west side story

Backing her kid’s school, actress Cynthia Nixon joins UWS war

A resolution to move an Upper West Side middle school passed on Wednesday night, but not before Cynthia Nixon — “Sex and the City” actress, Alliance for Quality Education spokeswoman, and parent at the school — was shouted down briefly during a heated public comment session.

Nixon was stepping into a fight that has been raging on the Upper West Side for months. The fight began as a discussion about how to deal with overcrowding at public schools but has spiraled into a raging debate about class and race and privilege in Upper Manhattan.

Confrontations have gotten incredibly emotional — and personal: On this site, a commenter posing as Cynthia Nixon’s fictional son, Brady, from “Sex and the City” accused his “mom” of hypocrisy. And parents at Nixon’s school, called the Center School, have charged another school’s parents with racism and class prejudice, citing postings from last January on the Urban Baby Web site that called Center School students “thugs.”

At issue is a plan that would move the Center School from its current home inside a larger elementary school on West 70th Street, PS 199. Supporters of the plan tout it as an easy way to relieve crowding at the elementary school, which is growing so quickly that parents fear it will not have room to hold their younger children.

Opponents, including Nixon, argue that moving the Center School exacerbates segregation by race and class. (PS 199, a zoned school, is two-thirds white, while the Center School, which draws its students from throughout the district, is half white and has a higher proportion of black and Hispanic students.)

If the plan becomes official, which it almost certainly will after Wednesday’s vote, the Center School will move to another school building several blocks away.

Nixon and other Center School parents have vehemently opposed the plan for months, making fliers and using the school’s Web site to organize protests. They also delivered passionate testimony at the meeting Wednesday, choosing Nixon and another mother to represent their cause.

In her short remarks, captured in the video above, Nixon argued that there is a stark difference between the demographic of the Center School and the “increasingly white and increasingly affluent” elementary school it shares space with. Moving the Center School away, she said, would lead to a “de facto segregated building on 70th Street.”

The Upper West Side school war began in September, when the city Department of Education suggested two plans for how the Upper West Side could relieve crowding.

One would have moved 30 percent of students to new schools. But the local parent council that has final authority over zoning matters last week indicated that it would back a much tamer plan. That one would move only a handful of students, keep siblings in the same school, and, most controversially, relocate two schools. One of those schools, Anderson, a gifted school that pulls students from across the city, agreed to a move. The other, the Center School, where Cynthia Nixon is a parent, has spent weeks fighting tooth and nail against the plan.

The people booing Nixon were led by a growing group of parents who are zoned for PS 199 but fear that increasing crowding could make the school too packed to have room for their children. If the Center School moves out of their building, that will shore up space for their children at PS 199. These parents, who have maintained a Web site that some say contains misinformation, turned out in large numbers to the meeting on Wednesday. (Below the jump, view a video of their spokesman, Eric Shuffler, speaking out at the meeting; he, too, was booed.)

But Nixon’s contingent was by far the largest. It included not only by Center School parents but also parents from at least four neighborhood schools, who echoed Nixon’s argument about diversity. The group walked out in protest as the council prepared to vote. A number of PS 199 parents who said they supported the Center School joined them.

Also walking out — at times to shouts of “Yes, we can” — were parents from the Computer School, a middle school whose building will be Anderson’s new home, and PS 75, a diverse elementary school whose zone was trimmed in the resolution.

Council members said they had no authority to involve issues of diversity in the rezoning process. “The [Community Education Council] does value diversity. We’ve talked about it,” CEC 3 member Jennifer Freeman told me after the meeting. “We were working with the tools available to us so the main topic in this conversation had to be overcrowding. We would welcome the opportunity to talk about diversity more.”

During the meeting, one council member explained that she wanted to deal with issues of race and class segregation in the district but that now was not the right time to do so.

“If not now, when?” audience members shouted at her.

That council member, Danielle Moss Lee, ultimately abstained from voting. She was the only council member present who did not vote in favor of the resolution.

just deserts

These New York City neighborhoods have relatively few charter schools, according to a new report

PHOTO: Thomas B. Fordham Institute

New York has plenty of charter schools — 225 just serving elementary-school students at the most recent count.

But advocates for the schools, which are publicly funded but privately managed, say some parts of the city have disproportionately few, considering that they are home to the poor students the schools are intended to serve.

In a new report, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute calls attention to “charter school deserts,” which it defines as “three or more contiguous census tracts that have poverty rates greater than 20 percent but that have no charter schools.”

In New York City, according to the report, parts of Harlem, the Bronx, and central Brooklyn meet the desert criteria. So do parts of Buffalo, Albany, and Rochester upstate.

The report makes the case that geography constrains many families’ ability to choose schools, so having relatively few charter schools could mean that families do not have access to school choice — one of the Fordham Institute’s top priorities.

In New York City, the dynamic is different because transportation is widely available, and many families choose to travel some distance to access the schools they want. In addition, because of the city’s large and dense population, census tracts are relatively small, meaning that a student without a charter school in his or her own tract might in fact live near a charter school anyway.

The report scanned all 42 states that allow charter schools for deserts and found them in 39, particularly in areas just outside of city boundaries where low-income families have moved because of gentrification. Its authors say the analysis is meant to help policy makers, charter operators, and parents alike.

“Policymakers and parents can use this information to better understand the supply of schooling options in their states and cities — and to press for changes that would improve that supply,” the report reads. “Charter operators and authorizers may also find this analysis helpful as they consider where to establish new schools.”

Whether New York City and state need more charter schools is a contested topic in Albany, where lawmakers have set limits about how many of the schools can operate. Last year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposed changing the charter school cap so that more schools could open in New York City, but that proposal did not advance, meaning that the city can add only about 30 more schools without bumping up against the limit.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, on the other hand, has long said the city has “a good dynamic right now with the cap the way it is.”

Having charter schools nearby can strain city-run schools for space, enrollment, and resources — a dynamic that charter advocates say is essential to ensuring that schools face competitive pressure to serve students effectively.

Headlines

In smaller gun violence protests, hundreds of students walk out of NYC schools to mark Columbine anniversary

PHOTO: Drew Angerer
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 20: Student activists rally against gun violence at Washington Square Park, near the campus of New York University, April 20, 2018 in New York City. On the anniversary of the 1999 Columbine High School mass shooting, student activists across the country are participating in school walkouts to demand action on gun reform. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

From Brooklyn to the Bronx, students left their classrooms Friday to protest gun violence in demonstrations that were smaller but no less than passionate than last month’s massive walkout.

This time around, school officials weren’t giving a free pass to students for skipping school to protest — the Department of Education said there could be repercussions and Chancellor Richard Carranza urged students to stay in class because “you don’t have to be out of school all day to make your voices known. You’ve already made your voices known.”

According to the Department of Education, attendance on Friday was 89.89 percent, down just slightly from Thursday’s attendance of 91.36 percent. But that number might not account for students who briefly left school to attend protests after the school day started.

The walkout was designed to protest gun violence and planned for the 19th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting.

Many of the demonstrators gathered in Washington Square Park for a “die-in.” But other students stayed close to home, such as the School for Global Leaders on the Lower East Side. Here are some photos and videos shared on Twitter that give a sense of the walkout’s scope in New York.