How I Lead

Why this Colorado principal hand delivers birthday cards to more than 2,000 students and staff

PHOTO: Hill Street Studios | Getty Images
Happy birthday sign and balloons on school locker

Here, in a series we call “How I Lead,” we feature principals and assistant principals who have been recognized for their work. You can see other pieces in the series here.

Can you imagine marking the birthdays of more than 2,000 people?

Probably not, but Sharee Blunt, the principal of Northglenn High School, can. With the help of a massive spreadsheet and a talented office manager, she hand-delivers a birthday card to every student and staff member in her suburban Denver school.

Blunt talked to Chalkbeat about how recognizing birthdays helps her get to know students, what a mother’s emotional reaction made her realize, and why she gave a teacher a pass during a lesson that went awry.

Blunt was recently named the 2018 High School Principal of the Year for Colorado by the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

This interview has been condensed and lightly edited.

What was your first education job and what sparked your interest in the field?

My first job was at Shaw Heights Middle School in Westminster teaching physical education and health. I have always had a strong desire to work with young adults and inspire them to reach goals through education. My parents always stressed the importance of a good education and how that can positively impact a person’s life, and I wanted to share that same philosophy with others.

Fill in the blank. My day at school isn’t complete unless I __________. Why?

My day at school is not complete unless I get the opportunity to connect with at least one student, one teacher, and one parent. I believe it is our social responsibility to help positively impact at least one person’s life each day.

PHOTO: courtesy of Sharee Blunt
Principal Sharee Blunt, with students at Northglenn High School.

How do you get to know students even though you don’t have your own classroom?

I get to know students by showing them that I genuinely care about them. Every morning I try to start my day by being out in the hallways and telling them good morning and to have a great day. I make every attempt to support our students at extracurricular activities such as concerts, sporting events, and banquets. I look for opportunities to bring the student voice into building decisions through the principal’s advisory committee that I established when I became principal.

I also love celebrating birthdays so I hand-deliver a birthday card to each of our students and staff members on their birthdays. I have a lot of help organizing this with my office manager, of course.

Tell us about a time that a teacher evaluation didn’t go as expected — for better or for worse?

Recently I was in a teacher’s classroom for a formal observation on a Friday afternoon right before spring break. I had thought about postponing the observation because I anticipated the students would be restless, but I also wanted to honor the teacher’s intentional and thoughtful planning for the evaluation. The lesson did not go as the teacher had planned and I felt her stress and frustration quickly. I reassured her that we all have those kind of days where even our best laid plans do not go as expected and it was OK. She is a great educator and I hope that she felt supported – I look forward to being in her classroom again in the next week.

What is an effort you’ve spearheaded at your school that you’re particularly proud of?

A couple of years ago I wanted to start up a system of “giving back” and “paying it forward,” so I created a campaign called Norse Cares, after the school’s nickname. I am proud to say that climate and culture we have inside our building is built on treating others with kindness and we look for a variety of different ways to help our Norse families and community members.

During winter break we provided gifts and food to 120 students. We provided three books to each kindergarten students at North Mor Elementary School. In October we raised money to put together 60 bags for cancer patients enduring chemotherapy at the Rocky Mountain Cancer Center in Thornton.

How do you handle discipline when students get into trouble?

Student discipline is one of the toughest parts of being an administrator. Great people make poor decisions from time to time and I believe it is really important to discipline the behavior and not the person. What I mean by that is that you can have a hard conversation with someone without making it personal. I always try and handle discipline situations with dignity and kindness so that the student knows that I care about them through those tough times.

What is the hardest part of your job?

The hardest part of my job has been handling the death of a student or staff member. We are blessed with the opportunity to work with over 2,000 students every year and you make every effort to get to know them. When something happens to one of them, it is like losing a family member.

Tell us about a memorable time — good or bad — when contact with a student’s family changed your perspective or approach.

Four years ago I was working with the family of an incoming ninth grader who did not live within our school boundaries. Their son Frank had applied to our STEM biomedical and engineering pathway, a four-year program that allows students to earn college credit and work closely with industry partners. The family knew that we had a waiting list to get into the program and waited anxiously to find out if Frank was accepted.

At our spring STEM celebration that year the family learned that Frank had been accepted and Frank’s mom came over to me with tears streaming down her cheeks. I will never forget her words as she told me how we were going to change her son’s life forever. Frank is a senior at our school and will be graduating in May. Not only has Northglenn High School and our STEM education changed Frank’s life and his future, he has changed our lives too – Frank and his family inspire me every day. They are a great reminder of the true value of education and the work we do every day.

What issue in the education policy realm is having a big impact on your school right now? How are you addressing it?

The issue having a big impact on our school and every other school would probably be school funding. Financial resources are low, deferred building maintenance is high, and other financial responsibilities have a negative impact on daily operations. As a school, we are addressing the issue by seeking grants and other resources to provide the best quality education for our students.

