Slowing down

Amid backlash, Tennessee extends time for public to weigh in on proposed social studies standards

A growing chorus of complaints about Tennessee’s proposed new social studies standards has led a state panel to extend the period for receiving public input on the draft.

The state’s Standards Recommendation Committee voted Wednesday to lengthen the timeline for public comment from Oct. 28 to Dec. 15.

“… We want to be absolutely sure that all Tennesseans have had a chance to be heard,” said Jason Roach, chairman of the appointed 10-member panel, inviting the public to give feedback at the state’s online review site.

The new timeline comes after state leaders began receiving pushback about proposed changes designed to streamline the standards at the expense of numerous historical events and people. Gov. Bill Haslam expressed concern about taking too much history out of the K-12 teaching requirements, as have the legislature’s black caucus and state historian Carroll Van West.

Items moved to other grade levels or left out include major milestones in civil rights movements for minorities and women, the Cherokee origins of the state’s name, why Tennessee is known as the Volunteer State, and several Civil War battles fought in Tennessee. Several of those standards were moved to a new high school elective course in Tennessee history.

The winnowing of the standards was by and large a response to teachers’ concerns that the current set is cumbersome and overly prescriptive. Those standards are only two years old. But the State Board of Education hastened another revamp this year in the wake of concerns from parents and activists about how Islam is being taught to middle schoolers in world history.

An initial online public review was held last winter, generating comments from more than 1,400 reviewers, mainly teachers. This summer, a panel of teachers from across the state used the feedback to make revisions.

The Standards Recommendation Committee is appointed by the governor, lieutenant governor and speaker of the House and confirmed by the legislature as part of Tennessee’s process for reviewing academic standards. The panel will send its final draft to the State Board to vote on next April.

“The State Board of Education wants to make sure this is a very thoughtful and inclusive review process,” said Executive Director Sara Heyburn in a statement. “We have heard from many Tennesseans that there is real interest and commitment to ensuring the best possible standards for the students and teachers of our state. Therefore, it makes sense to slow down and extend the review period to ensure all voices are able to be heard and considered before anything goes to the State Board for their consideration.”

The new standards are to reach Tennessee classrooms in the 2019-20 school year.

Here We Go

House education committee greenlights increasing funding for kindergarten, banning corporal punishment

PHOTO: Ann Schimke
Kim Ursetta works with a student in her classroom at Denver's Mathematics and Science Leadership Academy.

The Colorado House Education Committee on Monday gave bipartisan blessing to two bills that would increase funding for kindergarten in the state’s public schools and ban corporal punishment in schools and child care centers.

The bill to fund the state’s kindergarten programs in public schools, sponsored by state Rep. Jim Wilson, a Salida Republican, is expected to be short-lived given the state’s fiscal constraints. If Wilson’s bill were to become law, it would cost the state more than $42 million. The state currently is funding schools at a $830 million deficit.

The state currently gives schools about $5,000 for every kindergarten student. However, schools receive more than $8,000 for every student in grades one through 12. Wilson’s bill would work toward closing that gap.

“We say we can’t afford it. Well, guess what? Our districts can’t afford it either,” Wilson said.

Most of the state’s school districts offer full-day kindergarten. However, some rely on charging tuition while others divert federal funds to make up the difference.

The bill passed 12-4 with Rep. Lang Sias, an Arvada Republican, joining all the Democrats on the Democratic-controlled committee. But committee members were well aware of the bill’s likely fate.

A similar bill sponsored by Lakewood Democrats Sen. Andy Kerr and Rep. Brittany Pettersen  has already been sent to the Senate’s state affairs committee, where it’s expected to die. The difference between the two bills: Kerr’s and Pettersen’s bill would ask voters to approve a tax increase to pay for kindergarten.

The bill to prohibit corporal punishment, sponsored by Denver Democrat Rep. Susan Lontine, would outlaw using physical punishment for children in public schools and private child care centers. That would extend to small licensed day cares run out of private homes.    

Colorado is one of 19 states that does not currently ban physical violence used as punishment in schools or day cares. Lontine’s bill, which passed on an 11-2 vote, would end such practices, which are rare.

