chalkbeat talked to educators and others in schools about the storm’s other lasting legacies — from strengthening bonds to creating community to efforts to improve safety.
“Focus on selecting a school that is a good fit for your student and not whether it’s a ‘good school’ or not,” one expert said.
Eighth graders with course grades in the top 15% of their class last year will have priority in scoring seats at some of NYC’s most selective high schools.
Under New York’s Open Meetings Law, school board meetings must return in person, with an option for hybrid.
It was the first time since 2005 that no public school run by NYC’s education department received the honor.
Families across the five boroughs are already mounting letter-writing campaigns and petitions for and against schools that use screens for admissions.
What’s happening with the budget? How will schools address mental health? What impact will COVID have this year?
Chalkbeat wants to hear from students, parents, and educators: What are you looking forward to this school year? What are your hopes? Concerns?
Summer Rising has brought fun camp-like activities, along with academics, to about 110,000 elementary and middle school students.
Doubling the New York Harbor School’s footprint on Governors Island will allow it to offer its maritime and environmental curriculum to more students.
Michael Pantone, one of this year’s Big Apple Award winners, teaches theater to students with disabilities at a Brooklyn school in District 75.
Eric Adams is making literacy a priority. Chalkbeat convened a panel, including educators and other experts, to find out what it will take to change the system.
The court’s order brings whiplash to back-to-school planning. Four days prior, a lower court ruled the city needed to redo the education department budget.
Ruling that New York City’s education budget process violated the law, a Manhattan judge ordered the city to redo this year’s education department budget. For now, school budgets revert to last year’s levels.
Parents are rallying to save five school-based health clinics operated by SUNY Downstate, which serve 10 schools.
To help address the exodus of women from the workforce, New York state is using federal money for a grant program to start new child care programs in areas lacking enough options.
Anyone 18 years old or younger is eligible for free lunch and breakfast this summer at more than 300 schools, pools and parks across the city.
But like most things within the nation’s largest school district, what happens across New York City’s 1,600 schools often varies school to school and even classroom to classroom.
A growing number of educators are embracing the practice, popularized by Christopher Emdin, giving students a bigger say in shaping their learning.