Who makes what

The six-figure bosses, the schools with the highest (and lowest) pay —  and other facts about who’s making what in Detroit schools

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
Detroit schools superintendent Nikolai Vitti leads a meeting in a conference room adjacent to his office in Detroit's Fisher Building in August, 2017.

Detroit’s main school district has undergone dramatic change in recent months. A new superintendent, Nikolai Vitti, took over in May and has been shaking up the district — sending longtime administrators packing, recruiting high-level advisors he knew from his years running schools in Florida and moving educators out of the central office and into classrooms.

To get a sense of how the district’s staff has shifted since Vitti’s arrival, Chalkbeat requested, under the Freedom of Information Act, the full district payrolls for June 1 and October 1.

The two lists are both based on budgets that predate Vitti but they reflect changes he implemented as well as other factors like the 11 schools that returned to the main district following the dissolution in July of the state-run recovery district.

Here’s some of the things we found when we compared the two salary lists:

 

1. The return of the Education Achievement Authority added hundreds of teachers and administrators to the district payroll.

Number of employees, June: 6,125

Number of employees, October: 6,348

 

2. There were more people making $125,000 or more on October 1 than there were in June.

Number making more than $125,000, June: 29

Number making more than $125,000, October: 36

 

3. These were the five people making the highest salaries in June:

Nikolai Vitti, Superintendent, $295,000

Alycia Meriweather, Deputy Superintendent, $202,500

Marios Demetriou, Deputy Superintendent, Finance, $185,000

James Baker, Deputy Superintendent, Operations, $180,000

Carol Weaver, Executive Director, Office of Community Schools, $160,000

To read the full list of people making $125,000 or more in June and October, click here.

 

4. These five were making the highest salaries in October:

Nikolai Vitti, Superintendent, $295,000

Luis Solano, Chief Operating Officer, $195,000

Iranetta Wright, Deputy Superintendent, $190,000

Jenice Mitchell Ford, Lead General Counsel, $185,000

Alycia Meriweather, Deputy Superintendent, $180,000

To read the full list of people making $125,000 or more in June and October, click here.

 

 

5. There are fewer people in the Central office.

We made a list of all salaried employees on the payroll who were not assigned to a specific school and removed people like social workers and psychologists who work in multiple schools. Here’s how June and October compare:

Number of salaried district employees not assigned to a school, June: 237

Number of salaried district employees not assigned to a school, October: 197

Click HERE for a side-by-side comparison of employees by department in June and October.

 

6. As the number of teachers went up, average teacher salary went down.

A new contract negotiated with the city’s teachers union will give most Detroit teachers a pay raise in January so average teacher salaries could be on the way up soon. Over the summer, however, the influx of teachers from the Education Achievement Authority — and the retirements of highly-paid senior teachers — meant average teacher salaries went down overall between June and October. Former EAA teachers came into the main district with lower salaries because they were given no more than two years of experience credit when their schools returned to the main district. (Some took major pay cuts — others chose to leave).The current contract pays teachers between $35,682 and $66,264 based on experience and credentials. Heres how average teacher salaries changed between June and October: (Note: averages are based on people with the job title “teacher.” Educators or specialists with other titles were not included in the analysis). 

Average teacher salary, June: $58,473 (2,317 teachers)

Average teacher salary, October: $56,885 (2,595 teachers)

 

7. The schools that had the highest and lowest average teacher salaries changed between June and October.

Click here to see average teacher salary in each building in June and October, side by side.

 

8. These schools had the district’s highest average teacher salaries in June and October:

June highest average teacher salaries  Average salary October highest average teacher salaries   Average salary
Nichols Elementary School $63,532 Bennett Elementary School $64,357
Bennett Elementary School $62,980 Davis Aerospace $63,449
Golightly Career/Tech Center $62,920 Nichols Elementary $63,293

 

9. These schools had the district’s lowest average teacher salaries in June and October (Note: the four schools with the lowest salaries in October were all in the EAA):

June lowest average teacher salaries Average salary October lowest average teacher salaries   Average salary
Ben Carson HS of Sci&Med $51,081 Diann Banks Williamson Education Center $45,510
Detroit Lions Academy $50,938 Law Elementary $44,098
Mason Elementary School $48,537 Brenda Scott MS $43,867
Diann Banks Williamson Education Center $46,579 Bethune Academy  $41,480
Ofc College & Careers $46,175 Central High School $40,142

10. There’s a lot to learn by looking at the full (sortable) list of what everyone — from principals to bus drivers to lunch aides  — are making. We left off the names to protect employee privacy.

Read the full DPSCD payroll in June. Sort by salary, job title or job location.

Here’s the full DPSCD payroll in October. Sort by salary, job title or job location.

 

Early investment

Foundations put $50 million behind effort to improve lives of young Detroit children

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
The heads of the Kresge and W.K. Kellogg foundations, Rip Rapson and La June Montgomery announce a $50 million investment to support the new Hope Starts Here framework.

The two major foundations behind the creation of a ten-year plan to improve the lives of Detroit’s youngest children are putting up $50 million to help put the plan into action.

As they unveiled the new Hope Starts Here framework Friday morning, the Kellogg and Kresge foundations announced they would each spend $25 million in the next few years to improve the health and education of children aged birth to 8 in the city.

The money will go toward upgrading early childhood education centers, including a new Kresge-funded comprehensive child care center that the foundation says it hopes to break ground on next year at a location that has not yet been identified.

Other foundation dollars will go toward a just-launched centralized data system that will keep track of a range of statistics on the health and welfare of young children, and more training and support for early childhood educators.

The announcement at Detroit’s Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History drew dozens of parents, educators and community leaders. Among them was Detroit Schools Superintendent Nikolai Vitti who said one of the major impediments to improving conditions for young children has been divisions between the various government and nonprofit entities that run schools, daycares and health facilities for young kids.

Vitti said the district would do its part to “to break down the walls of territorialism that has prevented this work from happening” in the past.

Watch the video of of the announcement here.

Detroit's future

In a city where 60 percent of young children live in poverty, a ten-year plan aims to improve conditions for kids

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn/Chalkbeat

A coalition of community groups led by two major foundations has a plan to change the fortunes of Detroit’s youngest citizens.

The Hope Starts Here early childhood partnership is a ten-year effort to tackle a list of bleak statistics about young children in Detroit:

  • More than 60% of Detroit’s children 0-5 live in poverty — more than in any of the country’s 50 largest cities;
  • 13% of Detroit babies are born too early, compared to nine percent nationally;
  • 13% of Detroit babies are born too small, compared to eight percent nationally;
  • Detroit has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country;
  • Nearly 30,000 of eligible young Detroiters have no access to high-quality early learning or child care options.
  • That translates to learning problems later on, including the 86.5% of Detroit third graders who aren’t reading at grade level.

Hope Starts Here spells out a plan to change that. While it doesn’t identify specific new funding sources or propose a dramatic restructuring of current programs, the effort led by the Kresge Foundation and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, names six “imperatives” to improving children’s lives.

Among them: Promoting the health, development and wellbeing of Detroit children; supporting their parents and caregivers; increasing the overall quality of early childhood programs and improving coordination between organizations that work with young kids. The framework calls for more funding to support these efforts through the combined investments of governments, philanthropic organizations and corporations.

Read the full framework here: