Turnover at the top

Interim Acting Principal Rosemarie Jahoda is out at Townsend Harris

PHOTO: Renaenia Cipriano Pangan

After months of protests by students and faculty, a new principal has been named for Townsend Harris High School: Brian Condon.

Condon is currently principal of the School for Tourism and Hospitality in the Bronx, a high school with a higher-than-average poverty rate that opened in 2012-13 and graduated its first class last year. Townsend Harris High School, located in Queens, is one of the city’s most elite screened schools, with a graduation rate of 100 percent. 

Before becoming principal of Tourism and Hospitality, Condon worked as an English teacher and dean at Martin Van Buren High School in Queens. He will take the helm at Townsend Harris on May 1.

“I am excited to join the Townsend Harris community and meet with students, staff and families,” Condon said in a statement. “While it is bittersweet to be leaving Tourism and Hospitality, this is an exciting new chapter.”

Chalkbeat reported on the crisis at Townsend Harris in December and later profiled student leader Alex Chen, who helped lead the charge against Jahoda. She was accused of creating an uncomfortable atmosphere in the school, allegations that trailed her from her previous placement at Bronx High School of Science.

The principal’s appointment was announced by Superintendent Elaine Lindsey at a school leadership team meeting on Thursday. “Brian Condon is an experienced, talented educator,” Lindsey said in a statement. “I look forward to the work he’ll do at Townsend Harris and thank Rosemarie Jahoda for her leadership as interim acting principal.” 

The news appears to have broken first on the website of the Townsend Harris High School Classic, the school’s student newspaper, which has consistently led news coverage on the battle.

Here’s The Classic’s interview with Condon:

Keeping students safe

Leadership instability atop Chicago schools contributed to mishandling of student sex cases: report

PHOTO: Getty Images

Instability in leadership at Chicago schools — from a revolving door of chief executives to changes in network chiefs — contributed to a gap in oversight that failed to protect student victims of sexual abuse, according to a preliminary report released today.  

“This turnover makes it difficult to instill and maintain productive policies and procedures, stable systems independent of any person, and cultures of compliance,” according to the draft of a report authored by former federal prosecutor Maggie Hickey, who has been hired by Chicago Public Schools to review the district’s handling of sexual misconduct in schools and make policy recommendations.

The report identified “systemic deficiencies…at all levels: in the schools, the networks, the Central Office, and the Chicago Board of Education (Board),” the report reads. “CPS did not collect overall data to see trends in certain schools or across geographies or demographics. Thus, CPS failed to recognize the extent of the problem.”

“While there were policies and procedures about sexual misconduct on the books, employees were not consistently trained on them, and there were no mechanisms to ensure that they were being uniformly implemented or to evaluate their effectiveness.”

A systemic failure to properly address student sexual abuse across the last decade was first revealed in the Chicago Tribune earlier in the summer. In response, the district implemented several measures including conducting new background checks for school staff, removing the principals of two schools, and creating a new Title IX office.

Board of Education President Frank Clark said in a statement that “student safety is the highest priority for the Board, which is why we took immediate action before this preliminary report was completed. We will use this report as a roadmap to build upon the significant steps the district has taken to strengthen safeguards and supports for our students.”

Find the current draft of the report below.

test scores

How did your school perform on TNReady tests? Search here for results

Student's group

Nearly 700 schools – more than 40 percent of schools in Tennessee – improved in student performance across most grades and subjects, according to a state release of 2018 test results. And 88 school districts or 60 percent met or surpassed student growth expectations.

Test score data for every public school in Tennessee was released Thursday by the state Department of Education.

You can search our database below to find out how students in your school performed. The results show the percentage of students in each school who are performing at or above grade level.

Note: The state doesn’t release data for an exam if fewer than 5 percent of students scored on grade level or if 95 percent of students were above grade level. An asterisk signifies that a school’s score falls in one of those two categories.