Week In Review

Week in Review: Frank talk on race, history — and what Detroit teachers deserve

School may be out for the summer but Detroit teachers are busy reviewing the tentative contract deal their leaders announced last week. The deal could mean two years of pay bumps but it’s gotten mixed reviews from teachers who were hoping to see salaries return to where they were before a 10 percent pay cut in 2011.

Also busy this summer are the community leaders behind the Coalition 2.0 effort, which aims to address some of the unfinished business of last year’s Detroit education fight. This time, the Coalition for the Future of Detroit Schoolchildren is focused on improvements that can be made locally. They’re hoping to avoid the legislature that last year crushed the hopes of advocates who wanted a powerful Detroit Education Commission to oversee district and charter schools.

“Our intentions and energy will look to Detroit, not Lansing. Detroiters must develop a vision, a plan and execute it with fidelity if we are to improve education practices in our city.”

— Tonya Allen, co-chair, Coalition for the Future of Detroit Schoolchildren

Read on for more on these stories and the rest of the week’s education news. Also, this interview with new Detroit schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti is worth a listen. He talks frankly about race, history and the “two sets of expectations,” that for too long have let people outside Detroit think it’s okay for problems to persist here that would never be allowed somewhere else.

Coalition 2.0

  • A year after the tearful defeat of the Detroit Education Commission, local leaders are looking for other ways to bring order to Detroit schools. District and charter school leaders are meeting in hopes of “designing a process in which many of these DEC-like functions can occur.”
  • One schools advocate called the conversations “a good start,” adding “hopefully these longtime rivals can come together to address issues such as school/community logistics, enrollment and transportation.”

“Never going to get what we deserve.”

  • A tentative deal for a new contract would raise Detroit teacher pay 3 percent next year and 4 percent the following year, though teachers would have to wait longer to reach the top of the pay scale.
  • The deal must be approved by teachers, who have mixed feelings about whether the raises are enough. They’ll be voting by mail-in ballots that must be postmarked by July 19. A city financial oversight board must also sign off on the deal.
  • Some of the teachers who are most disappointed by the offer are those who, until last week, worked for the state-run recovery district. The deal would credit them for just two years of experience regardless of how many years they’ve been in the classroom. Advocates for the former recovery district schools fear this could trigger a teacher exodus, especially as other area districts give teachers more credit for their experience.
  • Vitti called the deal a “first step” toward higher pay raises, while a union leader said negotiators tried for more money but settled for what they could get. “We’re never going to get what we deserve to get,” she said.

All about Vitti

  • In an interview on WDET’s Detroit Today, Vitti talked about why he, as an educator, has a different approach to fixing the schools than the state-appointed emergency managers who preceded him. “The system has been run as if it was a system in bankruptcy where you were just releasing assets without an overall vision for how to build student performance,” he said.
  • He also talked frankly about his role as the first white man to lead the majority-black Detroit schools in a generation. “It brings forth a great deal of responsibility and pressure that I embrace,” he said.
  • One schools advocate encouraged Vitti to consider charter schools as he works to improve the district. “More people must realize that half the children in Detroit attend charter schools,” he wrote. “You can’t ignore them, you can’t cut them off and you can’t act like they live in another city.”
  • Vitti won praise this week from a Florida newspaper that noted that many Jacksonville schools got higher grades from the state this year thanks to Vitti’s leadership. “He replaced a large number of principals, which caused some angst, but it was based on a sense of urgency,” the paper wrote, adding that Vitti “took a school system that was already on the rise and led it to new heights.”
  • Closer to home, Vitti also won praise from Mayor Duggan for quickly cutting through red tape to help turn 16 Detroit schools into recreation centers this summer — something the mayor said emergency managers wouldn’t do. The “summer fun centers” will have free meals for kids.

Lansing, leaders and lawsuits

  • Gov. Rick Snyder has ended his brief reign over the office charged with holding schools accountable. Two years after he took the state School Reform Office from the state Board of Ed to make it a gubernatorial office, he has given it back. The move comes four months after the reform office aborted a badly executed effort to close 38 low-performing schools.
  • Some school groups applauded the Lansing education shakeup. Others were steamed.
  • Leaders of school districts involved in lawsuits against the state object to a provision in the state budget that would penalize schools that use public dollars to sue the state. The provision, which critics called an “overreach,” came in response to districts suing to stop the closings.
  • State officials have been barred from spending public money to help private schools comply with state mandates — at least for now. A judge plans to revisit the issue next month.
  • The state’s top lawyer says education officials can’t withhold funds from schools that have culturally insensitive mascots.
  • A state business group is researching strategies to improve Michigan schools.
  • Two supporters of the state’s recent teacher pension changes explain why they think pension reform will help Michigan teachers. But aspiring teachers and the heads of several colleges of education say that the changes feed the narrative that teachers aren’t valued.
  • Michigan virtual charter schools are growing in numbers, but lagging in achievement.

In other news

  • One of the Detroit’s most struggling high schools is getting an overhaul — and a new name. The school will become the fourth Detroit high school to admit only students who score well on an admissions exam.
  • Leaders of a program that puts tutors into Detroit classrooms say schools that participate in their program are more likely to see their test scores climb.  The program also encourages young people to become teachers.
  • As a seven-year-old school advocacy organization closes its doors, one former staffer reflects on the group’s accomplishments including its role in launching a long list of organizations that push for better schools. One organization she didn’t mention but could have: Chalkbeat. We launched this year in part thanks to support from Excellent Schools Detroit.
  • A northwest Detroit charter school that Chalkbeat wrote about last fall has now officially joined the list of Detroit charters closing their doors forever.
  • An organization that trains district, charter, and nonprofit staff is recruiting Detroit education leaders to join Peer Learning Communities starting this fall.
  • A boxing gym that tutors Detroit students has gotten a $100,000 grant from 100 women.

