Indiana online schools

After years of failing grades, Hoosier Academy Virtual will close in June

PHOTO: Scott Elliott
Hoosier Academy-Indianapolis is a hybrid school at which some student work is done online and some at the school.

The Hoosier Academy school board voted Tuesday night to not renew the charter of its full-time online school after months of scrutiny from the state, dropping enrollment, and poor academic performance.

Hoosier Academy Virtual Charter School will close after June 30. The board will continue to operate its two other schools, the hybrid Hoosier Academy-Indianapolis, where students learn online and in-person at a brick-and-mortar school, and Insight School of Indiana, which is geared toward students with more intensive needs.

John Marske, board chairman, told Chalkbeat in an email that the board did not think the school could meet the requirements to get its charter renewed. The school is authorized by Ball State University and operated by the for-profit K12 Inc.

“If we were to seek renewal, we would have had to submit a renewal application by October 1, 2017,” Marske said. He noted that “the Board has seen evidence of significant improvement at Hoosier Virtual,” but didn’t feel that academics were strong enough “to pass the rigors of a new charter application process.”

The school’s leader, Byron Ernest, also an Indiana State Board of Education member, did not immediately return requests for comment. Bob Marra, who directs charter school efforts at Ball State, said he was not immediately available to speak.

Marske said the board is now focused on alerting and addressing questions from the families of the 2,065 students enrolled in grades K-12 and its almost 100 teachers.

“Our intention is to give our families and teachers as many options as possible,” Marske said. “Meanwhile we are also focused on improving results of the Hoosier Hybrid school in Indianapolis, as well as the Hoosier Insight school.”

According to minutes from Hoosier Academy’s July board meeting (the most recent posted by the school), Hoosier Virtual saw a drop of about 800 students from its enrollment of 2,867 a year ago. The Insight School enrolled 593 as of July, and the hybrid school enrolled 199.

Hoosier Academy Virtual escaped closure in May when the Indiana State Board of Education voted to allow the school to remain open despite years of poor test scores and F grades. The board also decided not to allow them to enroll new students and reduced fees paid to Ball State to authorize the school.

This is the full text of the resolution the board passed last night at its monthly meeting:

 

HOOSIER ACADEMY, INC.

Resolution Regarding Charter Renewal – Virtual Charter School

Resolution No. 2017 – [ ]

WHEREAS, in 2016 Ball State University Office of Charter Schools (the “Sponsor”) reauthorized Hoosier Academy, Inc. (the “Corporation”) to operate the Hoosier Academy Virtual Charter School (“Virtual School”) for an additional two year charter term, and the Corporation and Sponsor entered into a Charter agreement (“Charter Agreement”) for a Charter term ending June 30, 2018; and

WHEREAS, pursuant to the Charter Agreement and the Sponsor policies, if the Charter has not been renewed and the Corporation wishes to renew the Charter, the Corporation must initiate the renewal process by filing a written request for renewal with the Executive Director of the Sponsor no later than October 1 in the last academic year before expiration of the then current term of the Charter; and

WHEREAS, the Board of Directors, with input from its educational management company, K12 Classroom, LLC, and the Head of Schools for the Hoosier Academy Virtual Charter School, has continued to implement various initiatives, programs and offerings for the Virtual School  to enhance the opportunity for student success and increase overall success rate of students as measured by State assessment protocols, but after careful consideration and assessment of school operations, educational results, and the interests of its students and the community served by the Virtual School, the Board deems it to not be in the interest of the Virtual School or its students or community served by the Virtual School to seek renewal of the Charter; and

WHEREAS, the Board believes it is very important at this time to focus continued improvement efforts on the Hoosier Academy Indianapolis School hybrid/blended program and the Insight School of Indiana both of which are operated by the Corporation, and the Board, in concert with its Sponsor, Ball State University Office of Charter School and its educational management company, K12, Classroom, LLC, will be working to further identify best practices and lessons learned from the success and challenges of the Virtual School over the past several years of its existence to develop new and improved opportunities for students in our network of schools.

IT IS THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Board of Directors hereby authorizes, confirms and approves the decision to not pursue renewal of the Charter for the Virtual School beyond the term ending June 30, 2018, and to not submit a request for renewal of the Charter to its Sponsor; and

IT IS RESOLVED FURTHER that the Board President and the Head of Schools, be and hereby are, authorized to coordinate and work with the Sponsor to ensure timely notification to parents and a smooth and orderly closure and transition for students and parents, in accordance with all applicable laws and as guided by and consistent with the School Closure Plan Implementation protocol adopted by the Sponsor, Ball State University Office of Charter Schools.

Indiana online schools

Former Indiana schools chief Glenda Ritz: Virtual schools ‘prey’ on vulnerable students

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos
State Superintendent Glenda Ritz talks with reporters following an Indiana State Board of Education meeting in 2016.

As far as former state Superintendent Glenda Ritz is concerned, full-time online schools are “a failed alternative” to traditional schools.

In response to a Chalkbeat investigation of Indiana Virtual School published late last month, Ritz argued in an Indianapolis Business Journal column that virtual learning has its place in the classroom, but most of the time, online charter schools can’t meet the needs of their students.