“If you did this at home, it’d be child abuse,” Lontine said. “But if you did it in school, it’d be corporal punishment and it’d be allowed.”

According to a 2011 report by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, nearly 500 incidents of corporal punishment were reported in Colorado. However, that data was called into question when Michael Clough, superintendent of the Sheridan School District, said the 400 cases his district mistakenly reported the data.

“We have not and we do not have corporal punishment,” he said. “It does seem like we need work with data collection.”

Rep. Paul Lundeen, a Monument Republican, attempted to amend the bill that would recognize local school district policies. However, that amendment was defeated on a party-line vote.

Pettersen, the committee’s chairwoman, and other Democrats expressed interest in taking a second look at the amendment when the bill is debated by the entire House of Representatives. They want to ensure that every school district was meeting a state standard.

Monday’s meeting of the House Education Committee marked the first time this session education related bills were discussed. The session is expected to be largely defined by the budget debate and how educators respond to the nation’s new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act.  

Voucher roundup

Gearing up for Tennessee’s voucher fight? Here are eight stories to read.

PHOTO: Grace Tatter
A group of Jubilee School students work on a craft during a summer reading program at La Salle School, one of the Memphis schools expected to accept tuition vouchers if the state legislature approves a program.

When the General Assembly kicks off in earnest next week, one education issue is sure to come up: vouchers.

This will mark Tennessee’s seventh year of legislative debate over vouchers, which are taxpayer-backed scholarships that parents could use to send their kids to private school. In Tennessee, recent legislative proposals would have applied only to students attending the state’s lowest-performing schools.

Whether you’ve followed the debate in years past, or are just tuning in, here’s our list of stories to get informed for this year’s showdown:

Once considered a sure thing, vouchers fizzle in Tennessee legislature.

Let’s pick up where the legislature left off last year — with Rep. Bill Dunn pulling the bill right before it reached the House floor for the first time. The Knoxville Republican, who has championed voucher legislation for years, said he was two votes short.

Chalkbeat explains what vouchers might mean for Tennessee.

Here’s what voucher legislation has looked like in the past — and its potential to shake up public education.

PHOTO: Marta W. Aldrich
State Rep. Bill Dunn looks straight ahead Thursday after tabling his voucher bill, likely for the year, in the Tennessee House of Representatives.

Tennessee shows why vouchers can be a hard sell, even in red states.

Vouchers are in the national spotlight thanks to President Trump’s pick for U.S. education secretary, school-choice advocate Betsy DeVos. Vouchers are typically considered a cause of the Republican Party, which holds a supermajority in Tennessee. The fact that vouchers have been kept at bay in the state shows how the debate goes beyond partisan politics.

Trump’s nominee for education chief already has influenced Tennessee’s voucher debate.

From the helm of education advocacy groups including the American Federation for Children and the Alliance for School Choice, DeVos, a staunch Republican, has contributed millions of dollars to state legislative candidates in favor of vouchers, including several in Tennessee.

Want to keep school vouchers out of Tennessee? You’re too late.

The state actually already has one voucher law in place. This month, eight private schools began accepting public money to educate special education students, giving the State Department of Education its first taste of overseeing a voucher program.

Vouchers could transform Memphis and one network of schools.

Leaders of Jubilee Catholic Schools are lobbying for vouchers. They say the program would boost enrollment in their network of elementary and middle schools established in 1999 by the Dioceses of Memphis to serve low-income students.

But most Memphis private schools are on the fence about accepting vouchers.

While Memphis would be most impacted by a voucher law, leaders of many of the city’s private schools aren’t necessarily interested in participating in the program.

Here’s the lowdown on how vouchers have played out in other states.

Indiana has the nation’s largest voucher program, although the original proposal, like Dunn’s bill in Tennessee, focused primarily on low-income students. Now, Indiana’s program serves middle-class students as well, from families that likely would have opted for private school with or without public money. Student achievement in Indiana has largely been unaffected by vouchers. One study found that students who switched to private schools through the program might actually be doing worse in math.