School closings

Broad Ripple High School will probably close next year. Here’s what you should know.

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Students from Broad Ripple attended a meeting in April about high school closing plans.

Broad Ripple High School could graduate its last class of seniors this spring — more than a century after it began educating students.

The second oldest high school in Indianapolis Public Schools, Broad Ripple is one of three IPS high schools slated to close at the end of the year under a plan released by Superintendent Lewis Ferebee last month. The IPS board is expected to vote on the proposal in September.

The board will have a meeting 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at Broad Ripple, which will begin with 90 minutes for public comment on the high school plan. The deadline to sign up online to speak is noon Tuesday.

There are some strong reasons to keep Broad Ripple open, but there also are practical factors that likely influenced the administration’s recommendation to close the school.

Here are some reasons to keep Broad Ripple open:

  • Broad Ripple has deeply loyal alumni, parents and students who have strongly advocated for the school in recent months. (The alumni include IPS board member Kelly Bentley.)
  • The school is doing relatively well academically — it received a C grade from the state last year — and the district estimates that the graduation rate for the class of 2017 will be 97.6 percent, one of the highest in the district.
  • It’s home to a beloved visual and performing arts magnet program that attracts students from across the district. Under the administration proposal, that program would continue to operate at Shortridge High School.

Here are some reasons Broad Ripple is facing closure:

  • The school is expected to be just 25 percent full this fall, with 591 students in a building designed to fit 2,400.
  • The cost of operating the Broad Ripple campus is slightly less than the district average at $1,234 per student, but by increasing enrollment at the remaining four schools, the district will almost certainly reduce those costs.
  • The four schools the administration recommended keeping are near downtown, which IPS says will make transportation easier and cheaper for the all-magnet model. Broad Ripple is at the far northern edge of the district, and it would be a long commute for many students.
  • In fact, because the arts magnet attracts students from across IPS, bus rides average 7.39 miles — the longest of any high school and nearly double the district average.
  • Finally, Broad Ripple is located in a thriving area where development is booming, making it one of the most valuable properties the district owns. The district expects it could sell the property for $6 million to $8 million.

Correction (July 18, 2017): This story has been updated to reflect that Broad Ripple High School was not built in 1923, as stated in the IPS high school closing report. That was the year the school, which was founded decades earlier, joined the district.

with interest

Closed charter school using private funds to issue unpaid teachers their summer paychecks

PHOTO: Erin Einhorn
Matchbook Learning CEO Sajan George sent a letter to teachers from Michigan Technical Academy on Monday saying there may be ways to make sure they get paid for work performed during the school year.

Teachers at a recently closed charter school received a letter today saying they would in fact receive the summer paychecks they are due for work performed during the school year.

Teachers at the Michigan Technical Academy were told last month that money that was supposed to pay them would instead go to pay off the school’s debts. In an email at the time, the school’s management company, Matchbook Learning, said the matter was out of its control.

Company CEO Sajan George sent followup letters to update the situation, including one at the end of July describing attempts to find other ways to pay teachers.

But attempts to recoup funds that were going to pay debts failed or were too slow. So the company decided to pay teachers out of its own funding, using private donations to foot the bill, George said in today’s letter. 

“Even though Matchbook has not been paid itself in the past five months, we have come up with the money to make our employees whole,” George wrote. “Matchbook will continue to pursue the funding owed to us, but whether we receive it or not, we are using this funding from private sources to fulfill our commitment to you.”

A payment made, with interest, this week to cover two previous paychecks, and another final payment will be made on Aug. 30, according to the letter. Here’s the letter he sent:

August 22, 2017
Dear Former Employee:

As I’ve related in my previous letters, we have been doing everything possible to get you the summer pay you’re owed.

We’ve had little success, as the bond holders have insisted on taking the July and August State Aid payments entirely for themselves. The Michigan Finance Authority has informed us that, while they are sympathetic, they can offer no assistance. CMU has offered no help. And working through the court system to get a Receiver appointed is going to take
longer than we thought – too long to benefit the people who need these payments to be able to make ends meet.

So we are paying you ourselves. Even though Matchbook has not been paid itself in the past five months, we have come up with the money to make our employees whole. Funds have been made available, through the generosity of our supporters, to pay employees the summer pay they are due. Matchbook will continue to pursue the funding owed to us, but whether we receive it or not, we are using this funding from private sources to fulfill our commitment to you.

We have already ordered payments to be made via direct deposit from our payroll processing vendor Paychex into your bank accounts that Paychex has on file from our last payroll run.

Payments covering what was owed from July 30th and August 15th, should be deposited into your bank accounts today and tomorrow – with interest from those dates. Your final payment will be made before it is due on August 30th by the end of this week. Any questions can be directed to [email protected]

We are a small nonprofit organization, but we feel an overriding commitment to the people who worked so hard to benefit our students all year. We know this has been a challenging process, but I’m pleased at least to be able to provide you with the pay you deserve.

