extra time

Expect delays: New York will release statewide test scores later this year

PHOTO: Ann Schimke

Are more students across New York state able to read and do math on grade level? This year, it will take a little longer to find out.

The state doesn’t expect to release scores for this year’s reading and math tests until mid-September, officials announced Tuesday. That’s at least a month later than usual: In recent years, the scores have come out between late July and mid-August.

The delay is caused by the state’s switch from three-day tests to ones that take just two days. The move requires officials to take extra time to figure out how many questions students must answer correctly in order to earn a passing score — a process that must happen every time tests are retooled.

But teachers and schools will not have test data any later than normal, officials said. The raw data which lets teachers know how their students did   will still be released in June, and schools will receive information about how many students passed the test in August.

The lag time between when schools receive information and the public release allows state officials to double check the data and make sure it is correct, officials said.

“The only thing that you have to think about the shift is when we can report out statewide,” said Angélica Infante-Green, a deputy commissioner who oversees instruction (and who has made the news this week because she’s up for the top education job in Massachusetts). “That is the only thing that is different.”

Keeping students safe

Leadership instability atop Chicago schools contributed to mishandling of student sex cases: report

PHOTO: Getty Images

Instability in leadership at Chicago schools — from a revolving door of chief executives to changes in network chiefs — contributed to a gap in oversight that failed to protect student victims of sexual abuse, according to a preliminary report released today.  

“This turnover makes it difficult to instill and maintain productive policies and procedures, stable systems independent of any person, and cultures of compliance,” according to the draft of a report authored by former federal prosecutor Maggie Hickey, who has been hired by Chicago Public Schools to review the district’s handling of sexual misconduct in schools and make policy recommendations.

The report identified “systemic deficiencies…at all levels: in the schools, the networks, the Central Office, and the Chicago Board of Education (Board),” the report reads. “CPS did not collect overall data to see trends in certain schools or across geographies or demographics. Thus, CPS failed to recognize the extent of the problem.”

“While there were policies and procedures about sexual misconduct on the books, employees were not consistently trained on them, and there were no mechanisms to ensure that they were being uniformly implemented or to evaluate their effectiveness.”

A systemic failure to properly address student sexual abuse across the last decade was first revealed in the Chicago Tribune earlier in the summer. In response, the district implemented several measures including conducting new background checks for school staff, removing the principals of two schools, and creating a new Title IX office.

Board of Education President Frank Clark said in a statement that “student safety is the highest priority for the Board, which is why we took immediate action before this preliminary report was completed. We will use this report as a roadmap to build upon the significant steps the district has taken to strengthen safeguards and supports for our students.”

Find the current draft of the report below.

test scores

How did your school perform on TNReady tests? Search here for results

Student's group

Nearly 700 schools – more than 40 percent of schools in Tennessee – improved in student performance across most grades and subjects, according to a state release of 2018 test results. And 88 school districts or 60 percent met or surpassed student growth expectations.

Test score data for every public school in Tennessee was released Thursday by the state Department of Education.

You can search our database below to find out how students in your school performed. The results show the percentage of students in each school who are performing at or above grade level.

Note: The state doesn’t release data for an exam if fewer than 5 percent of students scored on grade level or if 95 percent of students were above grade level. An asterisk signifies that a school’s score falls in one of those two categories.