Future of Schools

One website, no waitlists: Indianapolis rolls out one application for district and charter schools

PHOTO: Dylan Peers McCoy

In the coming weeks, about two dozen Enroll Indy staff members will fan out across Indianapolis, canvassing neighborhoods and setting up shop at community events with an ambitious goal: changing how families choose schools.

Enroll Indy is a nonprofit dedicated to giving parents a single place to learn about and apply for charter and district schools. When its new tool, OneMatch, launches Wednesday, families will be able to apply for more than 50 charter and Indianapolis Public School district schools through the same website or enrollment office.

The system, which is similar to common enrollment approaches being used in urban districts across the country, has lofty aims. It is supposed make school choice easier for families by creating a single application process and deadline. Advocates have suggested that making the application process more transparent could help schools become more diverse and give low-income students a better chance of admission to the city’s most sought-after programs, which have historically had earlier application deadlines.

At the same time, a common application process could make it easier for schools to plan enrollment and for school policymakers to roll out more of the types of schools that are most sought-after, advocates said.

But in the first year of OneMatch, one of the biggest challenges will be simply getting out the word to families that there’s a new way of applying for school, and a new application deadline, instead of the widely varying deadlines that schools have had in the past. There are three admissions rounds, but the group is pushing to get parents to apply by Jan. 15.

“The wonderful thing about all this is we will have constant data,” said Caitlin Hannon, founder of Enroll Indy. “We can look at it by zip codes and say, ‘We’ve got to go canvass in those neighborhoods that we’re not hearing from.’ ”

Parents applying through OneMatch will make a list of their top choice schools in order of preference. Once the application window closes, seats will be awarded by lottery, and students will get a single offer based on their preference and lottery results. Schools will no longer have waitlists. Instead, they will estimate how many admitted students will ultimately enroll.

Patrick Herrel, who heads IPS enrollment, told the school board that the approach helps schools and families plan for the next year.

“This allows us to say, ‘This is your offer. This is the best offer you are going to get. What do you think?’ ” he said.

The approach is becoming increasingly popular in cities where parents choose from many charter and traditional public school options. Denver, New Orleans and Washington, D.C., all use common enrollment websites. Enroll Indy was started with funding from the Mind Trust, which supports charter schools and district-charter partnerships, and common enrollment systems are often supported by advocates who want to bring order to school choice.

It can be politically complicated, however, to entice schools and districts to give up control over their admissions. A similar system in Detroit fell apart because more than three quarters of the city’s schools did not participate. And in Indianapolis there were murmurs of discontent last year when some IPS school board members thought OneMatch was being hastily rolled out. Those concerns dissipated once the launch date was pushed back, and the board voted to join OneMatch, as well as lease space to Enroll Indy in the district headquarters.

Although the system has been criticized by skeptics of school choice, there has not be an organized campaign to block OneMatch. Several charter schools and networks are not participating, but the vast majority of Indianapolis charter schools will use the system for admissions, as well as all of the IPS magnet and innovation schools. Parents will be able to register for neighborhood schools on the website, but they won’t go through the lottery since seats in those schools are guaranteed.

Earl Phalen, who founded Phalen Leadership Academies, said that the network chose not to use the system for its two Indianapolis charter schools because they want applicants to connect with the schools or talk with current families before applying. (The network also runs two IPS innovation schools which will use OneMatch.)

PLA might join OneMatch after it has been running for a few years and the drawbacks and benefits are clearer, said Phalen, but for now, the charter network’s admission process is working.

“We spent so much time figuring out how to build our own process … it doesn’t seem like the right move right away,” he said.

The first year will be something of a test for OneMatch, as school leaders, parents and policymakers watch to see how the system plays out. But ultimately, Hannon hopes that common enrollment will help reshape the school landscape in the city for years to come. When local leaders have more information on what schools are in especially high demand, Hannon said, they can plan schools that fill those gaps.

“Overtime, as people who create schools respond to the demand of families, we should start to have more people getting their first and second choices,” Hannon said.

Day without a Teacher

These Colorado school districts are canceling classes for teacher protests

Empty Chairs And Desks In Classroom (Getty Images)

Thousands of Colorado teachers are expected to descend on the state Capitol Thursday and Friday to call on lawmakers to make a long-term commitment to increasing K-12 education funding.

