When Governor Andrew Cuomo wrapped up his series of State of the State speeches on Wednesday, he had announced one major higher education proposal — free college tuition — and a smattering of K-12 programs designed to help needy students. (You can read his full State of the State booklet here.)

Some of the proposals, which must be approved by the legislature, were announced over the course of multiple speeches, including a plan to boost after-school offerings in some high-needs cities and expand Excellence in Teaching awards. On Wednesday, the governor also threw his support behind several initiatives that echo ones Mayor Bill de Blasio has launched in New York City, including a plan to help low-income students access Advanced Placement exams and a public-private partnership to train more computer science teachers.

Here is a roundup of some of his K-12 proposals:

After-school programs: The governor proposed $35 million to add 22,000 after-school spots in certain cities, including the Bronx. (Read more here.)

Fund AP exams: Cuomo proposed allocating $2 million to cover the Advanced Placement exam fee for 68,000 low-income students.

More Early College High Schools: The governor’s proposal includes an additional $5.3 million to expand Early College High Schools, which allow students to earn an associate’s degree along with a high school diploma. The funds, if approved, are expected to finance at least 10 new Early College High Schools, and under Cuomo’s plan the state’s “failing” or “persistently failing” schools would receive preference.

Support computer science teachers: Cuomo proposes expanding the state’s Master Teacher Program, which provides teachers a stipend and requires them to mentor peers, to include about 115 computer science teachers. He also wants to create a partnership with the tech sector to “help train educators across the state to teach computer science.”

Expand teaching awards: The governor wants to invest $400,000 to recognize at least 60 additional excellent teachers.