A dozen New York City schools have joined a pilot admissions initiative to promote student diversity, according to information released Thursday by the Department of Education.

For the first time, the “Diversity in Admissions” program includes middle and high schools, with a total of 19 schools now participating.

“I believe that increasing school diversity means improving our students’ education, and I am personally committed to this work,” schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said in a statement.

After an initial pilot at seven schools in Manhattan and Brooklyn, the city gave all schools the opportunity to apply for the program starting in spring 2016. Under the program, schools set aside a percentage of seats for students who are poor, are English learners or meet other criteria, such as having an incarcerated parent.

The new admissions policies will be in place for students applying to schools for the 2017-2018 school year.

Matt Gonzales, who focuses on school diversity issues for the social justice nonprofit New York Appleseed, applauded the expansion of the program. But he also said the wide array of targets — from 10 percent of seats set aside at one school to more than 60 percent at others — highlights the need for the DOE to create citywide policies for integration.

“There are limitations to not having having clear accountability standards,” he said.

The education department also announced that three new schools have been approved for PROSE diversity mini-grants. The PROSE program was negotiated with the United Federation of Teachers to give schools flexibility to pursue changes in admissions criteria and teacher evaluations, among other policies.

Here are the new schools that have joined the program:

* East Village Community School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch or are learning English will have priority for 50 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* P.S. 361 The Children’s Workshop School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch or are learning English will have priority for 50 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* P.S. 3 Charrette School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for pre-K and kindergarten seats after all zoned students are admitted.

* P.S. 527 East Side School for Social Action, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for pre-K and kindergarten seats after all zoned students are admitted.

* P.S. 77 New American Academy, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of pre-K and kindergarten seats.

* Brooklyn School of Inquiry: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of Gifted and Talented seats.

* East Side Community School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 62 percent of seats.

* East Side Middle School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 10 percent of seats.

* M.S. 447 The Math and Science Exploratory School, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 30 percent of seats. The school will also change its admissions process to accept more academically diverse students.

* M.S. 839, Brooklyn: Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch will have priority for 40 percent of seats.

* Harvest Collegiate High School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free lunch will have priority for 64 percent of seats.

* Central Park East High School, Manhattan: Students who qualify for free lunch will have priority for 64 percent of seats.