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Marta W. Aldrich

Senior Statehouse Correspondent, Tennessee

Marta W. Aldrich is Chalkbeat Tennessee’s senior statehouse correspondent. A newswoman for The Associated Press for most of her career, Marta has covered state government, politics, business, education and other Tennessee news. She has served as news editor of United Methodist News Service and features editor of American Profile magazine. Her freelance work has been published by The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Christian Science Monitor and Dow Jones News Service, among others. Marta is a graduate of Memphis City Schools and the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

College president’s mockery of teacher training won’t necessarily dash hopes to bring charters to the state
Local governments in Nashville and Memphis failed to show that an injunction was warranted, the judges ruled
Speedy voucher rollout draws hopeful families, more legal challenges
Lee meets with private school leaders, while his education chief acknowledges the timeline is ‘challenging’
Some candidates worry that national culture wars will overshadow local education issues
Lee says comments were taken out of context, but teacher groups say governor should have repudiated insults
The court order marks another win for Gov. Bill Lee, but more legal challenges loom
With more legal challenges pending, ‘there can’t be any steps going forward,’ Gov. Lee concedes
Cheers, frustrations, and promises to fight follow after Tennessee’s highest court overrules lower courts, clearing an obstacle to the state’s private school voucher law.
The ruling effectively endorses Gov. Bill Lee’s education savings account program, the signature legislation of his first year in office.
Gov. Lee will also sign bill to let a state commission veto school library materials
The goal is more funding for students with costlier needs, but will it be enough?
Instead of addressing flood-prone schools, the money appears to go into Tennessee’s rainy day fund
The state’s voucher program for students with disabilities could double in size.