it's official

State-run Memphis school definitely will close, says Achievement School District

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
ASD Superintendent Malika Anderson listens to parents' concerns during a January meeting at Klondike Elementary, which will close this year due to low enrollment.

After coming up empty-handed in the search for a new operator, Tennessee’s turnaround district will close its first school at the end of this school year, leaders announced Monday night.

Officials with the Achievement School District previously had said that Klondike Preparatory Academy Elementary might close this year, but made it official during a meeting with about 60 Klondike parents, teachers and stakeholders.

The students will be reassigned to Vollentine Elementary, which is less than a mile away and operated by Shelby County Schools. The state took over Klondike from the local district in 2012 due to low performance.

“The reality is this: Our babies deserve to go to a close-by school and stay in the neighborhood,” ASD Superintendent Malika Anderson told the crowd. “They deserve to go to higher-performing school,” she added, noting that she worked with SCS Superintendent Dorsey Hopson to find a higher-performing school for Klondike’s students.

The impending closure is a blow to the state-run district, which has taken over 24 low-performing schools in Memphis since the state legislature created the ASD in 2010 as a mechanism to turn those schools around. The ASD now faces the closure this spring of up to three schools after two of its charter networks announced plans last fall to pull out or scale back their work with the state district.

KIPP Memphis, which is part of a national network, announced in December that it also will pull out of one of its four ASD schools, while Memphis-based Gestalt Community Schools plans to exit both of its ASD schools. Both operators cited under-enrollment. ASD leaders have not announced a final decision about the future of KIPP’s Memphis University Middle School, while Memphis-based Frayser Community Schools has applied to operate Gestalt’s Humes Preparatory Academy Middle.

The state-run district’s relationship with Shelby County Schools has been mostly combative in recent years as the ASD has steadily expanded and siphoned off both students and funding from the local district. But Anderson told parents Monday that the ASD is collaborating with SCS leaders to support Klondike students in the transition ahead, and that the local district will provide bus transportation to Vollentine.

Shelby County Schools, which also has struggled with under-enrollment, now stands to gain students in the transition. Vollentine currently has 258 students and Klondike has 194. Both buildings are designed for more than 500 students.

“There are too many schools for the number of students we have in this county,” Anderson said in response to questions about recent school closures in North Memphis. “What we can do is not be surprised about it. What we can do is make sure we plan for the future. … That’s exactly what the ASD and SCS are engaged in.”

To give parents a choice, the ASD worked with the Memphis School Guide to provide families with a list of up to 13 SCS and ASD schools available to attend. Anderson said Memphis Lift, a parent advocacy group that promotes school choice, is available to provide one-on-one counseling for families needing help.

ASD leaders fielded questions from the crowd about the process for deciding to close the school.

“Why weren’t families engaged more?” asked Klondike Principal Jennifer Islom. “We had an initial meeting, and parents got emails sent to them, but no other committee was created.”

Anderson said seven current ASD operators, including the ASD’s own network, were eligible to apply, but none did.

“We did our due diligence in looking at the finances and honestly we could not make it work,” she said of the decision by the ASD’s Achievement Schools not to apply. “We couldn’t provide a breadth of services here with the number of students available. Instead of providing a subpar experience, we will work with SCS, and find out how we combine these communities.”

packing up

Charter school in Tennessee’s turnaround district relocating out of neighborhood it signed up to serve

PHOTO: Laura Faith Kebede
The new Memphis Scholars Raleigh-Egypt sign next to faded letters of Shelby County Schools name for the middle school.

When officials at Memphis Scholars Raleigh-Egypt Middle School learned that another school on the same campus could get extra help for its students, they made a big decision: to pick up and move.

Memphis Scholars announced Monday that the school will reopen next year in a building 16 miles away, where the charter operator already runs another school under Tennessee’s turnaround district. The network will pay to bus students from the Raleigh neighborhood across Memphis daily.

The move is the latest and most dramatic episode in an ongoing enrollment war between the state-run Achievement School District and Shelby County Schools in the Raleigh neighborhood.

Most recently, Shelby County Schools proposed adding Raleigh-Egypt Middle/High, which shares a campus with Memphis Scholars now, into the district’s Innovation Zone — a change that would bring new resources and, the district hopes, more students.

The Innovation Zone represents a “high-quality intervention” for students in the neighborhood, according to Memphis Scholars Executive Director Nick Patterson. But he said it makes the presence of his school less essential.

Shelby County Schools’ proposal “creates two schools, on the same campus, serving the same grades, both implementing expensive school-turnaround initiatives,” Patterson said in a statement. “Memphis Scholars strongly believes that this duplication of interventions is not in the best interest of students and families as it divides scarce resources between two schools.”

The move also allows the network to solve two persistent problems. First, enrollment at Raleigh-Egypt Middle is less than half of what it was supposed to be, putting so much pressure on the school’s budget that the network obtained an energy audit to help it cut costs. That’s because Shelby County Schools expanded the adjacent high school to include middle school grades, in an effort to retain students and funding.

Plus, Memphis Scholars ran into legal obstacles to adding middle school grades to its Florida-Kansas school. Moving an existing middle school to the Memphis Scholars Florida-Kansas Elementary campus circumvents those obstacles. Because state law requires that at least 75 percent of students at Achievement School District schools come from the neighborhood zone or other low-performing schools on the state’s “priority list,” the charter school can welcome any middle schooler in its new neighborhood.

But network officials want to keep serving their existing students, and they’re offering transportation to make that possible.

It’s unclear if Raleigh students will follow the charter school across town. Some parents reached by Chalkbeat on Monday said they hadn’t heard about the changes yet, but their students said they found out today.

“I hadn’t heard about the changes, but I don’t like that too much,” said Reco Barnett, who has two daughters who attend the school. “We’re here because it’s right by where we live. It’s right in our area. I don’t know what we’ll do yet, I just now found out when you told me, but I don’t know if we’ll be able to do that. That’s a long ways away from us.”

The move would free up the building for use by Shelby County Schools. District officials did not provide comment Monday.

Chalkbeat reporter Caroline Bauman contributed to this story.

Notable departure

Last original leader resigns from Tennessee’s school turnaround district

The state-run Achievement School District began taking over schools in Memphis in 2012.

Margo Roen, who has been instrumental in recruiting local and national charter operators to Tennessee’s Achievement School District, has resigned as its deputy superintendent.

PHOTO: Achievement School District
Margo Roen

She said her departure, which is effective June 30, is not related to the State Department of Education’s plans to downsize and restructure the turnaround district by July 1.

“This decision (to leave) is an extremely hard one, and does not in any way diminish the immense belief I have in our schools and kids, and my admiration, appreciation, and respect for the ASD team, operators, and partners in this work,” Roen told Chalkbeat this week in an email.

With Roen’s departure, the ASD will lose its last original leader. She joined the state-run district in 2011 after its creation as part of Tennessee’s First to the Top plan. Superintendent Malika Anderson, who was once deputy to founding superintendent Chris Barbic, joined a few months later, along with Troy Williams, the ASD’s chief operating officer.

In addition to overseeing charter recruitment efforts, Roen has co-led the ASD’s Operator Advisory Council to give charter leaders more say in ASD decisions and collaborate across the district’s 33 schools.

Roen said she will remain in Memphis and plans to work on projects with school districts across the nation.