SEX IN THE CITY

Let’s talk about sex (education): NYC high school students weigh in on what they’re not learning in school

PHOTO: David Moriya for the NYCLU
Marlon Rajan, a New York City high school student who administered surveys with the NYCLU about sex education, speaks at an event.

New York City students say the sex education they get in school is often too little, too late — and, in many cases, doesn’t touch on issues affecting those who are gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender. That’s according to two surveys released Tuesday by the New York Civil Liberties Union’s Teen Activist Project and Youth Organizing Institute.

“So many people claim to support LGBTQ rights, but we feel excluded from the curriculum in our own schools,” Marlon Rajan, 16, a student activist who helped with the surveys, said in a statement. “Many of the LGBTQ students at my school don’t know what resources are available to them or who to talk to if they have a problem.”

Each survey included responses from about 300 students from dozens of different high schools.

Half of the students who responded said they learned about sex from their friends, and 11 percent said they had not received information or had no one to ask about sex. More than 80 percent had learned about contraception and sexually transmitted infections in school, but only half said they were taught they have a “right to access confidential health care without involving a parent,” according to the NYCLU.

The survey also found that a majority of students — 88 percent — were not aware their school is required to have someone on staff trained to handle issues of bullying. State law called the Dignity for All Students Act, or DASA, requires all schools to have a coordinator trained to respond to harassment based on race, disability, sexual orientation and more. But only 19 percent of students surveyed knew who their DASA coordinator was — and many schools themselves didn’t know, either, according to the NYCLU.

“One coordinator did not know that they were assigned the role,” the report states.

The NYCLU recommends increased training, informing students about their right to confidential health care and incorporating LGBTQ issues into sex education.

The city Department of Education is making some headway in this realm, recently hiring a “gender equity coordinator.” It also hired its first LGBTQ liaison last year, a position created with funding from the City Council. In response to questioning by Councilman Daniel Dromm at an education committee budget hearing Tuesday, schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña said she would consider building ongoing funding for the position into the Department of Education budget.

“Certainly, the success we’ve seen this year … we really want to see that progress go forward,” she said.

The Department also recently expanded its guidelines for how to serve transgender students, in response to a federal rollback of protections.

A proposal to fund training for educators on including LGBTQ issues in the classroom was originally included on Wednesday’s agenda for the Panel for Educational Policy, a citywide body. But it was pulled after “the original proposed vendor didn’t work out,” according to a Department of Education spokesman. A new vendor is expected, he added.

“We’re dedicated to providing every student, regardless of gender or sexual orientation, with a high-quality education in a safe, supportive and inclusive learning environment,” Toya Holness, a Department of Education spokeswoman, wrote in an email. “As part of this commitment, we require comprehensive health education, which includes topics on sexual health in middle and high school.”

tie breaker

Sheridan school board discussion heats up as date is set for final vote on new superintendent

Sheridan board member Juanita Camacho was sworn in on April 10, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Sheridan School District)

With a new board member who can cast a tie-breaking vote, the school board of the tiny Sheridan district is set to pick its first new superintendent in 10 years.

Finding a replacement for Michael Clough has been a contentious process, with community members pushing for an outside candidate who might be more responsive to their concerns and bring faster change and with veteran board members favoring a candidate who already works in the district.

At a meeting two weeks ago, Clough shouted at the community and the president of the teachers union. The president, who is also a district teacher, had been standing with community members who rose to express support for the outside candidate, a Denver Public Schools administrator named Antonio Esquibel. Clough and the board president called the display “totally disrespectful.”

On Tuesday, the meeting started in a small room where a staff member stood at the door and turned away members of the public, including a reporter who went in anyway. But there was still shouting, this time between board members frustrated with the process and each other.

One issue in dispute: the role of the newly seated board member.

The Sheridan board is divided between two veteran board members, Bernadette Saleh and Sally Daigle, who want to see the district continue on the path Clough set, and two new members, Daniel Stange and Karla Najera, who are allied with the parents and advocates who want to see a new direction.

The fifth seat had been vacant for more than 10 years before Juanita Camacho put in her application earlier this year. Initially board members wanted to wait to seat her until after they chose a new superintendent, but when it seemed like they were headed for deadlock, she was sworn in.

