BLM in EDU

New York City teachers bring Black Lives Matter to the classroom

PHOTO: Christina Veiga
Black Lives Matter at School will rally at the education department on Tuesday. In December, advocates demanded anti-bias training for teachers and culturally relevant education for students.

Students at Sunset Park High School walked out of class recently to protest the removal of a classmate’s artwork that echoes what some at the predominantly black and Hispanic school feel: That police brutality is a problem in communities of color.

In the piece, a black girl wields a spray paint can to turn a racist message into one of hope. “Bigger than hate,” she scrawls over an epithet. But in the background, a white police officer crouches with his gun drawn.

Based off a piece by a pair of professional artists, the poster was part of a week of action for Black Lives Matter at School, a national series of workshops, actions and community conversations centered around the civil rights movement. Hundreds of New York City teachers brought the social movement to their classrooms last week, leading discussions about racial justice and pushing their administrators to adopt culturally sensitive practices.

The events culminate Tuesday with a rally at the education department headquarters.

“This is our modern day civil rights movement, so it’s important we teach it,” said Rosie Frascella, a Brooklyn high school teacher who helped organize events citywide.

But as the Sunset Park protest illustrates, acknowledging racism in the classroom can be treacherous ground for school leaders and teachers. The painting generated controversy after someone posted a photo of it on Facebook, along with the school’s number and an invitation to call in protest. A teacher there said it is no longer on display, despite reports that it was relocated elsewhere in the building.

The week of action comes amid a grassroots movement to integrate New York City schools, which are among the most segregated in the nation. Some activists and educators say that movement cannot succeed unless teachers are trained in having tough, honest conversations with students, and have reflected on these issues themselves.

A spate of racially charged incidents in city schools highlights the consequences when that doesn’t happen in a system where 70 percent of students are black or Hispanic, and a majority of teachers are white.

In the past few weeks, the New York Daily News has reported on a Bronx teacher who stepped on the backs of black children during a lesson about slavery; a white principal who was accused of forbidding lessons on the Harlem Renaissance; and a Brooklyn elementary school PTA president who advertised a fundraiser with pictures featuring performers in blackface.

“All of this is just further evidence of a systemic problem in New York City,” said Natasha Capers, a coordinator for the parent-led group Coalition for Educational Justice. “Systemic problems call for systemic solutions.”

In another show of how difficult the work can be, the United Federation of Teachers recently declined to endorse Black Lives Matter week of action. Organizers say it is the only union do so, out of 10 cities where resolutions were proposed.

An education department spokesman said the city has built racial equity into its principal training programs and has provided a new social studies curriculum that includes “multiple perspectives and voices.” The city has also led anti-bias training for 450 teachers — out of more than 70,000 total — while individual schools and district leaders have done similar work on their own.

“Anti-bias training and culturally responsive teaching are critical to ensuring a welcoming learning environment for all students,” spokesman Will Mantell wrote in an email. “These approaches are integrated throughout New York City schools.”

Frascella, an English teacher at International High School in Prospect Heights, said it’s impossible to ignore the experiences her students bring to the classroom. The network that her school belongs to caters to immigrant students, many of whom have been affected by the rancor surrounding the federal immigration debate.

“They come to us with questions. They’re trying to understand the world they live in,” she said. “We put our students first. We honor their experience and their voices.”

At her school, students threw a party in honor of black lives, hosted a fashion show and raised money for the Black Alliance for Just Immigration. Frascella said Black Lives Matter helps teachers navigate the complexities through resources like lesson plans. In New York City, teachers held a curriculum fair and acted out demo lessons.

“What we’ve been trying to do is creating spaces for teachers to have those conversations so they feel more confident in their teaching and supported,” she said.

Day without a Teacher

These Colorado school districts are canceling classes for teacher protests

Empty Chairs And Desks In Classroom (Getty Images)

Thousands of Colorado teachers are expected to descend on the state Capitol Thursday and Friday to call on lawmakers to make a long-term commitment to increasing K-12 education funding.

