High achievers

Is your school a ‘Reward’ school? Here’s the list of schools honored for their high scores

PHOTO: Flickr
Brooklyn Technical is one of the city's prestigious specialized high schools.

More than 60 New York City schools have earned “Reward” status from the state education department for their high test scores or for making strides towards their academic goals.

Schools on the list had to land in the top 20 percent of schools statewide based on their math and English state test scores during the 2015-16 and 2016-17 school years, or be among the top 10 percent of schools based on score growth in 2016-17. High schools must have graduation rates above 80 percent to meet the high-achievement mark, or above 60 percent to qualify as “high progress.”

The schools also had to have at least 95 percent of all student groups take the state tests — a challenge for schools where many families boycotted the exams — and could not have unacceptably large gaps” in achievement between students that belong to historically underperforming groups, such as low-income students, and their peers.

In the past, some Reward schools received federal grants, but that has ended under the new federal education law.

“It’s truly impressive that so many of this year’s Reward Schools were able to maintain the designation for three years in a row,” Commissioner Elia said. “All of these schools serve as models to others in the state to inspire them to achieve a high level of accomplishment and improvement.”

Many of the schools are familiar names on top-performer lists.

Several have selective admissions, allowing them to choose students based on their prior grades or test scores. A few — including Stuyvesant High School and Staten Island Technical High School — are “specialized schools” that admit students solely based on their scores on an entrance exam, which critics say has the effect of excluding many students of color.

This is the last year of the Reward designation, which was a feature of the previous federal education law. Under the new law, New York plans to identify “Recognition” schools, based on “high achievement or rapid improvement,” according to state officials. The exact method for identifying those schools is still being worked out.

Here is this year’s Reward schools:

New York City (64 school)

  • Academy of Finance and Enterprise
  • All City Leadership Secondary School
  • Baccalaureate School for Global Education
  • Ballet Tech/NYC PS for Dance
  • Baruch College Campus High School
  • Bronx High School of Science
  • Brooklyn College Academy
  • Brooklyn School of Inquiry
  • Brooklyn Tech High School
  • East Side Elementary – PS 267
  • East Side Middle School
  • Eleanor Roosevelt High School
  • Fiorello H LaGuardia High School
  • High School for Dual Language and Asian Studies
  • High School of American Studies at Lehman College
  • Leon M Goldstein High School for the Sciences
  • Manhattan Center-Science and Math
  • Manhattan Village Academy
  • Millennium Brooklyn High School
  • Millennium High School
  • MS 243 Center School
  • MS 255 Salk School of Science
  • MS 358
  • New Explorations Science, Technology and Math
  • NYC Lab High School for Collaborative Studies
  • NYC Museum School
  • PS 101 – The Verrazano
  • PS 11 Purvis J Behan
  • PS 110 Florence Nightingale
  • PS 130 Hernando De Soto
  • PS 134
  • PS 150
  • PS 163 Alfred E Smith
  • PS 173 Fresh Meadows
  • PS 184 Shuang Wen
  • PS 195 Manhattan Beach
  • PS 198 Isador E Ida Straus
  • PS 199 Jessie Isador Straus
  • PS 2 Alfred Zimberg
  • PS 212 Midtown West
  • PS 213 The Carl Ullman School
  • PS 247
  • PS 249 – The Caton
  • PS 25 Eubie Blake School
  • PS 26 Jesse Owens
  • PS 26 Rufus King
  • PS 28 – The Warren Prep Academy
  • PS 35 The Clove Valley School
  • PS 39 Henry Bristow
  • PS 397 Foster-Laurie
  • PS 41 Greenwich Village
  • PS 42 Benjamin Altman
  • PS 77 Lower Lab School
  • PS 89
  • PS 96
  • Queens College School for Math, Science and Technology
  • Queens Gateway to Health Science Secondary School
  • Queens High School Science at York College
  • Special Music School
  • Staten Island Tech High School
  • Stuyvesant High School
  • Tag Young Scholars
  • The Academy of Talented Scholars
  • Townsend Harris High School

Rest of the state (73 schools)

