exchange students

De Blasio’s district-charter partnerships start with a focus on school discipline

PHOTO: Patrick Wall
Deputy Chancellor Phil Weinberg.

Anthony Pirro has a vision for what discipline could look like at P.S. 54, the elementary school he runs in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

Students who misbehave would be pulled aside to analyze their decisions. If they had disrupted class, they would apologize to others. Suspensions would be used only as a last resort.

But so far, the push toward restorative justice hasn’t worked, Pirro explained Thursday. Less than half of his teachers are on board, and trying to rally the parent-teacher association this year has been an “epic fail.”

His latest tactic: Getting advice from The Equity Project Charter School through a new program that pairs up New York City district and charter schools. The new partnerships — which the city expects to spend $18 million to support over the next four years — are one part of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s “Equity and Excellence” plan, a long-term agenda he outlined in September to reshape public schools.

Pirro visited The Equity Project in Washington Heights Thursday alongside a number of other city education officials for the program’s second meeting.

“It just might prod people to think a little bit more widely,” Deputy Chancellor Phil Weinberg said. “The original idea of why we would have charter schools was to innovate practice.”

These partnerships are also an extension of the collaborative learning approach championed by Chancellor Carmen Fariña, who has made her “Learning Partners” program a centerpiece of her plan to improve New York City’s schools. They are also designed to bring together two kinds of schools that often grab headlines for sparking tension, not sharing ideas.

So far, 20 district and charter schools are participating, with some of each designated as “mentor” schools and others as “learner” schools. Half are working to improve instruction for students learning English, while the other half tackle discipline issues.

On Thursday morning, school leaders bounced new ideas around for Pirro. Maybe he should focus his efforts on convincing teachers on the verge of supporting the new approach, one said. Another suggested his message would be more effective coming from fellow teachers.

The initiative mirrors past efforts in the city and across the country to foster charter-district conversations. The Gates Foundation gave $25 million in 2012 to seven different cities, including New York, to help charter and district schools share ideas about enrollment systems, metrics, and professional development. (Chalkbeat also receives support from the Gates Foundation.)

The city’s initiative is set to reach more partnerships over the next five years, but there is no concrete vision for what the program will look like over that time, Weinberg said. There is also no process for testing whether the conversations turn into action besides continuing the meetings.

“The best kind of supervision is self-supervision,” Weinberg said.

After the workshop, Pirro had already started compiling a list of about 10 ideas that he wants to bring to his school. Next time, he plans to have something he can report back.

hot off the presses

A silver medal for Detroit pre-K. Now where are the kids?

PHOTO: Getty Images

Detroit has earned a silver rating, the second-highest possible, in a national ranking of urban preschool programs published Wednesday. But the report by the advocacy group CityHealth also says that too few eligible 4-year-olds are enrolled.

CityHealth, a foundation-funded organization that rates America’s largest urban centers based on their public policies, looked at how big cities stack up in offering preschool programs in a report published Wednesday.

Researchers at the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University conducted the study and compiled the report.

Following standards set by the largest state-funded pre-K organization, the Great Start Readiness Program, Detroit requires teachers in state preschool to have at least a bachelor’s degree, limits class sizes, and requires health screenings of children.

Those are some of the hallmarks of a high-quality program, according to CityHealth.

Only eight of the 40 cities whose policies were reviewed earned a silver rating, and only five earned the top gold rating. A handful of cities — Indianapolis and Phoenix, Arizona, among them — were far behind, with low enrollment and few or none of CityHealth’s model policies in place.

Still, the gap in Detroit’s pre-K system is a big one. The city has far fewer pre-K seats than it reportedly needs. That’s the case in many of America’s largest cities, according to CityHealth. In nearly half of the cities studied, pre-K programs reached less than one-third of the cities’ pre-schoolers.

The lack of preschool slots is one reason advocates from Michigan’s largest cities are pushing lawmakers to put early childhood on the agenda in Lansing. And it’s part of why Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan has gotten behind the idea of a expanded pre-K system for Detroit.

Read the full report here:

School Funding 101

Report: Michigan has biggest school funding decline in nation

How’s this for a grim school funding statistic: A new report out Wednesday says total revenue for Michigan schools declined 30 percent from 2002 to 2015 — the largest decline for any state over the past quarter century.

The statistic, adjusted for inflation, is among findings of a report by researchers at Michigan State University that reviews school funding and recommends how the state can improve.

“Michigan has tried to improve schools on the cheap, focusing on more accountability and school choice,” wrote David Arsen, lead author and professor of education policy. “To make those policies effective, they have to be matched with adequate funding. We have been kidding ourselves to think we can move forward while cutting funding for schools.”

Co-authors are Tanner Delpier and Jesse Nagel, MSU doctoral students.

Here are a few of the highlights in the report — which is aimed at spurring public discussion of how to improve school funding in the state. The data were adjusted for inflation:

  • Dead last: Where Michigan ranks in total education revenue growth since the mid-90s, when the state’s current school funding formula was developed.
  • 60 percent: How much funding for at-risk students has declined since 2001.
  • 22 percent: How much per-pupil revenue declined from 2002 to 2015.

 The report comes about a year after the bipartisan School Finance Research Collaborative released a comprehensive set of recommendations for fixing the school funding system in Michigan. The MSU report provides a review of that report and adopts many of its recommendations.

It also comes after a December lame-duck legislative session in Michigan that ended with lawmakers voting to shift some funding from the state School Aid Fund to other priorities, such as road repairs and environmental cleanups.

Officials from the Tri-County Alliance for Public Education, a group that represents educators in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, said the MSU report should be a wake-up call for lawmakers. They said it confirms that Michigan’s K-12 funding is in crisis.

“Lawmakers need to stop hiding behind talking points that claim they are investing in our schools when the reality is our funding hasn’t even kept up with the rate of inflation, let alone the increased cost of the services we are being asked to provide our students,” said George Heitsch, president of the alliance and superintendent of Farmington Public Schools. “When you see the numbers from this report showing the drastic funding cuts that have been forced on our schools in recent years, it should be no wonder why our state ranks at the bottom in reading and math proficiency. This simply has to change because our students deserve better.”

Read the full report for more information and recommendations: