Top Teachers

Meet the nine finalists to be Tennessee’s 2017-18 Teacher of the Year

PHOTO: Tennessee Department of Education
Derek Voiles, a seventh-grade English language arts teacher in Hamblen County, was Tennessee's 2016-17 Teacher of the Year.

Nine teachers are finalists to be Tennessee’s next Teacher of the Year and to represent the state in national competition.

“These teachers are our students’ heroes,” said Education Commissioner Candice McQueen in releasing the list Tuesday with the State Department of Education.

The 2017-18 winner will be announced this fall, along with regional winners.

In addition to being ambassadors for education, all finalists serve on McQueen’s Teacher Advisory Council, a working group that provides feedback to inform the department’s work.

The finalists are:

West Tennessee

  • Stephanie Rice, Crosswind Elementary, Collierville Schools
  • Mandy Fraley, Northeast Middle, Jackson-Madison County Schools
  • Carol Nanney, McKenzie Elementary, McKenzie Special School District

Middle Tennessee

  • Cicely Woodard, West End Middle, Metro Nashville Public Schools
  • Chelle Daniels, West Middle, Tullahoma City Schools
  • Rebecca Ryan, White County High, White County Schools

East Tennessee

  • Kristin Burrus, Chattanooga School for the Arts and Sciences, Hamilton County Department of Education
  • Karen Latus, Bearden High, Knox County Schools
  • Nancy Miles, South Side Elementary, Johnson City Schools

The competition, which dates to 1960, is based on scoring from a panel of educators from across the state. To qualify, candidates must have been teaching full-time for at least three years, have a track record of exceptional gains in student learning, and be effective school and community leaders.

Last year’s winner was Derek Voiles, a seventh-grade English language arts teacher in Morristown. Voiles teaches at Lincoln Heights Middle in Hamblen County Schools in East Tennessee.

Movers & shakers

Colorado Education Commissioner Katy Anthes joins education advocacy group Chiefs for Change

Katy Anthes (photo by Nicholas Garcia).

Colorado Education Commissioner Katy Anthes has joined Chiefs for Change, a group of state- and district-level school chiefs advocating for reforms they believe will boost achievement for all students, the group announced Wednesday.

“I’m excited to continue working with fellow state and district Chiefs from around the country,” Anthes said in a statement. “Chiefs for Change members are courageous, effective, and laser-focused on students. It is a privilege to join their ranks and come together as a community to advocate for excellence and equity for all of our students.”

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush launched the organization in 2008 to promote his education agenda nationally, and it broke away from Bush’s Foundation for Educational Excellence in 2015 to become an independent nonprofit.

It has championed charter schools, the Common Core State Standards and other reforms. Over the last two years, Chiefs for Change has produced position papers on building a more diverse teacher workforce, expanding instructional choices, and school improvement strategies in the era of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the federal education law.

The group began as a coalition of state education leaders, then expanded its scope to include heads of school districts. Among its two-dozen members are Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg and Antwan Wilson, a former DPS hand who now leads the Washington, D.C., school district. Both men sit on the board of directors.

According to its most recent tax forms, Chiefs for Changes’ largest funders are Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Walton Family Foundation. The Walton Family Foundation also provides funding to Chalkbeat.

Training teachers

More literacy coaches to bolster Tennessee’s drive to boost student reading

PHOTO: Alan Petersime

More than half of its school districts signed on last year when Tennessee created a network of literacy coaches to help classroom teachers improve their students’ reading.

Now entering the program’s second year, another 16 districts are joining up. That means two-thirds of Tennessee districts will have instructional supports in place aimed at addressing the state’s lackluster reading levels.

Tennessee has a reading problem. Less than half of its students in grades 3-8 were considered proficient in 2015, the last year for which test scores are available. In Memphis, the numbers are even more stunning. Less than a third of Shelby County Schools’ third-graders are reading on grade level.

PHOTO: Marta W. Aldrich
Gov. Bill Haslam speaks during the statewide launch of Read to be Ready in 2016.

The state wants to get 75 percent of third-graders proficient by 2025. (New scores coming out this fall will help track progress.)

The coaching network is a major component of Tennessee’s Read to be Ready drive, launched in 2016 by Gov. Bill Haslam and Education Commissioner Candice McQueen. The focus is helping teachers improve literacy instruction for the state’s youngest students.

So far, some 200 coaches have worked directly with more than 3,000 teachers in 83 districts, including all four urban districts. This fall, 99 out of the state’s 146 school systems will participate.

About 92 percent of classroom teachers report that coaching is improving their teaching, even as many coaches say they are stretched too thin, according to a state report released Wednesday. Inadequate planning time for teachers is another barrier to success, the report notes.

To join the coaching network, districts must commit to funding a reading coach who will support about 15 teachers. New districts signing up this year are:

  • Scott County Schools
  • Smith County School System
  • Pickett County Schools
  • Jackson County Schools
  • Macon County Schools
  • Clay County Schools
  • Sumner County Schools
  • Dyer County Schools
  • Wayne County Schools
  • Bedford County Schools
  • Benton County Schools
  • Alamo City School
  • Polk County Schools
  • Kingsport City Schools
  • Oak Ridge Schools
  • Dayton City School

A complete list of participating districts can be found here.