  • Akron High School
  • Amherst Central High School
  • Ardsley High School
  • Bayport-Blue Point High School
  • Bethpage Senior High School
  • Briarcliff High School
  • Brighton High School
  • Bronxville Elementary School
  • Caledonia-Mumford High School
  • Clarkstown South Senior High School
  • Clinton Senior High School
  • Colonial School
  • Columbia High School
  • Croton-Harmon High School
  • Dobbs Ferry High School
  • Earl L Vandermeulen High School
  • East Aurora High School
  • Eastchester Senior High School
  • Fayetteville-Manlius Senior High School
  • Garden City High School
  • Great Neck South High School
  • Haldane High School
  • Half Hollow Hills High School East
  • Half Hollow Hills High School West
  • Harborfields High School
  • Harrison High School
  • Hastings High School
  • Herricks High School
  • Honeoye Falls-Lima Senior High School
  • Iroquois Senior High School
  • Irvington High School
  • Jamesville-Dewitt High School
  • Jericho Senior High School
  • John F Kennedy High School
  • Keene Central School
  • Lansing High School
  • Locust Valley High School
  • Lynbrook Senior High School
  • Maine-Endwell Senior High School
  • Manhasset Secondary School
  • Maple Hill High School
  • Mt Sinai High School
  • Murray Avenue School
  • Nanuet Senior High School
  • New Hartford Senior High School
  • North Shore Senior High School
  • Owego Free Academy
  • Pelham Memorial High School
  • Penfield Senior High School
  • Pittsford-Mendon High School
  • Plainview-Old Bethpage/JFK High School
  • Pleasantville High School
  • Rebecca Turner Elementary School
  • Rhinebeck Senior High School
  • Ripley Central School
  • Roslyn High School
  • Rush-Henrietta Senior High School
  • Rye Neck Senior High School
  • Sayville High School
  • Shaker High School
  • Skaneateles Senior High School
  • Smithtown High School-West
  • Somers Senior High School
  • South Side High School
  • Spackenkill High School
  • Syosset Senior High School
  • Todd Elementary School
  • Vestal Senior High School
  • W Tresper Clarke High School
  • Walter Panas High School
  • Wantagh Senior High School
  • Williamsville East High School
  • Yorktown High School

Charter schools (18 schools)

  • Academy of The City Charter School
  • Achievement First Apollo Charter
  • Achievement First Bushwick Charter
  • Beginning with Children Charter II
  • Bronx Charter School Better Learning
  • Hellenic Classical Charter School
  • Icahn Charter School 2
  • Icahn Charter School 3
  • Icahn Charter School 5
  • Icahn Charter School 6
  • Imagine Me Leadership Charter School
  • Rochdale Early Advantage Charter School
  • South Bronx Classical Charter School
  • Success Academy Charter School – Bronx 2
  • Success Academy Charter School – Cobble Hill
  • Success Academy Charter School – Harlem 2
  • Success Academy Charter School – Harlem 4
  • Success Academy Charter School – Williamsburg

change of heart

Chicago school board backs down on ID policy but clings to limits on speakers

PHOTO: Elaine Chen
The Chicago Board of Education

Public visitors to the monthly Chicago Board of Education meetings will not be required to show ID to enter the meetings, despite a notice in the September agenda prominently displaying the rule.

“It is crucial for the board’s monthly public meetings to be open to all interested community members, and to ensure no barriers to participation exist, we are rescinding the photo ID requirement for tomorrow’s meeting and all future meetings,” Chicago schools’ spokesman Michael Passman said Tuesday.

The identification rule was not new, and no one had ever been denied entrance for failing to bring ID, according to Passman. But the Chicago Teachers Union and several community members complained when the September agenda was released earlier in the week, prominently displaying the rule front-and-center.

Union Vice President Stacy Davis Gates called the ID requirement a “Jim Crow-era voter suppression” tactic that could “disenfranchise black voters and scare off undocumented residents.”

The board, however, is not planning to back down from another rule it also highlighted in the September agenda, according to Passman: That one prohibits public commenters from addressing the board two consecutive meetings in a row.

Similarly, the limit is not a new policy — in fact, it dates back to 1999. The board opted to spotlight it this month to deter consecutive speakers from signing up for speaking spots and then finding out later they would not be permitted to participate.

Chicago still requires public commenters to register before meetings and limits the number to 60. The two-minute spots usually fill up a day early. Same-day slots for observers who wish to attend but not participate are first-come first-serve.

Among the planned speakers on Wednesday is a group of parents who have written a letter of concern over a district policy requiring Local School Council members to undergo fingerprinting for a background check. They argue it deters participation from undocumented families. Chicago had nearly 200,000 undocumented residents in 2017, according to one demographer’s estimates.

listening tour

Estos padres quieren eliminar los obstáculos para hispanohablantes en las escuelas de Detroit

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
Un aguacero no pudo detener estas madres el martes. Asistieron una discusión sobre las escuelas en Detroit.

To read this story in English, click here.

Si te parece difícil navegar el sistema escolar de Detroit, imagínate como es cuando nadie habla tu idioma.

Una discusión el martes sobre los obstáculos que enfrentan los estudiantes que hablan español en Detroit dejó en claro que sus padres también se encuentran problemas parecidos.

Los padres que se presentaron en el edificio de Brilliant Detroit quieren apoyar a sus hijos mientras aprenden a leer y hablar en inglés, pero afirmaron que es mucho más difícil hacerlo cuando no se pueden comunicar con las escuelas.

“Uno siente que no tiene valor,” dijo Gloria Vera, hablando de sus interacciones con maestros angloparlantes. “Te sientes que tienes menos oportunidades para hacer preguntas. Yo por ejemplo me da miedo.”

Varias madres confesaron inquietudes sobre los efectos de la ley de lectura de Michigan, que podrá retrasar a estudiantes del tercer grado si su nivel de lectura no es suficientemente alto para el año que viene. Según una investigadora, un 70 por ciento de estudiantes que hablan español en Michigan podrán ser retrasados.

