in response

Eva Moskowitz calls ‘Got to Go’ list an anomaly as Success principal gives tearful apology

Following a report detailing Success Academy schools trying to remove unruly students, school founder Eva Moskowitz denied any systematic effort to push students out of her schools, took responsibility for the oversight of her school leaders, and elicited a tearful apology from the principal who created the list.

In a lengthy press conference, Moskowitz focused on the “Got to Go” list described in the New York Times and said she is not aware of similar lists at other schools. But her statements, and the testimony of a number of Success principals, affirmed that the charter network’s strict discipline policies do not make Success the best fit for every child, particularly those with special needs.

“A mistake was made here and I take personal responsibility as the leader of this organization for that happening under my watch,” Moskowitz said. “We are not perfect. We are a work in progress. This is incredibly humbling and difficult work.”

Success Academy is the largest charter-school network in New York City, serving 11,000 students, and its schools post impressive test results in traditionally hard to serve communities. Critics have long accused the network of posting high test scores by pressuring undisciplined students to leave.

But on Friday, Moskowitz made it clear that she would make no such admission. Instead, she said the “Got to Go” list at the network’s school in Fort Greene, Brooklyn runs counter to Success’ beliefs. Candido Brown, the principal who created the list, she said, was reprimanded immediately and the list only existed for three days, she said.

“What this incident illustrates is that it is not our policy to have ‘Got to Go’ lists or to push out students,” Moskowitz said.

She did not address the other incidents detailed in the New York Times article, including threats to call 911 and repeated meetings designed to wear parents down until they withdrew their students.

Moskowitz defended Brown as a person of “high moral character” and said that firing him would be “profoundly wrong.” But she also provided reporters with email correspondence in which she called Brown “stubborn” and “somewhat dense.”

Brown stood behind Moskowitz as she spoke and then took the podium and delivered an emotional apology.

“As an educator I fell short of my commitment to all children and families at my school and for that I am deeply sorry,” he said, speaking through tears. His actions, he said, were driven by desperation to turnaround a struggling school.

“I was doing what I thought I needed to do to fix a school where I would not send my own child,” he said.

Moskowitz and other Success Academy leaders have frequently compared the schools in their network to district schools, making the case that Success provides superior educational opportunities. At several press conferences and this year, Moskowitz has called on Mayor Bill de Blasio to treat charter schools as equals and provide them with better space and funding.

Yet on Friday, Moskowitz said that “a very small percentage of kids,” particularly those with special needs, might not find the right support at Success and should instead consider a district school.

“Success may not be the absolute best setting for every child,” she said.

on the record

Eva Moskowitz sends letter calling Success board chair’s comments ‘indefensible’ — but also defending his record

PHOTO: Monica Disare
Eva Moskowitz, founder and CEO of Success Academy

In response to widespread criticism of a racial comment made by Success Academy’s chairman, the leader of the charter network, Eva Moskowitz, sent a letter Tuesday to parents, teachers and staff.

In the letter, Moskowitz used strong language to condemn Daniel Loeb’s comments. On Facebook last week, Loeb wrote that Andrea Stewart-Cousins, an African-American state senator whom he called loyal to unions, does “more damage to people of color than anyone who ever donned a hood” — an apparent reference to the Ku Klux Klan. Loeb later apologized and deleted the comment.

In today’s letter, Moskowitz called the comments “indefensible,” “insensitive” and “hurtful,” a more aggressive rebuke than her previous statement.

Yet she also defended Loeb’s track record in the letter, pointing out his commitment to Success and various social causes. A spokeswoman for Success Academy confirmed that Loeb remains the board’s chairman.

The racist violence that ensued this past weekend in Charlottesville put an even more damaging spin on his comments. At a rally Monday to support Stewart-Cousins, the Senate’s minority leader, she made the connection between her situation and the events in Charlottesville.

“That is extremely hurtful given the legacy, certainly, of people of color — my ancestors,” said Stewart-Cousins. “We all got a chance to see it in Charlottesville, what that represents.”

Moskowitz made a veiled reference to the weekend’s events in the letter, saying that engaging students is “all the more important in the face of the broader trauma and crisis we are facing as a country.”

Here is the full text of the letter:

 

polling problems

National support for charter schools has dropped sharply in last year

PHOTO: Glenn Asakaw/Denver Post
A teacher at a KIPP charter school in Denver

Public support for charter schools has declined substantially in the last year, according to a national survey released Tuesday.

The survey, conducted by the school choice-friendly journal Education Next, found that slightly more Americans support charter schools, 39 percent, than oppose them, at 36 percent. But that marks a drop from 51 percent support just last year — one of the biggest changes in public opinion seen in the long-running survey, according to Harvard professor and the magazine’s editor-in-chief Marty West.

“The sharp drop in support for charter schools constitutes the major change in the school-choice battle over the course of the past year,” wrote West and others in an accompanying essay.  

Results from the annual survey, which polls a representative sample of American adults, come as charter schools have faced a number of recent setbacks.

The NAACP and National Education Association both recently codified positions designed to restrict the growth of charter schools. Last year, charter advocates suffered a high-profile defeat at the ballot box in Massachusetts, where voters overwhelmingly rejected a ballot measure to lift the state cap on charter schools.

At the same time, Donald Trump, a charter school backer, was elected president, and his Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has also been a strong supporter of the publicly funded but privately managed schools.

“The opinions about charter schools that matter most are the opinions of parents and students who have chosen charter schools,” said Nina Rees, the president of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, in a statement. “This dip in broad public approval, as reported by Education Next, seems more reflective of the unique moment we’re in.”

But the poll finds little evidence that the fall in charter school support is related to Trump or DeVos.

For one thing, backing for private school choice programs — like vouchers or tax credit programs — generally held steady, even though the Trump administration has also praised that approach. Moreover, support for charter schools declined substantially this year among both Democrats and Republicans.

The survey also also informed one group of respondents that Trump supports charter schools and then asked their opinion; another set of people were not told Trump’s position.

Knowing Trump’s views actually led to a net increase in support for charters, with large bumps for Republicans and essentially no effect among Democrats.

It’s unclear, then, what accounts for the drop in support for charter schools. West suggested that increasingly pitched locally debates, like those in Massachusetts and elsewhere, may be part of the explanation.

And while charter school supporters might at least hope that support for charters is higher in states with a lot of them — the idea being that once voters get to know charters, they like them — there is no evidence for that, either.

In an analysis shared with Chalkbeat, West found no correlation between how many students attended a charter in a given state and support for charter schools. That mirrors the election results within Massachusetts, where the ballot initiative to lift the cap on charters lost across the state — even in cities like Boston, where many students attend charter schools.