clearing a hurdle

These 20 schools just won approval from the Denver school board

Students and staffers at Rocky Mountain Prep's first charter school in Denver cheer in 2012. (Photo by The Denver Post)

The Denver school board Thursday unanimously approved 11 new elementary charter schools, all of which are part of charter networks that already have a presence in the city.

The board also approved new elementaries that would be managed by the school district and three charter high schools, one of which targets teenagers in addiction recovery.

In winning board approval, the schools cleared a necessary hurdle to open in the state’s largest district. But that doesn’t mean all will open, or open right away. Some are seeking placement in a Denver Public Schools building, while others are planning to find their own real estate.

DPS every year solicits new schools to join its nationally recognized “portfolio” of district-run, innovation, charter and magnet schools. Because of slowing enrollment growth, the district didn’t solicit any new standalone schools this year. Such schools were still welcome to apply — and many did. But the only new schools sought by the district were replacements for existing schools scheduled to be closed due to chronic poor performance.

Three of the elementary schools approved Thursday are competing to serve as a replacement for low-performing Amesse Elementary, which is slated to close next year.

However, only two of the schools will move forward to the next stage of the competition: consideration by a review board that will recommend which school the DPS board should pick when it makes its final decision next month. District staff found the plan for teaching English language learners submitted by the other school, University Prep, fell short of requirements.

Two other elementary schools applied to replace Greenlee Elementary, also scheduled to close.

But the board on Thursday rejected the application of one of them, a Wyoming-based charter school called PODER Academy whose founder complained his school wasn’t given a fair shot because of “prior controversy.” As such, only one school will move forward to the review board.

DPS board members also denied a charter to SLAM Colorado, a proposed school based on a Miami charter that focuses on sports and was founded by rapper Pitbull.

Several board members noted that both DPS staff and an independent committee of community members that reviewed the charter application found that the proposals submitted by PODER and SLAM did not meet the district’s quality standards.

Superintendent Tom Boasberg said he’s encouraged “to see such a strong mix of schools, both district-run and charter,” get approved. He said the large number of new elementary schools speaks to “a real focus on the district-level and the charter side on really trying to strengthen our elementary schools” after years of focusing more on improving secondary schools.

Below, read the applications of all the new schools approved Thursday:

The Center for Talent Development at Greenlee, a district-run elementary school proposed by the current Greenlee principal as a replacement for the program that will shutter next year.

The Montbello Children’s Network, a district-run elementary school proposed by the principal of nearby McGlone Academy as a replacement for Amesse.

Denver Elementary Community School 1, 2, 3 and 4, four district-run elementary schools proposed by DPS central-office staff members that could serve as replacements for low-performing schools slated for closure in the future.

KIPP Sunshine Peak Elementary, a charter elementary school that would serve southwest Denver and add to the roster of KIPP schools already operating in Denver.

Rocky Mountain Prep 4, 5 and 6, three more schools in the elementary-focused charter network, which currently operates two schools in Denver and one in Aurora.

STRIVE Prep Elementary 4, 5 and 6, three more elementary schools in the local charter network, which currently operates 11 schools serving kindergarten through 12th grade.

A previously approved STRIVE Prep Elementary is competing to replace Amesse.

University Prep 3, 4, 5 and 6, four more schools in the elementary-focused charter network, which currently operates two schools in Denver. University Prep 3 is also competing to replace Amesse but its application will not move forward in the process because it did not meet the requirements of a program to teach English language learners.

5280 High School, a charter high school focused on project-based learning that would also offer a program for students in recovery from addiction, eating disorders and other challenges.

The CUBE, a personalized learning charter high school aiming to open in northeast Denver.

Colorado High School Charter GES, another location of a charter alternative high school.

Correction: A previous version of this story stated that two other schools, Cooperative Community Schools and an expansion of Academy 360, also won approval. The board did not vote on those schools Thursday.

Finding a home

Denver school board permanently co-locates charter elementary in middle school building

Students and staffers at Rocky Mountain Prep's first charter school in Denver cheer in 2012. (Photo by The Denver Post)

A Denver elementary charter school that was temporarily granted space in a shuttering district-run middle school building will now be housed there permanently.

The school board voted Thursday to permanently place Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest charter school in the Kepner Middle School building, where it is sharing space this year with three other school programs. Such co-locations can be controversial but have become more common in a district with skyrocketing real estate prices and ambitious school quality goals.

Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest is part of a homegrown charter network that has shown promising academic results. The network also has a school in Aurora and is expected to open a third Denver school next year in the northwest part of the city.

Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest was first placed at Kepner for the 2015-16 school year. The placement was supposed to be temporary. The district had decided the year before to phase out low-performing Kepner and replace it a new district-run middle school, Kepner Beacon, and a new charter middle school, STRIVE Prep Kepner, which is part of a larger network. The district also temporarily placed a third charter school there: Compass Academy.

Compass has since moved out of Kepner but the other four schools remain: Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest, Kepner Beacon, STRIVE Prep Kepner and the Kepner Legacy Middle School, which is on track to be completely phased out and closed by June 2019.

In a written recommendation to the school board, district officials acknowledged that permanently placing Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest at Kepner would create a space crunch.

The Kepner campus has the capacity to serve between 1,100 and 1,500 students, the recommendation says. Once all three schools reach full size, officials expect the schools will enroll a total of approximately 1,250 students. Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest currently serves students in preschool through third grade with a plan to add more grades.

“DPS facilities staff are currently working with all three schools to create a long‐term vision for the campus, including facility improvements that ensure all three schools have what they need to continue to excel,” says the recommendation from Chief Operating Officer David Suppes and Director of Operations and Support Services Liz Mendez.

District staff tried to find an alternate location for Rocky Mountain Prep Southwest but were unsuccessful, the recommendation says. The district does not have many available buildings, and competition for them among district-run and charter schools can be fierce. In northeast Denver, seven secondary schools are currently vying for the use of a shuttered elementary.

Future of Schools

Indianapolis needs tech workers. IPS hopes that George Washington will help fill that gap.

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy

Indiana companies are looking for workers with computer expertise, and Indianapolis Public Schools leaders want their students to fill that gap.

Next year, George Washington High School will launch a specialized information technology academy designed to give students the skills to pursue careers in IT — and the exposure to know what jobs even exist.

“Half of what kids aspire to be is either someone they know does it or they’ve seen it on TV,” said Karen Jung, president of Nextech, a nonprofit that works to increase computer science preparation in K-12 schools. Nextech is partnering with IPS to develop the new IT program at George Washington.

For teens who don’t know anyone working in computer science, meeting role models is essential, Jung said. When teens see women of color or artists working in computer sciences, they realize there are opportunities for people like them.

“Once we put them in front of and inside of workplaces … it clicks,” Jung said. They believe “they would belong.”

The IT program is one of three academies that will open in George Washington next year as part of a broad plan to close nearly half of the district’s high schools and add specialized focus areas at the four remaining campuses. In addition to the IT academy, George Washington will have programs in: advanced manufacturing, engineering, and logistics; and business and finance.

The district is also moving to a model without neighborhood high schools. Students will be expected to choose high schools based on focus area rather than location. This year, many current high schoolers were required to reapply in an effort to make sure they enroll in academies that fit their interests.

The district will host a showcase of schools to help parents and students with their selections. The showcase runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Indiana State Museum.

Stan Law, principal of Arlington High School now, will take over George Washington next year. (Arlington will close at the end of this year.) He said the new academies offer an opportunity for students to see what they need to master — from soft skills to knowledge — to get good jobs when they graduate.

“I want kids to really make the connection of the purpose of high school,” Law said. “It is that foundation for the rest of your life, in terms of the quality of life that you are going to live.”

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy
Stan Law

When the IT academy launches next year, students who select the program will be able to spend about one to two classes per year focused on information technology, said Ben Carter, who runs career and technical education for IPS.

Carter hopes the academies will reshape George Washington and other IPS campuses by connecting potential careers with the work students do everyday at school. Students who share a focus area will be in a cohort, and they will share many of the same core classes such as English, math and history, said Carter. Teachers, in turn, will be able to relate what students are studying in their history class to projects they are working on in the IT program, for example.

To show students what a career in information technology might look like, students will have the chance to tour, connect with mentors and intern at local companies.

“If I’m in one of these career classes — I’m in software development, but then I get to go to Salesforce and walk through and see the environment, to me as a student, that’s inspiring,” said Carter. “It’s like, ‘oh, this is what I can have.’ ”

He added. “It increases engagement but also gives them a true sense of what the career is.”