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Tell us: How is your school handling information (and misinformation) about coronavirus?

An Alhambra Unified School District crossing guard stops traffic for parents picking up their children from Ramona Elementary School on Feb. 4, 2020, in Alhambra, California. As the novel coronavirus outbreak spreads, fueling rumors and misinformation, an online petition to cancel classes in the  district had garnered more than 14,000 signatures. The petition on Change.org urges Alhambra Unified, east of Los Angeles and with a heavily Asian population, to shut down until the outbreak is over. Sc
An Alhambra Unified School District crossing guard stops traffic for parents picking up their children from Ramona Elementary School on Feb. 4, 2020, in Alhambra, California. As the novel coronavirus outbreak spreads, fueling rumors and misinformation, an online petition to cancel classes in the district had garnered more than 14,000 signatures. The petition on Change.org urges Alhambra Unified, east of Los Angeles and with a heavily Asian population, to shut down until the outbreak is over. School district officials, however, have dismissed the petition as a bid to whip up hysteria.
Frederic J. Brown, AFP/Getty Images

School districts around the country are ramping up guidance for parents and students on the coronavirus outbreak, while educators are also combating misinformation and bullying targeted at Asian students.

At Chalkbeat, we want to know how districts are preparing in case the outbreak spreads closer to home and how schools are handling racism and bullying related to coronavirus.

As of Friday afternoon, the U.S. had recorded at least 250 cases of the novel coronavirus confirmed by lab tests and 14 deaths, according to a New York Times database. The Centers for Disease Control and other health authorities have urged school districts to prepare for the disease to spread.

The COVID-19 outbreak is changing our daily reality

Chalkbeat is a nonprofit newsroom dedicated to providing the information families and educators need, but this kind of work isn't possible without your help.