Tuesday, Saleh, the board’s president, argued that Camacho was not seated to help select a new superintendent, while Stange argued that it did appear that way.

Camacho said she did not think about the superintendent search when she initially applied, and she almost considered backing out of the role when she knew she would be a tie-breaker.

“I’m going to make that deciding vote,” Camacho said. “It’s not going to be an easy thing for me.”

Camacho will have one more week to review the qualifications of the three finalists for the position before the board vote at 5 p.m. on May 1.

Part of the division in the community and on the board centers on the perception of the district’s progress. Many community members and teachers say they want drastic changes to improve the district, while others have said they want to continue the district’s current momentum.

Sheridan, a district serving about 1,400 students just southwest of Denver, has improved enough on state ratings to get off the state’s watchlist for chronic low-performance and avoid state sanctions. But by many measures, including graduation rates, the district is still considered low performing.

“You don’t know what we’ve been through,” Daigle told Stange, who she accused of bad-mouthing the district. “We came out of the turnaround long before we were ever expected to.”

Several teachers and parents have spoken to the board during public comment at multiple meetings, asking them to “listen to the community.” Most of them support Esquibel, the only one of three finalists who is from outside the district.

Saleh and Daigle also argued that if other board members wanted a candidate who was from outside the district, they should have voiced that opinion before they collectively narrowed the candidates to the three finalists announced in March.

While many community members and board member Stange prefer Esquibel, they have said that the other two candidates aren’t bad choices to lead the district, and none of the board members disputed that they agreed on the three as finalists.

Future of Schools

What time does school start? Some IPS parents concerned about coming schedule changes

PHOTO: RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post

Dozens of parents filled the Indianapolis Public Schools board room Tuesday afternoon for a last-minute meeting about changing school start times, a sign of how disruptive many believe the changes could be.

Next year, the district is rolling out a new all-choice high school model, where students choose schools by focus area rather than neighborhood. In order to bus students from around the district to those schools without swelling costs, the administration is shifting start and end times for elementary, middle, and high school campuses.

Ultimately, the district says the new schedule will make it more likely that buses will arrive on time.

“With the all choice high school model, there has to be some modification,” Superintendent Lewis Ferebee said ahead of the meeting.

The administration’s recommendation, which was developed after feedback from parents, aims to limit the number of schools with significant changes in start and end times. For about 80 percent of schools, bell times will not change by more than 10 minutes, according to the administration. Under the latest proposal, most middle and high schools will run from 7:20 a.m. to 2:10 p.m. Most elementary schools will run from 9:20 a.m. to 3:55 p.m. The board will vote Thursday on new school start and end times.

The process for developing the plan inspired significant criticism from parents at the transportation meeting.

Dustin Jones, who has two children at the Butler Lab School, said he was particularly concerned that the district was still deciding on the new schedule in April after many parents already made school choices for next year.

“The appearance is the all choice model was ideologically kind of the direction to go, and then that the transportation to support that decision is lagging behind,” Jones said. “That shows a lack of ability and foresight.”

For months, the district has been holding meetings and asking parents for input on the schedule for next year. The administration, however, has struggled to develop a plan that would balance myriad challenges, such as containing costs, limiting disruptions for families, and handling a shortage of bus drivers that is posing significant challenges.

“There’s been an ongoing discussion of the transportation dilemma and challenge,” said board member Mary Ann Sullivan at the board meeting after the discussion. “I think this reflects a very good resolution to most of the concerns. It does not address every concern of every family or every commissioner.”

Initially, leaders were also considering flipping school start times so high schoolers could start at a later time because research shows adolescents benefit from sleeping later. But in the face of practical concerns, such as high school student work schedules, the board abandoned that goal.

That was a disappointment for Molly McPheron, a pediatrician and parent in the district.

“The evidence is really clear that when high schools start later, children have improved health outcomes as well as improved graduation rates, better grades,” McPheron said. “We are going through a lot to make sure high schoolers have choice, have all these options. And then there’s kind of this simple thing that we could do that could potentially substantially improve their lives.”