running in place

New York City expanded its efforts to boost diversity at elite specialized high schools. So why hasn’t the needle budged?

Students take an AP exam at Bronx Science, one of the city's specialized high schools.

Last June, city officials rolled out a series of initiatives that were supposed to address an alarming lack of diversity at the city’s elite specialized high schools, where admission is determined by a single test.

To improve access to those eight schools, education officials expanded a program that gives students just below the cutoff a chance to be admitted. They offered the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT) on a school day at a handful of middle schools in underrepresented communities. They boosted public test prep programs and outreach to increase the number of students who take the exam.

But this week, the city announced that there was virtually no change in the number of black or Hispanic students offered admission to schools like Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Tech — and advocates weren’t surprised. They have repeatedly asked Mayor Bill de Blasio to push for an overhaul of the admissions system.

“It’s a paradox to think that some people aren’t doing well because some families aren’t getting into test prep, so we need more test prep,” said Lazar Treschan, youth policy director at the Community Service Society. “Test prep is the problem.”

Despite the city’s efforts to encourage more students of color to take the SHSAT, fewer black students took the exam this year, and represented a slightly smaller share of test takers. And even though the city boosted Hispanic student participation in the test by 544 students — a 9 percent increase — just 10 additional Hispanic students passed.

Overall, the proportion of admissions offers that went to black and Hispanic students this year went almost unchanged at 10.3 percent, a population that represents roughly 70 percent of the city’s students. Meanwhile, just over 80 percent of offers went to white and Asian students, who comprise roughly 30 percent of the student body.

Education department spokeswoman Toya Holness acknowledged “we have a lot more work to do,” but officials said the numbers also reveal “encouraging” trends.

They point to data that show outreach has prompted more students to take the test in districts across the city, and of the 28,000 students who took the test, over a thousand of them took it through a pilot program that offered it on a school day.

Still, some of the city’s reforms have not tended to benefit underrepresented populations. The Discovery Program, which offers admission to some students just below the cutoff, has in the past helped more white and Asian students than black and Hispanic ones.

A number of elected officials and advocates have pushed for a more systematic plan to integrate specialized high schools by guaranteeing a spot for the city’s highest-performing students without regard to the SHSAT, which experts say could double the share of black and Hispanic students at specialized high schools.

“The ticket is going to have to be to look at alternative measures of academic performance” such as state tests and grades, said Sean Corcoran, an NYU professor who wrote a report on the lack of diversity at specialized high schools.

That path is not without roadblocks. There is some debate about whether the city could make changes at five of the eight specialized schools unilaterally, but changing the admissions policy at all eight schools would require a change in state law. So far, de Blasio — who promised to address the issue in his bid for mayor — has been reluctant to push for it.

“The leadership in integration citywide has not come from the [education department], it has come from districts and school leaders,” Treschan said. “We need the DOE to lead the charge on this one.”

audit findings

Audit finds educational services lacking at Rikers Island, but corrections officials dispute report

PHOTO: Matt Green/Flickr

Corrections officials “systemically neglected” to ensure that young adult inmates knew they could enroll in school courses, according to an audit released Tuesday by Comptroller Scott Stringer. The audit also found that the city Department of Education failed to put mandated educational plans in place for incarcerated students with disabilities.

“That’s wrong, because if we’re going to reverse decades of backwards criminal justice policies, it’s going to be with bigger and better schools — not bigger and tougher prisons,” Stringer said in an emailed statement. “We have to do better.”

But officials from the city Department of Correction disputed the findings, and a response from the education department suggests the audit takes a narrow approach that misses “critical context.”

In 74 percent of sampled cases, the comptroller’s office couldn’t find evidence that inmates between the ages of 18 and 21 attended an orientation and were informed of their right to attend classes. In 68 percent of the sampled cases, auditors could not find required forms from inmates either accepting or rejecting educational services. In its response to the findings, a representative for the corrections department noted that some inmates may simply “refuse to sign the form.”

The corrections department wrote that it “disputes the overall finding” that inmates are not informed of their right to educational services. Furthermore, the audit “failed to capture” additional steps the department takes to do so.