These Colorado districts have announced they’re canceling classes because they won’t have enough teachers and other staff on hand to safely have students in their buildings. They include eight of the state’s 10 largest districts, serving more than 400,000 students.

Some charter schools, including DSST and STRIVE Prep, are joining the teacher demonstrations, and others are not. Parents whose children attend charter schools in these districts should check with the school.

Unless otherwise noted, classes are canceled for the entire day on Friday, April 27.

  • Jeffco Public Schools, serving 86,100 students (classes canceled Thursday, April 26)
  • Denver Public Schools, serving 92,600 students (early dismissal scheduled for Friday, April 27)
  • Douglas County School District, serving 67,500 students
  • Cherry Creek School District, serving 55,600 students
  • Adams 12 Five Star Schools, serving 38,900 students
  • St. Vrain Valley School District, serving 32,400 students
  • Poudre School District, serving 30,000 students
  • Colorado Springs School District 11, serving 27,400 students
  • Thompson School District, serving 16,200 students

Teachers who miss work to engage in political activity generally have to take a personal day to do so.

This list will be updated as we hear from more districts.

Future of Schools

Indiana lawmakers are bringing back a plan to expand takeover for Gary and Muncie schools

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos

It’s official: Lawmakers are planning to re-introduce a controversial plan to expand state takeover of the Gary and Muncie school districts when they come back May 14 for a one-day special session.

Indiana Republican leaders said they believe the plan, which would give control of Muncie schools to Ball State University and strip power from the Gary school board, creates opportunities for both districts to get on the right track after years of poor decision-making around finances.

“Two state entities year after year ignored requests from the legislature to get their fiscal health in order,” said Senate President David Long. “We understand there’s going to be some politics associated with it.”

But Indiana Democrats strongly oppose the takeovers, and House Minority Leader Terry Goodin, a Democrat from Austin, said bringing back the “heinous” takeover plan is too complicated to be dealt with in one day. Democrats had cheered when the bill unceremoniously died last month after lawmakers ran out of time during the regular session and lambasted Republican for calling for an extension to revisit it.

“This is not a thing that can be idly approved without full consideration,” Goodin said. “Because you are talking about the latest step to take the education of our children out of the hands of local school boards and parents and placing it under the control of Big Brother.”

But lawmakers’ push to expand district takeovers come as the state’s education officials are stepping back from taking control of individual schools. In this case, as with last year’s unprecedented bill that took over Gary schools, finances appear to be the driving motivation behind lawmakers’ actions, not academics. Typically, state takeover of schools has come as a consequence for years of failing state letter grades.

Gary schools have struggled for decades to deal with declining enrollment, poor financial management and poor academic performance. Although the Muncie district hasn’t seen the same kind of academic problems, it has been sharply criticized for mishandling a $10 million bond issue.

“All I had to hear is that a $10 million capital bond was used for operating expenses,” House Speaker Brian Bosma said, since those funds are intended to make improvements to buildings. “Fiscal irresponsibility is paramount, but also fiscal irresponsibility translates to educational irresponsibility as well.”

Bosma said that Ball State and Gary officials were on board with resurrecting House Bill 1315. Another part of the bill would develop an early warning system to identify districts in financial trouble.

The provisions in the bill would only apply to public school districts, but other types of schools, including online charter schools and private schools accepting taxpayer-funded vouchers, have had recent financial situations that have raised serious questions and even led to closure.

Bosma said those schools have their own fiscal accountability systems in place, but recent attempts to close gaps in state charter law and have private schools with voucher students submit annual reports to the state have gone mostly nowhere.

Both Bosma and Long said their plan to reconsider five bills during the special session, including House Bill 1315, had passed muster withGov. Eric Holcomb. But district takeover was not mentioned in Friday’s statement from Holcomb, nor did he say it was one of the urgent issues lawmakers should take up when he spoke to reporters in mid-March.

Instead, he reiterated his support for getting a $12 million loan from the state’s Common School Fund for Muncie schools and directing $10 million over the next two years to the state’s Secured School Fund. The money would allow districts to request dollars for new and improved school safety equipment and building improvements.