Chalkbeat found that at Indiana Virtual School, a fast-growing online school which has already opened a second Indiana school, student-to-teacher ratios are sky-high and few students graduate. The school was also charged millions of dollars by its founder’s former company to manage the school, a set-up which has raised ethical questions.

She continued:

“Virtual learning has its place in all of our schools to deepen learning, enhance practice skills, and provide access to information. However, virtual learning should not be offered to students, using taxpayer money, as a complete alternative to school.

The key word is “school.” If you have not read the Oct. 31 special report from Chalkbeat titled, ‘As students signed up, online school hired barely any teachers — but founder’s company charged it millions,’ then you should. Not-for-profit companies like the one mentioned in the article make a lot of money getting chartered as a school and spending your tax dollars while failing to provide quality education to some of our most vulnerable students.

In Indiana, in the name of ‘choice,’ legislative leaders take money from these companies. These companies want to be able to effectively lobby for more state money to prey on our most vulnerable students through exclusive opportunities to capture more of the virtual education space.”

Since leaving office, Ritz has started her own consulting company, Advancing Public Schools. The organization works with public school district boards to promote their schools’ work and analyze and fill gaps in literacy and reading programs.

You can read the entire column here and find Chalkbeat’s investigation here.

 

behind the story

Few teachers, low scores, and ethical questions. Behind our Indiana Virtual School investigation.

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos
A view outside of Indiana Virtual School's office, located in an office park at the northern edge of Marion County.

In the week since we published our investigation into Indiana Virtual School, thousands of people have learned about the school’s poor performance, unorthodox spending, and ineffective oversight. (If you need a refresher, this Twitter thread might help.)

Now, we’re taking you behind the story with an interview between Shaina Cavazos, the reporter who dug into Indiana Virtual School over the course of more than seven months, and Matt Barnum, Chalkbeat’s national reporter, who is keeping a close eye on where virtual schools stand across the country.

Read on to hear about the challenges Shaina encountered, the reaction so far, what comes next, and how you can help.

Matt: How did you decide to look into this school? What challenges did you run into?

Shaina: I actually started reporting on virtual schools more than a year ago when another school, Hoosier Academy Virtual, was up for state sanctions. I wanted to figure out what virtual schools were like given that they enroll about 1 percent of students in Indiana.

Once I looked past the schools backed by the big-name national organizations, I realized Indiana Virtual was just as large and growing incredibly fast — but few people I talked to were familiar with it. So I started digging.

Reporting about the school became difficult once the school stopped responding to a lot of the questions I was asking. It meant that even for finding out things as basic as their current enrollment, I had to find other sources of data and information. I did a lot of formal requests for records, and I worked quite a bit with the state department of education’s data team to figure out what data was out there and how I could access it. I couldn’t always get documents, but usually I found out that the law said I had a right to them. It pushed me to learn about what documents were available to me because I knew few things stood in the way of what I should be able to get legally.

What has the reaction been?

I don’t think the school is happy with the story, but they haven’t agreed to a conversation about it.

In general, schools want to talk about their students who are successful, which I get. But a lot of students at this school are not successful, according to the state’s expectations. We can’t ignore that. We need to talk about those students and make sure they’re receiving an education and not just being enrolled somewhere.

I’m still talking to people who could take action to get their reaction. Intervention from the state board is still a few years away, if it happens at all, and the education department has not indicated they’re going to be doing anything in particular to this situation even though our state superintendent has spoken out about a need for more monitoring of online schools.

That leaves lawmakers. I’ve talked to some Democrats who are outraged about what’s going on, but they aren’t the party in power here — Republicans have a majority in both houses.

I’m still reaching out to lawmakers on both sides to talk about what might happen next. But ultimately, they created the system, so they’re the ones who can most easily change it.

Why was this story important for Chalkbeat to do?

At Chalkbeat, we’re focused on writing about students who have historically lacked access to a quality education. We’re always looking at our stories through a lens of equity — who isn’t being served? Many of students at this virtual school come from families living in poverty. While it’s not as racially or ethnically diverse as schools in a lot of the districts we write about, many students have disabilities or are learning English for the first time. And in a lot of cases, they aren’t getting the support they need to be successful.

Why should a reader outside of Indiana read your article?

You might not be aware of it, but something like this could be happening in your state too. Thirty-four states have virtual schools.

A lot of them have gone through something similar — Ohio is one example, and so is Colorado. It’s something we’re only going to see become more of an issue. Specifically talking about Indiana Virtual School, well, they are expanding, with schools in the works in Michigan and Texas.

Also, Betsy DeVos, our U.S. secretary of education, has promoted online schools. When the nation’s top education official is signing off on something, I’d say that makes scrutiny pretty important.

What comes next?

A top priority is to hold officials in Indiana accountable for reading and responding to the story. I’m working on that now, and when I learn more I’ll report back.

I’m also trying to learn even more about what it’s like for students in online schools — Indiana Virtual or others. I put a survey in the article so people could tell me their stories, and now I’m just trying to get the word out.

Find our investigation here.