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Weekend Reads: Why affluent parents have outsized influence in diverse schools

Children play in the gym of P.S. 133 in Park Slope in 2013. The school's admissions system, which sets aside some seats for low-income students and English learners, has served as a model for other schools hoping to maintain a diverse mix of students.
Children play in the gym of P.S. 133 in Park Slope in 2013. The school's admissions system, which sets aside some seats for low-income students and English learners, has served as a model for other schools hoping to maintain a diverse mix of students.
Anika Anand
  • One takeaway from a recent study of school choice in Washington, D.C.: White parents will go long distances to make sure their kids go to majority-white schools. (Slate)
  • Selective admissions processes fuel segregation in Brooklyn’s middle schools. (Chalkbeat)
  • In rare schools that are racially and economically diverse, white and affluent parents often have outsized influence. (The Atlantic)
  • Read this if you want to get caught up on the last 50 years of policy, debate, and research related to the black-white achievement gap. (Chalkbeat)
  • San Francisco principals are defying their school board and hiring Teach For America teachers. (S.F. Chronicle)
  • A former Obama administration official and lifelong Democrat says the Democratic Party’s new education platform is a betrayal. (The 74 Million)
  • Mike Pence, the Indiana governor who could soon be Donald Trump’s vice president pick, opposed No Child Left Behind. (Chalkbeat)
  • School officials in Camden, N.J., are tackling formidable challenges with a combination of policy changes and hitting the streets. (The 74 Million)
  • Forget letter grades and numerical scores. California wants to grade schools with colors. (L.A. Times)
  • You knew it was coming: What “Pokemon Go” can teach us about education. (EdSurge)

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