Chalkbeat

Welcome to Chalkbeat Indiana, your new home for education news

Dear readers,

We are very excited to introduce Chalkbeat Indiana, a news site focused on delivering you the most relevant news about education policy and practice right here in our community.

Since first soft-launching on Oct. 21, we have leapt right to work writing stories about State Superintendent Glenda Ritz’s battle with Gov. Mike Pence, Indianapolis Public Schools, and more. And (as you can see) we’ve been building a lovely new website to improve your reading experience.

This is a critical period of change for Indiana schools. Lawmakers continue to push to expand their efforts to make educational change through school choice and new statewide changes to the way teachers are judged, students are taught, and schools are graded.

We plan to cover the action and inaction, keeping policymakers, educators, and the public informed as well as accountable. To do that, we have selected four areas of focus for the year: implementation of the Common Core, the expansion of private school vouchers, a new effort to overhaul Indianapolis Public Schools, and major changes to the way teachers are evaluated.

Chalkbeat readers will get in-depth information about:

  • Common Core: Indiana was an early adopter of these new guidelines, which all but a handful of states have agreed to follow. But lawmakers now have second thoughts. All the state’s schools have adopted Common Core standards through second grade and some already have them in all grades. But state policymakers are taking another look and a vote next summer will decide if Indiana continues with Common Core or forges its own standards.
  • Vouchers: Indiana has the fastest-growing private school voucher program in history. With more than 20,000 students using tax dollars to attend private schools through vouchers in the program’s third year, only Wisconsin’s 20-year-old program has more. The swift changes present a host of challenges—both for the public schools that have lost students and the private schools that have gained them.
  • Teacher evaluation: This spring, all Indiana teachers will have undergone new, tougher evaluations of their work. The stakes are high: supporters of the evaluations argue that they will be key in improving student achievement, but exactly what will happen is unknown. Teachers face more observation from supervisors, and the test scores of their students will be scrutinized. For the first time, those test scores will play a role in determining pay raises for most teachers.
  • Indianapolis Public Schools: IPS is entering its second year under a new school board majority that is determined to make changes to the way the district operates. It has a new superintendent, Lewis Ferebee, who is promising a reform plan early this year. The district also faces a multimillion-dollar budget deficit that could force school closings before next fall.

But our stories will be strongest if we get your help. Here are a few ways to pitch in:

Soon we will be hiring a community editor, who will be creating more opportunities for you to share your experiences and help deepen our coverage of public schools. To start, please consider submitting to our First Person section, which highlights the experiences of teachers, administrators, students, policymakers, and parents. To find out more or pitch an idea, e-mail bureau chief Scott Elliott at [email protected]

Another way to share your experiences and thoughts with us is through our comments section. Here is a look at our new comments policy, which we will be enforcing aggressively with the help of our engagement director, Anika Anand. We want Chalkbeat Indiana to be a place where educators, policymakers and families can come to voice their concerns, talk to one another and ultimately, act in a way that leads to better schools for everyone. So please, be courteous and respectful in your comments so that we can all learn something from each other.

Here are some other ways to stay up to date on our reporting and help us make our reporting the best it can be:

  • Sign up for our morning Rise & Shine newsletter, which includes the day’s major education headlines in Indiana and nationally.
  • Follow us on Twitter @ChalkbeatIN and Like us on Facebook
  • Got a story idea for us? Send an e-mail to [email protected]
  • Fill out our survey to tell us what stories you want to read and learn more about Chalkbeat.

Happy reading,

Scott Elliott, Chalkbeat Indiana bureau chief

Elizabeth Green, Chalkbeat editor-in-chief

Student count

Aurora school enrollment continues sharp decline, but budget woes not expected

A kindergarten teacher at Kenton Elementary in Aurora helps a student practice saying and writing numbers on a Thursday afternoon in February. (Photo by Yesenia Robles, Chalkbeat)

The number of students enrolled in Aurora schools this fall dropped by almost twice as much as last year, part of a trend district officials have blamed in part on gentrification as housing prices in Aurora climb.

This year, as of Oct. 2, the district has enrolled 41,294 students from preschool through 12th grade. That’s 867 fewer students than last year — and almost twice the number of students lost between 2015 and 2016.

Last October, staff told the board that district enrollment had dropped by a historic amount. At the time, enrollment was 41,926, down 643 from 2015. By the end of the 2016-17 school year, the district had enrolled almost 200 more students.

But in Colorado, school districts are given money on a per-student count that’s based on the number of students enrolled on count day, which this year was Oct. 2.

The district expects to see a similar decline in students again next school year, but expects that new developments start bringing more children to the district in the future.

The good news, provided in the update given to the Aurora school board Tuesday night, is that district officials saw it coming this time.