 

Detroit week in review

Week in review: The state’s year-round scramble to fill teaching jobs

PHOTO: DPSCD
Miss Michigan Heather Heather Kendrick spent the day with students at the Charles H. Wright Academy of Arts and Science in Detroit

While much of the media attention has been focused this year on the severe teacher shortage in the main Detroit district, our story this week looks at how district and charter schools throughout the region are now scrambling year-round to fill vacant teaching jobs — an instability driven by liberal school choice laws, a decentralized school system and a shrinking pool of available teachers.

The teacher shortage has also made it difficult for schools to find substitutes as many are filling in on long-term assignments while schools try to fill vacancies. Two bills proposed in a state senate committee would make it easier for schools to hire retirees and reduce the requirements for certifying subs.  

Also, don’t forget to reserve your seat for Wednesday’s State of the Schools address. The event will be one of the first times in recent years when the leader of the city’s main district — Nikolai Vitti — will appear on the same stage as the leaders of the city’s two largest charter school authorizers. For those who can’t make it, we will carry it live on Chalkbeat Detroit.

Have a good week!

– Julie Topping, Editor, Chalkbeat Detroit

STATE OF THE SCHOOLS: The State of the Schools address will pair Vitti with the leaders of the schools he’s publicly vowed to put out of business, even as schools advocates say city kids could benefit if the leaders of the city’s fractured school system worked together to solve common problems.

LOOKING FOR TEACHERS: The city’s teacher shortage mirrors similar challenges across the country but the problem in Detroit is exacerbated by liberal school choice policies that have forced schools to compete with each other for students and teachers.

Hiring efforts continue at Detroit’s main school district, which is planning another job fair. Head Start centers are also looking for teachers. Three new teachers talk about the challenges, rewards and obstacles of the classroom.

WHOSE MONEY IS IT? The state Senate sent a bill to the House that would allow charters to receive a portion of property tax hikes approved by voters. Those funds have historically gone only to traditional district schools.

UNITED THEY STAND: Teachers in this southwest Detroit charter school voted to join a union, but nationally, union membership for teachers has been falling for two decades.

COLLEGE AND CAREERS: A national foundation based in Michigan granted $450,000 to a major Detroit business coalition to help more students finish college.

High school seniors across the state will be encouraged to apply to at least one college this month. The main Detroit district meanwhile showed off a technical center that prepares youngsters and adults for careers in construction, plumbing and carpentry and other fields.  

STEPS TO IMPROVEMENT: A prominent news publisher explains why he told lawmakers he believes eliminating the state board of education is the right thing to do. An advocate urged Michigan to look to other states for K-12 solutions. And one local newspaper says the governor is on the right track to improving education in Michigan.

This think tank believes businesses should be more engaged in education debates.

LISTEN TO US: The newly elected president of a state teachers union says teachers just want to be heard when policy is being made. She wrote in a Detroit newspaper that it takes passion and determination to succeed in today’s classrooms.

A PIONEER: Funeral services for a trailblazing African American educator have been scheduled for Saturday.

Also, the mother-in-law of U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, died in her west Michigan home.

FARM-TO-SCHOOL:  A state program that provides extra money to school districts for locally grown produce has expanded to include more schools.

BETTER THAN AN APPLE: Nominate your favorite educator for Michigan Teacher of the Year before the 11:59 deadline tonight.

An Ann Arbor schools leader has been named the 2018 Michigan Superintendent of the Year by a state group of school administrators.

MYSTERY SMELL: The odor from a failed light bulb forced a Detroit high school to dismiss students early this week.

EXTRA CREDIT: Miss Michigan encouraged students at one Detroit school to consider the arts as they follow their dreams. The city schools foundation honored two philanthropic leaders as champions for education.

And high school students were inspired by a former college football player. 

Detroit week in review

Week in review: The target on the back of the state board of education

State lawmakers this week began a push to eliminate the state board of education and replace it with an appointed superintendent. But before anyone starts writing the board’s obituary, note that the controversial effort would require approval from two-thirds of the legislature and voters in a statewide voter referendum.

Detroit schools, meanwhile, continue to struggle with hiring enough teachers to fill classrooms. The main district has taken the unusual step of putting some counselors and assistant principals in classrooms. Leaders hope the short-term measure won’t interfere with meeting the district’s  ambitious goals.

Read on for more on these stories and the rest of the week’s school news. Also, mark your calendar for the city’s first State of the Schools address, which will be held on October 25. Seats are available for people who want to attend in person. For those who can’t make it, we will be carrying it live on Chalkbeat Detroit.

— Erin Einhorn, Chalkbeat Senior Detroit Correspondent

In the district

Across the state

  • The proposal to get rid of an elected state school board won praise from one editor but got a mixed response from lawmakers during a hearing this week. Eliminating the board, which one lawmaker called “irrelevant,” would require amending the state Constitution.
  • A senate committee has approved a bill that would allow charter schools to get a cut of tax increases that have traditionally benefitted district schools.
  • Trained college grads who give high school students advice about getting into college are relieving pressure on school counselors.
  • A federal court will now consider the legal case filed by a state teachers union against a right-wing spy. Read the union’s complaint here.
  • One educational leader called on the state to develop a way to recruit and retain 100,000 qualified teachers who could serve low-income children in cities and rural communities.
  • A state commission has ruled that a union cannot force the firing of a public school teacher who resigned from the union and stopped paying dues.
  • Career and technical education is on the rise in Michigan — but many students who enroll in those programs don’t complete them.
  • A new survey shows Michigan voters support their local school districts — but are less sure about the quality of instruction across the state.
  • A suburban mom says her son got 8 years of English as a Second Language instruction even though he’s a native English-speaker.