These Colorado districts have announced they’re canceling classes because they won’t have enough teachers and other staff on hand to safely have students in their buildings. They include eight of the state’s 10 largest districts, serving more than 400,000 students.

Some charter schools, including DSST and STRIVE Prep, are joining the teacher demonstrations, and others are not. Parents whose children attend charter schools in these districts should check with the school.

Unless otherwise noted, classes are canceled for the entire day on Friday, April 27.

  • Jeffco Public Schools, serving 86,100 students (classes canceled Thursday, April 26)
  • Denver Public Schools, serving 92,600 students (early dismissal scheduled for Friday, April 27)
  • Douglas County School District, serving 67,500 students
  • Cherry Creek School District, serving 55,600 students
  • Adams 12 Five Star Schools, serving 38,900 students
  • St. Vrain Valley School District, serving 32,400 students
  • Poudre School District, serving 30,000 students
  • Colorado Springs School District 11, serving 27,400 students
  • Thompson School District, serving 16,200 students

Teachers who miss work to engage in political activity generally have to take a personal day to do so.

This list will be updated as we hear from more districts.

Future of Schools

Indiana lawmakers are bringing back a plan to expand takeover for Gary and Muncie schools

PHOTO: Shaina Cavazos

It’s official: Lawmakers are planning to re-introduce a controversial plan to expand state takeover of the Gary and Muncie school districts when they come back May 14 for a one-day special session.

Indiana Republican leaders said they believe the plan, which would give control of Muncie schools to Ball State University and strip power from the Gary school board, creates opportunities for both districts to get on the right track after years of poor decision-making around finances.

“Two state entities year after year ignored requests from the legislature to get their fiscal health in order,” said Senate President David Long. “We understand there’s going to be some politics associated with it.”

But Indiana Democrats strongly oppose the takeovers, and House Minority Leader Terry Goodin, a Democrat from Austin, said bringing back the “heinous” takeover plan is too complicated to be dealt with in one day. Democrats had cheered when the bill unceremoniously died last month after lawmakers ran out of time during the regular session and lambasted Republican for calling for an extension to revisit it.

“This is not a thing that can be idly approved without full consideration,” Goodin said. “Because you are talking about the latest step to take the education of our children out of the hands of local school boards and parents and placing it under the control of Big Brother.”

But lawmakers’ push to expand district takeovers come as the state’s education officials are stepping back from taking control of individual schools. In this case, as with last year’s unprecedented bill that took over Gary schools, finances appear to be the driving motivation behind lawmakers’ actions, not academics. Typically, state takeover of schools has come as a consequence for years of failing state letter grades.

Gary schools have struggled for decades to deal with declining enrollment, poor financial management and poor academic performance. Although the Muncie district hasn’t seen the same kind of academic problems, it has been sharply criticized for mishandling a $10 million bond issue.

“All I had to hear is that a $10 million capital bond was used for operating expenses,” House Speaker Brian Bosma said, since those funds are intended to make improvements to buildings. “Fiscal irresponsibility is paramount, but also fiscal irresponsibility translates to educational irresponsibility as well.”

Bosma said that Ball State and Gary officials were on board with resurrecting House Bill 1315. Another part of the bill would develop an early warning system to identify districts in financial trouble.

The provisions in the bill would only apply to public school districts, but other types of schools, including online charter schools and private schools accepting taxpayer-funded vouchers, have had recent financial situations that have raised serious questions and even led to closure.

Bosma said those schools have their own fiscal accountability systems in place, but recent attempts to close gaps in state charter law and have private schools with voucher students submit annual reports to the state have gone mostly nowhere.

Both Bosma and Long said their plan to reconsider five bills during the special session, including House Bill 1315, had passed muster withGov. Eric Holcomb. But district takeover was not mentioned in Friday’s statement from Holcomb, nor did he say it was one of the urgent issues lawmakers should take up when he spoke to reporters in mid-March.

Instead, he reiterated his support for getting a $12 million loan from the state’s Common School Fund for Muncie schools and directing $10 million over the next two years to the state’s Secured School Fund. The money would allow districts to request dollars for new and improved school safety equipment and building improvements.