Thank you very much.
Sincerely,

Sajan George
Founder & CEO, Matchbook Learning, a non-profit corporation

High school years

‘Fall was a big buildup of school spirit’: A Northwest alumnus remembers pep rallies, school plays, and some tension along the way, too.

PHOTO: Courtesy of Bill Franklin
Bill Franklin, Northwest High School Class of 1980, as a high-schooler (left) and as an adult (right).

In September, the board of Indianapolis Public Schools will vote on a proposal to close four high schools in the district. Chalkbeat is collecting narratives from former students and teachers from Arlington, Broad Ripple, John Marshall, and Northwest.

Want to share your own memories from one of these schools? Fill out this form.

(This interview has been edited for length and clarity)

Bill Franklin, Northwest High School Class of 1980

Member, Class of 1980 reunion committee

Question: Can you tell us something about your memories from high school?
Answer: Northwest High School was a big part of my growing up. The neighborhood I lived in was right next door to the school, so it was within walking distance. And I have two older brothers who went to Northwest before me. So going to the football games on Friday nights was always a big thrilling event for me, going over to watch band practices and things like that. It was just a very good place to grow up, a very good school to go to at the time.

Q. What was the school like back then?
A. I was one of these weirdo kids who was always excited when the school year started, as opposed to ‘Oh no, summer’s over!’ Because it was a chance to go back to see the friends that you typically didn’t see over the summer, there was always new clothes to wear, and always the excitement of finding out what your classes were going to be like.

The fall was just a big buildup of school spirit because of the football games, and they would have pep rallies, and there was always the part of the pep rally where they would have the freshmen class make as much noise as they could, and then the sophomore class, and so on, and then it was judged who had the most spirit, which class it was. It was just always a good time.

Having said that, our school ratio honestly back then was probably 60 percent black and 40 percent white, so there were a couple years where there was a lot of tension early in the school year between black and white students. Sometimes it would be on the news. I do remember coming home from school one time and my mom asked me if anything had happened at the school and I said, ‘Not that I’m aware of.’ She said, ‘Well, the neighbor heard on the news that they were having problems at Northwest, some students threw rocks at a bus that was busing in black students from Indianapolis.’ And I said, ‘I don’t know anything about it.’ (Franklin is white.)

That always seemed to be that way, just briefly at the beginning of the school year. I don’t know why, I never experienced anything myself. What was interesting was, like the cafeteria, it was kind of an unspoken or unwritten thing that the majority of the white students would sit on one side of the cafeteria and the majority of the black students would sit on the other. I thought that was kind of interesting, but again, I didn’t notice any trouble with that.

Q. Was this tension ever acknowledged by the school?
A. I just don’t think it was acknowledged. Maybe the administration just (thought) you know, as long as there’s nothing really going on with that, we’ll leave it alone. They didn’t want to get too involved in it. And like I said, it always worked itself out. Going through the hallways, between classes, I never saw anything, I never felt threatened. It was actually a good school to go to, I enjoyed it.

Q. What groups or clubs were you involved in?
A. The school curriculum was, you had to have at least one year of physical education, and so I did my one year and got out. I’m just not a sports-minded individual. Both of my brothers were, they played football all through high school, and I remember my dad telling me that when I got to high school, I’d be involved in some sort of sport activity. And I didn’t want to be. I got really involved in the arts – the art department, choir, theater, show choir. My parents noticed that I really enjoyed it, and did very well with it, and was very happy.

I remember absolutely every show I was in. We always did a fall play and a spring musical. I remember every play and musical I was in and whatever character I played. And Northwest was a fantastic school to do that in, because they have one of the largest auditoriums for a public school. So it was fun performing there, it was just great. The camaraderie in the theater department and the music department was really good.

In my junior year of high school, we did the fall play ‘The Glass Menagerie,’ and I was cast as the lead character, Tom. That was my biggest thing, being in that play as the lead. My junior year, we did the musical ‘Once Upon A Mattress,’ and I played the minstrel. My character was the very first character out on stage, and did a big solo number. We ended up taking that musical to state competition and we got number one musical in the state of Indiana.

Q. What did you think when you heard about the plan to convert Northwest into a middle school?
A. Well, I do know that the people on the (Class of 1980) reunion committee, when we first heard about Northwest closing, everyone was kind of in shock and sad to hear that, because it really was a good school back in our day. But we all knew that their enrollment had declined, and we had heard some of the wings weren’t even being used because they didn’t have the students they used to.

I live in Hendricks County. Everybody I know (from Northwest), nobody lives there, they don’t even have kids or grandkids who go there. So I don’t think a whole lot of people in my group are really affected by it, other than, it’s just sad to hear.