What’s the best advice you ever received?

The best advice I have received is to end each day on a positive note and wake up every morning with a grateful heart. “Not every day is a good day but there is good in every day.”

How I Lead

This Memphis principal says supporting teachers and parents helped pull her school out of the bottom 10 percent

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
Principal Yolanda Dandridge has led Georgian Hills Achievement Elementary for the last two years, and was previously the academic dean.

Here, in a series we call “How I Lead,” we feature principals and assistant principals who have been recognized for their work. You can see other pieces in the series here.

Principal Yolanda Dandridge walks almost 14,000 steps a day — double the national average.

It takes a lot of walking to manage two schools. Dandridge has led Georgian Hills Achievement Elementary for the last two years and was previously the academic dean. She temporarily took over Frayser Achievement Elementary when the schools had to share space this year because of maintenance issues at Georgian Hill’s original building.

“I am constantly on the move,” Dandridge said. “How else can you keep up with elementary students?”

Both schools are part of the Achievement School District, which is charged with turning around the state’s lowest-performing schools but has struggled to accomplish the task.

This year, Georgian Hills not only left the bottom 5 percent but moved out of the bottom 10 percent. In 2016, before Dandridge took charge, Georgian Hills was in the worst 2 percent of schools.

Dandridge was honored by the achievement district for her work.

“She is a real standout among our principals of someone who understands what it takes to turn things around,” said interim achievement district leader Kathleen Airhart.

Dandridge talked to Chalkbeat about how she gets to know her students, her efforts to motivate teachers, and why school buildings are important.

This interview has been condensed and lightly edited.

What was your first education job and what sparked your interest in the field?

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
Dandridge walks almost 14,000 steps a day — double the national average.

I tell my teachers to always stay focused on the “why” behind their careers. For me, my “why” was the fact that my little brother got all the way through elementary school without learning to read. He wasn’t able to read until the fifth grade. He came from a family of educators, and he still slipped through the cracks. If that could happen to him, it could happen to so many kids.

I started teaching in Rolling Fork, Mississippi, and I taught in that state for more than a decade. I came to Memphis as a teacher, I was asked later to consider taking on the principal role at Georgian Hills. I said, “You want me to do what?” Now, I’m grateful for all those years in the classroom and as an academic dean to prepare me for this role.

How do you get to know students even though you don’t have your own classroom?

Any chance to get into the classroom, I will. If a substitute teacher doesn’t come, which does happen sometimes, I will teach the students in that classroom for a day. I love getting to know students by helping out in the classroom.

I am also constantly walking the hallways of both schools. That’s how I start the morning — I greet students and their parents by name when they walk into the school. I walk students to their classrooms. I’m constantly monitoring the hallways.

When a new student registers for classes, the first thing the office staff knows to do is call me down so I can meet them.

How do you handle discipline when students get into trouble?

I really prefer to always consider the experiences that a child may have had prior to entering our building.  When you approach discipline with a keen awareness of the types of situations a child might have or experience, it really makes you a better educator.  And you understand that the best thing for us to do is to ensure that students know and understand that we have their best interests in mind. When children connect with you and other teachers in this way, discipline is less challenging.

What is an effort you’ve spearheaded at your school that you’re particularly proud of?

I’m very proud of what we’ve done at Georgian Hills and now at Frayser to really focus on our teachers.

Every Wednesday after school, we’ll have a period of professional development. I try to be attentive to what my teachers tell me they want to learn more about. There is a lot of coordination on lesson plans in particular. Teachers work together on their lesson planning, and I also will personally give feedback on a teahers’ lesson plans. My biggest, driving question is “What do my teachers need most?” They don’t need to be spending hours everyday lesson planning when they can collaborate. We can help there.

Tell us about a time that a teacher evaluation didn’t go as expected — for better or for worse?

Evaluating teachers has always provided me with the opportunity to hear and see the creativity and passion that our teachers bring to the classroom.  My thought on evaluations is to take the anxiety out of it and ensure that teachers are comfortable and understand that the overall process is about improving their skills and enhancing the tools in their toolbox.

Tell us about a memorable time — good or bad — when contact with a student’s family changed your perspective.

PHOTO: Caroline Bauman
This year, Georgian Hills not only left the bottom 5 percent but moved out of the bottom 10 percent of schools in Tennessee.

When I was early in my teaching career in Mississippi, I had a student with a single mom. Her mom was an amazing support system for me and my classroom. She was always wanting to volunteer at the school. But she struggled to provide basic needs for her daughter — she was struggling to get a job. But she was trying so hard. There’s a stigma of parents, especially in low-income communities, not participating or caring about their child’s education. This mom was giving her all, and it changed my view of parental support. The school needed to find ways to also support her.