Una madre dijo que quiere apoyar a su hija mientras aprende a leer, pero se preocupaba que su propio nivel de inglés estaba demasiado bajo.

Otra, Delia Barba, sospecha que su hija tiene una discapacidad de aprendizaje, pero afirma que su escuela en el suroeste de Detroit, un barrio mayormente hispanohablante, todavía no la ha examinado.

Barba — como casi todos las madres que asistieron el evento — dijo que las escuelas deben contratar más empleados bilingües.

“No sabemos con quién hablar,” Barba dijo. “No hablan español.”

Chalkbeat, un periódico en linea que se enfoca en las escuelas de Detroit, está recorriendo la ciudad, preguntándoles a padres cuáles asuntos debemos investigar. Esta vez, Chalkbeat fue acompañado por organizaciones centradas en el barrio “Southwest.” Juntos, iniciamos una discusión con docenas de padres, mayormente madres hispanohablantes. Vinieron a la sede de Brilliant Detroit por la mañana, a pesar de un aguacero.

Algunas de las presentes ya habían colaborado con organizaciones locales como Congress of Communities y el Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation para insistir que los líderes del distrito de Detroit expanden acceso para familias que hablan español. Apuntaron que sus preguntas fueron ignorados por administraciones pasadas.

“Los residentes de la comunidad se sienten frustrados en 2018, porque han expresado la necesidad de acceso al idioma en repetidas ocasiones a lo largo de los años y una resolución es continuamente ignorada,” dijo Elizabeth Rojas, una organizadora que también es una madre del distrito. “Sabemos que los estudiantes se van de nuestra ciudad para asistir a los distritos escolares en los suburbios. Si fortalecemos nuestros servicios de idiomas, estamos seguros de que muchas más familias regresarán al distrito.”

En una reunión el mes pasado, el superintendente de escuelas Nikolai Vitti señaló que iba a establecer un “hotline” – linea telefónica – en español y que cada escuela con estudiantes que hablan español iba a contratar a un empleado hispanohablante en la oficina central, entre otras promesas.

Al recibir los resultados de una encuesta en el barrio, los padres ahora se están enfocando en la pregunta de seguridad en las escuelas. Esperan que las escuelas contratarán a más policías bilingües, y que padres que no tienen papeles serán permitidos entrar en las escuelas con una tarjeta de identificación alternativa, por ejemplo un pasaporte mexicano o un ID proporcionado por el mismo distrito.

El martes, los padres reportaron que también hay una falta de servicios bilingües en las escuelas “charter” en el suroeste de Detroit. Angelina Romero, quien llegó con su familia de México en los últimos años, se preocupaba que su hijo del primer grado no está aprendiendo inglés en una escuela “charter,” y que tenía dificultades en comunicarse con su maestra.

“Ojalá que las familias que asistieron este evento se dan cuenta que hay padres en otras escuelas y en otras partes de la ciudad que también quieren más servicios bilingües,” dijo Jametta Lilly, directora del Detroit Parent Network, uno de los anfitriones del evento.

Para Gloria Vera, fue aun más difícil navegar el sistema de educación especializada por la presencia de una barrera lingüística. Su hija recibió un diagnosis de autismo, pero cuando se presentó a la escuela le dijeron que no había suficiente espacio.

“Me dijeron, no puedes matricular tu hija aquí,” dijo Vera.

Le dieron un número de teléfono para llamar, pero Vera dudaba que la ayudara.

“No sabía inglés,” explicó. “Me sentía perdida.”

Encima de la discusión se cernía la ley de lectura del tercer grado. Para estos padres, nunca iba a ser fácil ayudar a sus niños a aprender a leer en un segundo idioma — pero la ley aumentó la presión.

Yesenia Hernandez afirmó que lee a su hija de segundo grado en inglés, pero se preocupaba que su pronunciación no es perfecta.

“Ella está aprendiendo, y yo la estoy confundiendo,” dijo.

Trabajando a lado de cinco madres, Hernandez creó una lista de las maneras en que su escuela podría ayudarle a ayudar a sus hijos. Otros grupos trabajaban en sus propias listas, y cuando compararon los resultados, se notaba muchas semejanzas. Por lo general, los padres querían comunicarse con las escuelas en español, y pidieron recursos — como clases de inglés para adultos  — cuyos beneficios se trasladarían a sus hijos. Un grupo apuntó la “sala de padres” de Priest Elementary-Middle School, donde padres que hablan español pueden reunir para compartir información y recursos.

Quieren apoyar a sus hijos mientras aprenden a leer, pero los padres admitieron que sienten inciertos sobre los efectos de la ley del tercer grado, que iniciará el año que viene. ¿Si sus hijos fueron retrasados al tercer grado, cómo serían afectados?

Para Delia Barba, no había problema: “¿Qué pasa si dicen pasa, pasa, pasa, y no sabe cómo leer?” preguntó.

Pero Gloria Vera tenía dudas. En su barrio, aproximadamente 80 por ciento de los estudiantes hablan español en casa. ¿Cuántos iban a ser regresados?

“En esta parte de Detroit, debe haber una solución,” dijo.