“The magnitude of the impact is not the same as last year,” said Superintendent Rico Munn. “This kind of decline is now something we will predict and budget to.”

Because enrollment numbers are higher than what officials predicted, the budget that the board approved over the summer should not need adjustments for the current year.

Last year, Aurora Public Schools had to cut more than $3 million in the middle of the year. District officials also worked on gathering input and finding ways to shrink the 2017-18 budget by up to $31 million, but better than expected funding from the state meant the district didn’t end up cutting the full $31 million.

The district may look for ways to trim the budget again next year in anticipation of another anticipated enrollment decline.

Board members asked about other factors that may be contributing to enrollment declines, such as school reputations, and asked about how staff predict future enrollment.

Superintendent Munn told the board that the enrollment decreases are changing several conversations in the district.

“APS was not in the business of marketing our schools,” Munn said. But this year, the district launched an interactive map with school information on the district website to help feature all schools, their programs and their performance measures, and has been doing outreach to the approximately 4,000 Aurora students who leave to attend neighboring districts.

Three schools also received district-level help in creating targeted marketing.

One of those three schools was South Middle School, a low-performing school in the northwest part of the district where enrollment declines are especially drastic.

This year, after receiving some marketing assistance, South was one of few schools in the district that saw enrollment increased. The school’s Oct. 2 enrollment was 825, up from 734 last year.

Weekend Reads

Need classroom decor inspiration? These educators have got you covered.

This school year, students will spend about 1,000 hours in school —making their classrooms a huge part of their learning experience.

We’re recognizing educators who’ve poured on the pizazz to make students feel welcome. From a 9th-grade “forensics lab” decked out in caution tape to a classroom stage complete with lights to get first graders pumped about public speaking, these crafty teachers have gone above and beyond to create great spaces.

Got a classroom of your own to show off? Know someone that should be on this list? Let us know!

Jaclyn Flores, First Grade Dual Language, Rochester, New York
“Having a classroom that is bright, cheerful, organized and inviting allows my students to feel pride in their classroom as well as feel welcome. My students look forward to standing on the stage to share or sitting on special chairs to dive into their learning. This space is a safe place for my students and we take pride in what it has become.”

Jasmine, Pre-K, Las Vegas, Nevada
“My classroom environment helps my students because providing calming colors and a home-like space makes them feel more comfortable in the classroom and ready to learn as first-time students!”

 

Oneika Osborne, 10th Grade Reading, Miami Southridge Senior High School, Miami, Florida
“My classroom environment invites all of my students to constantly be in a state of celebration and self-empowerment at all points of the learning process. With inspirational quotes, culturally relevant images, and an explosion of color, my classroom sets the tone for the day every single day as soon as we walk in. It is one of optimism, power, and of course glitter.”

Kristen Poindexter, Kindergarten, Spring Mill Elementary School, Indianapolis, Indiana
“I try very hard to make my classroom a place where memorable experiences happen. I use songs, finger plays, movement, and interactive activities to help cement concepts in their minds. It makes my teacher heart so happy when past students walk by my classroom and start their sentence with, “Remember when we…?”. We recently transformed our classroom into a Mad Science Lab where we investigated more about our 5 Senses.”

 

Brittany, 9th Grade Biology, Dallas, Texas
“I love my classroom environment because I teach Biology, it’s easy to relate every topic back to Forensics and real-life investigations! Mystery always gets the students going!”

 

Ms. Heaton, First Grade, Westampton, New Jersey
“As an educator, it is my goal to create a classroom environment that is positive and welcoming for students. I wanted to create a learning environment where students feel comfortable and in return stimulates student learning. A classroom is a second home for students so I wanted to ensure that the space was bright, friendly, and organized for the students to be able to use each and every day.”

D’Essence Grant, 8th Grade ELA, KIPP Houston, Houston, Texas
“Intentionally decorating my classroom was my first act of showing my students I care about them. I pride myself on building relationships with my students and them knowing I care about them inside and outside of the classroom. Taking the time to make the classroom meaningful and creative as well building a safe place for our community helps establish an effective classroom setting.”

 

Jayme Wiertzema, Elementary Art, Worthington, Minnesota
“I’m looking forward to having a CLASSROOM this year. The past two years I have taught from a cart and this year my amazing school district allowed me to have a classroom in our school that is busting at the seams! I’m so excited to use my classroom environment to inspire creativity in my students, get to know them and learn from their amazing imaginations in art class!”

 

Melissa Vecchio, 4th Grade, Queens, New York
“Since so much of a student’s time is spent inside their classroom, the environment should be neat, organized, easy to move around in but most of all positive. I love to use a theme to reinforce great behavior. I always give the students a choice in helping to design bulletin boards and desk arrangements. When they are involved they take pride in the classroom, and enjoy being there.”