And so as a principal, I’m always thinking about how I can support my parents and invite them into the school. So that they feel welcome and wanted, and also so they are encouraged in their own role in their child’s education. We hold math and science nights, where parents learn how to do math games or science experiments at home with their kids. We provide them with materials and knowledge so that they can provide enrichment in their own home.

What issue in the education policy realm is having a big impact on your school right now? How are you addressing it?

We, like many schools in Memphis, don’t have the facilities we need for our students. Georgian Hills had to vacate our school building due to an issue with the roof. That created a hard environment for this school year — moving to a new building where we share space, and then me taking on that school as its school leader when the principal left. Honestly, I thought this year could break me as a school leader. But it didn’t, and it didn’t break our school either. We had a culture in place where our teachers felt supported among the chaos of the start of the year. After a year of repairs, we’re planning on moving back to our original building this fall.

But the issue here is that we don’t have the school buildings we need. Schools should be palaces in a community.

What’s the best advice you’ve received?

You have to mobilize people’s efforts to “win.” The first secret to this is to love your people. They are here for a purpose and you have to help them understand the higher purpose that they are here to serve.  You have to have the right people in place, be responsible for developing them, and have the courage to let them go when student’s needs aren’t being met. Finally, transparency rules.

How I Lead

This Colorado principal believes in the power of positive phone calls to parents

PHOTO: Courtesy of Kristin Golden
Kristin Golden, principal of Riverdale Elementary School in Thornton, talks with students.

Here, in a series we call “How I Lead,” we feature principals and assistant principals who have been recognized for their work. You can see other pieces in the series here.

When students visit Principal Kristin Golden’s office at Riverdale Elementary School in Thornton, it doesn’t always mean they’re in trouble. Sometimes, it’s just the opposite — a time to spotlight a child’s accomplishment with a phone call home.

Golden talked to Chalkbeat about what merits those calls to parents, where she starts her day, and how she evaluates teachers.

Golden was recently named Distinguished Principal of the Year award for Colorado by the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

This interview has been condensed and lightly edited.

What was your first education job and what sparked your interest in the field?
I grew up in the suburbs of Louisville, Kentucky. My first few teaching jobs were in a couple of districts in Kentucky, where I taught kindergarten, second, third, and fourth grade.

When I was a little first-grader I loved my teacher so much. I remember knowing at an early age I would grow up to help children by being a teacher.

Fill in the blank. My day at school isn’t complete unless I __________. Why?
My day at school isn’t complete unless I start the day off by greeting all our families outside as they come onto campus. Not only do I benefit from seeing my students’ smiling faces each morning, it is a great time to chat with parents and build a sense of community within our neighborhood.

How do you get to know students even though you don’t have your own classroom?
In addition to visiting classrooms frequently, I spend time with students during arrival and dismissal, and lunch and recess.

Also, each month we focus on one scholarly habit, such as excellence, perseverance, respect, or risk-taking. When students are recognized for going above and beyond in one of our scholarly habits, their teacher submits a special form. We then call the student to the office and phone a family member with the great news. The student gets a chance to speak with family about his or her accomplishments before going back to class. It is such a celebration between the student, their family, and the office staff, and parents are thrilled to be receiving a positive call from school!

Tell us about a time that a teacher evaluation didn’t go as expected — for better or for worse?
Teacher evaluation has truly changed for the better in the last four years. Our teachers are engaged in cycles of observation and feedback about every three weeks. Teachers are observed and provided a bite-sized action step that they practice along with the administrator during the debrief session. We then return to the classroom to see the action step in place and provide teachers with additional feedback. This process has allowed us to develop our teachers in a way that is motivating.

What is an effort you’ve spearheaded at your school that you’re particularly proud of?
I believe that a strong culture is a crucial element in a school. When leaders create a vibrant and joyful environment, staff will be more willing to work hard because they feel respected and valued. We have made this a true focus at Riverdale Elementary, celebrating teachers and scholars wholeheartedly.

We began this process by creating a new mission statement: “At Riverdale Elementary we are career-bound scholars going from good to better to best to achieve success.” We also have a school chant: “Good better best, Never let it rest, Till your good is better, And your better is best!” Each day during morning announcements our mission statement and school chant are cheered by both staff and scholars.

How do you handle discipline when students get into trouble?
When students make a choice that is not best for them, it is critical to teach them how to make a better choice next time. We work together to identify what the student needs, and at the same time we provide them with a plan that leaves them with a sense of personal responsibility and the confidence to make sound decisions.

What is the hardest part of your job?
Just as I have very high expectations for my staff and our students, I set the same standards for myself as a building principal. At times, there is so much on my plate that it is important to prioritize to meet the needs of all my stakeholders.

What’s the best advice you ever received?
When I was growing up, my mother would often say, “Today is the first day of the rest of your life.” I interpreted this quote to mean that each and every day is a gift, and it is up to you to decide how you will use it.