progress report

Report: Tennessee’s 3-year-old academic intervention program needs work

PHOTO: Tennessee Department of Education

Three years ago, the Tennessee Department of Education rolled out a program meant to keep struggling students from falling through the cracks. According to a report released Tuesday, its impact on student growth has varied considerably from school to school.

Called Response to Instruction and Intervention, or RTI2, the program has decades of research touting its ability to raise student achievement — but only if it’s implemented correctly.

The state analyzed schools with positive results to see what they’re doing right. Among the report’s takeaways is that schools often have to make “major sacrifices,” like cutting classroom teacher positions for RTI specialists, in order to see growth through the intervention model.

The statewide rollout of the program began in 2014-15 in elementary schools and expanded to all schools this year. Though the program is mandated by the state, schools didn’t receive extra funds to implement it. Many struggled with the logistics or to afford or find qualified staff able to lead the required daily intervention periods.

RTI is used across the nation to identify students’ academic needs early so they can be quickly addressed. Students regularly take quick tests to measure specific skills, like counting out loud, or recognizing numbers. Those who struggle to complete the tasks are supposed to be provided with interventions at increasing levels of intensity, depending on their needs, in addition to receiving grade-level instruction.

“Each student is unique, and the RTI2 framework was designed to support every student at their specific level and area of need,” Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said in a press release. “We want to learn from schools that are seeing promising growth and share their strategies with educators across our state.”

The department analyzed practices at schools that successfully moved third-grade students from non-proficient on state tests to proficient, and identified four keys that set those schools apart:

  • Using multiple data sources and keeping constant communication among staff members about RTI;
  • Building strong RTI teams with staff members able to specialize in intervention;
  • Using all available resources to create staggered, grade-level intervention periods; and
  • Having strong leaders who encourage collective responsibility and engagement.

The department will continue to evaluate how RTI is working across Tennessee, in addition to providing in-person trainings to educators. The complete report is available here.

Timely Decision

Detroit school board approves 2018-19 academic calendar after union agrees to changes

PHOTO: Hero Images
Ivy Bailey, president of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said teachers agreed to calendar changes to do what's best for students.

The Detroit school board approved this year’s academic calendar Tuesday night, hours after Detroit’s main district and its largest teachers union settled a contract disagreement.

The calendar approval, which comes just three weeks before the first day of school, includes some changes to the original calendar spelled out in the teachers’ contract.  The new calendar was approved last week by a school board subcommittee without comment from the the Detroit Federation of Teachers, and it was on the agenda for tonight’s meeting of the full school board.

After discussion with the district, the union signed an agreement on the changes, known as a memorandum of understanding.

The calendar eliminates one-hour-early releases on Wednesdays and moves the teacher training that occurred during that time mostly to the beginning of the school year. It also will move spring break to April 1-5, 2019 — a few weeks earlier than the April 19-26 break specified in the contract.

Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said the situation was not ideal, and he realizes that some teachers may already have made plans for the week of April 19-26.

“Hopefully, our teachers realize they should be there,” he said. But if vacation plans were already made and can be changed, “that’s good.”

“We will be prepared as much as possible to have substitutes and even district staff, if it’s necessary,” he said.

Ivy Bailey, president of the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said teachers aren’t pleased about the agreement.

“No, we were not happy with the change,” Bailey said.

Addressing a question from board member LaMar Lemmons, Bailey said the calendar changes “did constitute an unfair labor practice” because, among other reasons, teachers lost preparation days with the new calendar.

“We are not happy, but we are here for students,” Bailey said. “We understand this is what’s right for students. We put students first, and we are going to work it out.”

The earlier spring break is designed to avoid the testing window for the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, a college entrance exam commonly known as the PSAT.

Other changes to the calendar include eliminating scheduled parent-teacher conferences on October 31 because of the Halloween celebration.

calendar quandary

Detroit district and union hammer out last-second agreement on school calendar before vote at tonight’s board meeting

A screenshot of the proposed academic calendar that has caused concern among union officials.

Detroit’s main school district and its largest teachers union settled a contract disagreement Tuesday afternoon after tensions arose over the seemingly routine approval of this year’s academic calendar.

The proposed calendar includes some changes to the one spelled out in the teachers’ contract. It was approved last week by a school board subcommittee without comment from the union, and the same calendar was on the agenda for tonight’s meeting of the full school board.

With just three weeks until the first day of school, parents and teachers are relying on the calendar to make travel plans and childcare arrangements.

No details were available about the agreement.

Ken Coleman, a spokesman for the Detroit Federation of Teachers, said the agreement was resolved before the meeting started, but couldn’t provide further details. District spokeswoman Chrystal Wilson said she expected the calendar to go to a vote without opposition from the union.

Coleman said earlier on Tuesday that a vote to approve the calendar could violate the teachers’ contract.

Union leaders were surprised last week when Chalkbeat reported that the board was considering a calendar that was different from the one approved in their contract.

The proposed calendar would eliminate one-hour-early releases on Wednesday and move the teacher training that occurred during that time mostly to the beginning of the school year. It also would move spring break to April 1-5, 2019 — a few weeks earlier than the April 19-26 break specified in the contract.

The earlier spring break is designed to avoid the testing window for the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, a college entrance exam commonly known as the PSAT, according to school board documents.

Union officials have said that they had no major objections to the contents of the calendar, only to the way in which it was approved.

Correction: Aug. 14, 2018 This story has been corrected to show that the union and district have reached an agreement about the academic calendar.  A previous version of the story, under the headline “An 11th-hour disagreement over an academic calendar could be settled at tonight’s school board meeting,” referenced a pending agreement when an agreement had in fact been reached.