Re(new)al schools

New York City plans to close, shrink, or merge these 19 schools into other schools

PHOTO: Ed Reed for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio
Mayor Bill de Blasio.

The New York City education department plans to close 14 low-performing schools at the end of the academic year, officials announced Monday. You can read much more about those changes — and why they’re significant moves for Mayor Bill de Blasio — here.

Here’s the full list of changes the city is proposing.

The nine Renewal schools the city plans to close:

  • P.S. 50 Vito Marcantonio (Manhattan, District 4)
  • Coalition School for Social Change (Manhattan, District 4)
  • High School for Health Careers and Sciences (Manhattan, District 6)
  • New Explorers High School (Bronx, District 7)
  • Urban Science Academy (Bronx, District 9)
  • P.S. 92 Bronx School (Bronx, District 12)
  • Brooklyn Collegiate: A College Board School (Brooklyn, District 23)
  • P.S./M.S. 42 R. Vernam (Queens, District 27)
  • M.S. 53 Brian Piccolo (Queens, District 27)

The five other schools the city plans to close:

  • KAPPA IV (Manhattan, District 5)
  • Academy for Social Action (Manhattan, District 5)
  • Felisa Rincon de Gautier Institute (Bronx, District 8)
  • Urban Assembly School for Wildlife Conservation (Bronx, District 12)
  • Eubie Blake School (Brooklyn, District 16)

The schools the city plans to merge into others:

  • Holcombe L. Rucker School of Community (Bronx, District 8), becoming part of Longwood Preparatory Academy, another Renewal school
  • Entrada Academy (Bronx, District 12) into Accion Academy
  • Middle School of Marketing and Legal Studies (Brooklyn, District 18) into East Flatbush Community and Research School
  • Middle school grades of Gregory Jocko Jackson School (Brooklyn, District 23) into Brownsville Collaborative Middle School

Other changes:

  • Wadleigh Secondary School for The Performing Visual Arts (Manhattan, District 3) will no longer serve middle school students. It will start a plan “to transform Wadleigh into one of New York City’s top audition arts high schools,” according to the city.

The schools that will “graduate” from the Renewal program for showing improvements, gaining the designation of “Rise” school:

  • P.S. 15 Roberto Clemente (Manhattan, District 1)
  • Orchard Collegiate Academy (Manhattan, District 1)
  • Renaissance School of the Arts (Manhattan, District 4)
  • I.S. 528 Bea Fuller Rodgers School (Manhattan, District 6)
  • P.S. 154 Jonathan D. Hyatt (Bronx, District 7)
  • Bronx Early College Academy for Teacher and Learning (Bronx, District 9)
  • DreamYard Preparatory School (Bronx, District 9)
  • J.H.S. 80 The Mosholu Parkway (Bronx, District 10)
  • The Bronx School of Young Leaders (Bronx, District 10)
  • Urban Scholars Community School (Bronx, District 12)
  • P.S. 67 Charles A. Dorsey (Brooklyn, District 13)
  • J.H.S. 50 John D. Wells (Brooklyn, District 14)
  • Ebbets Field Middle School (Brooklyn, District 17)
  • East Flatbush Community Research School (Brooklyn, District 18)
  • Brooklyn Generation School (Brooklyn, District 18)
  • P.S. 328 Phyllis Wheatley (Brooklyn, District 19)
  • Cypress Hills Collegiate Preparatory (Brooklyn, District 19)
  • Pan American International High School (Queens, District 24)
  • P.S. 197 The Ocean School (Queens, District 27)
  • J.H.S. 8 Richard S. Grossley (Queens, District 28)
  • John Adams High School (Queens, District 27)

enrollment woes

More students applied to Renewal high schools this year, but that won’t necessarily jolt sagging enrollment

PHOTO: Alex Zimmerman
August Martin High School is part of New York City's Renewal turnaround program.

High schools in New York City’s controversial turnaround program saw 1,100 more applications this year, a jump city officials touted as evidence the long-floundering schools are rising in popularity.

But overall, 3,305 students received an offer to attend a Renewal high school this year — up just 26 students from the previous year.

Education department officials said the 9 percent rise in applications over last year shows that the 20 high schools in Mayor Bill de Blasio’s expensive and controversial Renewal program are successfully turning a corner and attracting new students. The stakes are high for Renewal schools: City officials have closed or merged schools that have struggled with low enrollment.

But the rise in applications doesn’t necessarily mean those schools will have a flood of new students next year.

One reason for the gap between applications and actual offers is that more students are applying to a larger number of schools. Students can list up to 12 schools on their high school applications, and this year the city saw a 4 percentage point increase in the proportion of students who listed all 12 options. That means students are applying to more schools generally, not just ones in the Renewal program.

Another reason more applications might not yield big enrollment jumps is that students could be ranking Renewal schools lower on their list of choices, making it less likely they will receive an offer to attend.

“If someone ranks a Renewal school 11th,” said Teachers College professor Aaron Pallas, “is that really a reflection of the change in demand for that school?”

There are different ways students can receive initial offers. They can be matched with a school on their list of 12 choices. Or, if they don’t receive a match, they can be assigned to their default “zoned” neighborhood school.

About 140 more students received offers as a result of ranking them among their 12 preferred choices this year, which a department spokesman said is evidence of increased interest in Renewal high schools. But fewer students were assigned to Renewal schools after failing to receive an offer based on their list of 12 choices, which is why only 26 additional students overall were matched at Renewal high schools this year. (An official also noted that two Renewal high schools are closing, which also caused fewer offers to be issued.)

The spokesman added that the number of offers by itself is not a perfect predictor of next year’s enrollment, since students who were not matched to any schools during the initial round of applications can now apply again. (It’s also possible that some students who arrive to the city after admissions process ends could be sent to a Renewal school.)

Still, at some Renewal schools, the jump in applications has been significant, which Pallas said could suggest some schools are successfully changing their image. At Fordham Leadership Academy for Business and Technology in the Bronx, for instance, the school received 945 applications this year — a 47 percent increase.

And at Longwood Preparatory Academy, which saw a 16 percent bump in applications, Principal Asya Johnson said the school has worked hard to market itself to families. The school changed its name, launched a new career and technical program in digital media, plastered local bodegas with fliers, and beefed up its social media presence. For the first time this year, school officials invited middle school guidance counselors across the Bronx for brunch and a tour.

“We have been doing a lot of recruitment,” she said. “We are constantly advertising ourselves.”

Below, you can find a list of each Renewal high school and a breakdown of how many applications they received this year compared with last year. (The list also includes “Rise” schools, which are being phased out of the turnaround program.)

The New Chancellor

Tell us: What should the new chancellor, Richard Carranza, know about New York City schools?

PHOTO: Christina Veiga
A student at P.S. 69 Journey Prep in the Bronx paints a picture. The school uses a Reggio Emilia approach and is in the city's Showcase Schools program.

In a few short weeks, Richard Carranza will take over the nation’s largest school system as chancellor of New York City’s public schools.

Carranza, who has never before worked east of the Mississippi, will have to get up to speed quickly on a new city with unfamiliar challenges. The best people to guide him in this endeavor: New Yorkers who understand the city in its complexity.

So we want to hear from you: What does Carranza need to know about the city, its schools, and you to help him as he gets started April 2. Please fill out the survey below; we’ll collect your responses and share them with our readers and Carranza himself.

The deadline is March 23.