running in place

New York City expanded its efforts to boost diversity at elite specialized high schools. So why hasn’t the needle budged?

Students take an AP exam at Bronx Science, one of the city's specialized high schools.

Last June, city officials rolled out a series of initiatives that were supposed to address an alarming lack of diversity at the city’s elite specialized high schools, where admission is determined by a single test.

To improve access to those eight schools, education officials expanded a program that gives students just below the cutoff a chance to be admitted. They offered the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT) on a school day at a handful of middle schools in underrepresented communities. They boosted public test prep programs and outreach to increase the number of students who take the exam.

But this week, the city announced that there was virtually no change in the number of black or Hispanic students offered admission to schools like Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Tech — and advocates weren’t surprised. They have repeatedly asked Mayor Bill de Blasio to push for an overhaul of the admissions system.

“It’s a paradox to think that some people aren’t doing well because some families aren’t getting into test prep, so we need more test prep,” said Lazar Treschan, youth policy director at the Community Service Society. “Test prep is the problem.”

Despite the city’s efforts to encourage more students of color to take the SHSAT, fewer black students took the exam this year, and represented a slightly smaller share of test takers. And even though the city boosted Hispanic student participation in the test by 544 students — a 9 percent increase — just 10 additional Hispanic students passed.

Overall, the proportion of admissions offers that went to black and Hispanic students this year went almost unchanged at 10.3 percent, a population that represents roughly 70 percent of the city’s students. Meanwhile, just over 80 percent of offers went to white and Asian students, who comprise roughly 30 percent of the student body.

Education department spokeswoman Toya Holness acknowledged “we have a lot more work to do,” but officials said the numbers also reveal “encouraging” trends.

They point to data that show outreach has prompted more students to take the test in districts across the city, and of the 28,000 students who took the test, over a thousand of them took it through a pilot program that offered it on a school day.

Still, some of the city’s reforms have not tended to benefit underrepresented populations. The Discovery Program, which offers admission to some students just below the cutoff, has in the past helped more white and Asian students than black and Hispanic ones.

A number of elected officials and advocates have pushed for a more systematic plan to integrate specialized high schools by guaranteeing a spot for the city’s highest-performing students without regard to the SHSAT, which experts say could double the share of black and Hispanic students at specialized high schools.

“The ticket is going to have to be to look at alternative measures of academic performance” such as state tests and grades, said Sean Corcoran, an NYU professor who wrote a report on the lack of diversity at specialized high schools.

That path is not without roadblocks. There is some debate about whether the city could make changes at five of the eight specialized schools unilaterally, but changing the admissions policy at all eight schools would require a change in state law. So far, de Blasio — who promised to address the issue in his bid for mayor — has been reluctant to push for it.

“The leadership in integration citywide has not come from the [education department], it has come from districts and school leaders,” Treschan said. “We need the DOE to lead the charge on this one.”

Detroit

Week in review: A raise for some Detroit teachers — no pay for others

PHOTO: John/Creative Commons

The situation at the Detroit charter school where teachers won’t get their summer paychecks is a reminder about the precarious finances that can affect both district and charter schools.

Charters don’t typically have historic debts like those that nearly drove the Detroit Public Schools into bankruptcy last year, but Michigan does not provide charter schools with money to buy or renovate their buildings. Unlike districts, charter schools can’t ask voters to approve tax hikes to pay for improvements. And when charter schools borrow money, that debt isn’t supported by the state or backed up by district taxpayers the way some school district debt is. So when a charter school shuts down and money stops coming from the state, there could be many people — that includes teachers — who simply won’t get paid.

Scroll down for more on that story as well as updates on the just-ratified teachers contract and the rest of the week’s Detroit schools news.

— Erin Einhorn, Chalkbeat Senior Detroit Correspondent

 

Paying teachers — or not

  • Detroit teachers who mailed in ballots this month have narrowly approved a new three-year contract in a vote of 515 to 474. “We certainly deserve more,” the union’s president said in a statement “but the package offers us the opportunity to build our local, move our school district forward and place students first.”
  • The new contract, which will now go to a state financial oversight board for approval, would raise teacher salaries by more than 7 percent over the next two years but would not increase wages enough to bring them back to where they were before pay cuts a few years ago.
  • Meanwhile, teachers at the shuttered Michigan Technical Academy charter school — which had a lower school in northwest Detroit and a middle school in Redford — were furious to learn that they won’t get money they’re owed for work they did during the school year. The money will instead go to pay off debts. More than 30 teachers are collectively owed more than $150,000.
  • The school is the second Detroit-area charter school to run into financial problems affecting teacher pay. Educators at the Taylor International Academy in Southfield say they haven’t been paid since their school shut down abruptly in early June. Taylor and MTA also have this in common: Both schools had their charter authorized by Central Michigan University.
  • Meanwhile, across the state, Michigan’s average teacher salary has dropped for the fifth year in a row, and many districts say they have trouble retaining high quality teachers because of low pay. The finding is included in a six-story series on state teacher pay from Michigan Radio that already has detractors.
  • An investor service says the controversial changes Michigan made to its pension system are a “positive” for the state.
  • A University of Michigan economist says substitute teachers are paid less in Michigan than other states — part of why the state has a sub shortage.
  • A suburban district got 952 applicants for a single teaching job but the district’s superintendent says that doesn’t mean there’s not a teacher shortage.

On the home front

In Detroit

Across the state

  • A judge has blocked the state from spending public money on private schools. A Catholic leader explains why he thinks private schools should be entitled to the money.
  • MIchigan has dumped its school ranking system in favor of a dashboard.
  • An advocate who wants schools to face tougher consequences for poor performance slammed Gov. Rick Snyder’s recent school reform efforts. “Parents are tougher on their kids when they don’t eat their vegetables than Detroit’s turnaround plan is with its hometown failure factories,” he wrote.
  • Many of the hurdles that make it difficult to provide enough early education in Detroit also exist in rural Michigan communities.
  • A New York writer says Betsy DeVos might be powerful and influential in Michigan but in Washington without her checkbook, she’s “like a mermaid with legs: clumsy, conspicuous, and unable to move forward.”

In other news

money money money

New York City teachers get news they’ve been waiting for: how much money they’ll receive for classroom supplies

New York City teachers will each get $250 this year to spend on classroom supplies — more than they’ve ever gotten through the city’s reimbursement program before.

The city’s 2017-18 budget dramatically ramped up spending for the Teacher’s Choice program, a 30-year-old collaboration between the City Council and the United Federation of Teachers. More than $20 million will go the program this year.

On Thursday, the union texted its members with details about how the city’s budget will translate to their wallets. General education teachers will each get $250, reimbursable against expenses. (Educators who work in other areas get slightly less; teachers tell the union they spend far more.)

Money given to New York City teachers for classroom supplies, measured in dozens of tissue boxes.

The increase means that Teacher’s Choice has more than recovered from the recent recession. In 2007, teachers were getting $220 a year, but that number fell until the union and Council zeroed out the program in 2011 as part of a budget deal aimed at avoiding teacher layoffs. (Some teachers turned to crowdsourcing to buy classroom supplies.) As the city’s financial picture has improved, and as the union lobbied heavily for the program, the amount inched upwards annually.

“With this increase in funding for Teacher’s Choice, the City Council has sent us a clear message that they believe in our educators and support the work they are doing,” UFT President Michael Mulgrew said in a statement. “At a time where we see public education under attack on a national level, Council members came through for our teachers and our students.”