In responses to the findings, included in the audit, corrections and education officials said all eligible students are offered the opportunity to attend classes. Every school day, the education department prints a list of eligible students who are in facilities with school programs, and the list is shared with corrections staff in the housing areas. Inmates who are interested can attend an information session and enroll immediately.

The corrections department’s response also states that inmates receive a handbook that includes information about enrolling in classes, and that signs are posted in common areas to inform inmates of their right to request educational services. Furthermore, the department conducts regular focus groups to create alternative programs of interest to young offenders who choose not to go to school, according to the response.

The audit also found that 48 percent of eligible students did not have a Special Education Plan, based on their Individualized Education Program, created for them within 30 days of beginning classes, as required. Those plans were never created for 36 percent of sample students, according to the audit.

The Department of Education responded that it is working to implement a new electronic system to track progress on education plans for students with disabilities, and that students who had such plans before being incarcerated continue to get the services they need.

The audit does note that all 16- and 17-year olds were receiving the educational services required by law. Those students have to attend school, whether they are incarcerated or not. Older students are eligible to receive educational services if they are under 21 years of age, have not already earned a high school diploma and will be incarcerated for 10 or more days.

Community voices

Memphians weigh in on Hopson’s investment plan for struggling schools

PHOTO: Marta W. Aldrich
Superintendent Dorsey Hopson speaks Monday night to about 175 educators, parents and students gathered to learn about Shelby County Schools' plan to make new investments in struggling schools

After years of closing struggling schools, Shelby County Schools is changing course and preparing to make investments in them, beginning with 19 schools that are challenged by academics, enrollment, aging buildings and intergenerational poverty.

This May, 11 of those schools will receive “treatment plans” tailored to their needs and based on learnings from the Innovation Zone, the district’s 5-year-old school turnaround initiative. The other eight schools already are part of a plan announced last fall to consolidate them into three new buildings.

Superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Chief of Schools Sharon Griffin talked up the new dynamic Monday night during a community meeting attended by about 175 educators, parents and students. In his proposed budget for next school year, Hopson has set aside $5.9 million to pay for supports for the 11 schools dubbed “critical focus” schools. 


Here’s the framework for the changes and which schools will be impacted.


Monday’s gathering was first in which Memphians got to publicly weigh in on the district’s new game plan. Here’s what several stakeholders had to say:

Quinterious Martin

Quinterious Martin, 10th-grader at Westwood High School:

“It really helped me to hear that the label of ‘critical’ is going to help us out, not pull us down. I was worried when I first heard our school would be on the list of critical schools, but I get it now. The point is to help the schools out, not make them feel worse. To me, one thing Westwood really needs is more classes to get us ready for our future careers, like welding or mechanics. My commitment tonight was to always improve in what I do.”

Deborah Calvin, a teacher at Springdale Elementary School:

“I enjoyed the presentation tonight. I think it’s so important to know everyone is on the same page. The plan will only be successful if everyone in the community is aware of what the goals are. I think they made it really clear tonight that just more money doesn’t help turn a school. It takes a lot of community support. We really need more parent involvement at Springdale. Children need support when they go home. They need someone to sit down with them and work through homework or read.”

Catherine Starks, parent at Trezevant High School:

“Honestly, I think this is just going through the motions and something to keep parents quiet. Some schools may be getting the supports they need, but not all of them are. Trezevant is one that is not. … We need good leadership and we need someone to be advocates for our kids. I want to see the kids at our school get the support they need from the principal, the guidance counselor, the superintendent. Trezevant has had negative everything, but now we need some positive attention. And we really need the community to step up.”

Neshellda Johnson and daughter Rhyan

Neshellda Johnson, fourth-grade teacher at Hawkins Mill Elementary School:

“Hawkins Mill has been in the bottom 5 percent for awhile and has been targeted (for takeover) by the state for about four consecutive years. …  It’s refreshing to see that, instead of putting us on the chopping block, the district is looking to actually invest in us and give us the tools we need so we can continue to have growth. … I’m looking to the district for academic supports with regards to reading, more teachers assistants, more time for teaching and less time for testing, and more after-school and summer enrichment programs. And in addition to supports for our students, I’m hopeful there will be supports offered for our parents. We have a need for mental health and counseling services in our area.”

You can view the district’s full presentation from Monday night below: