Lunch woes? Staff shortages? Quarantines? Tell us how Michigan’s school year is going.

This Chalkbeat callout shows children eating lunch at a long table in Detroit.
Most Michigan students are back to learning in-person, a welcome change after a year in virtual school. But COVID remains a major obstacle to education. As we continue to cover this challenging, hopeful year, we’re asking parents to guide us. (Anthony Lanzilote for Chalkbeat)

When Michigan schools reopened this fall, the new semester was hailed as an opportunity for academic and social recovery after a COVID-scrambled school year.

So far, the results have been mixed.

Most students are back to learning in person, a welcome change after a challenging year in virtual school. But COVID remains a major obstacle to education.

Just ask the students in lengthy quarantines, parents concerned about shortages of special education aides and security guards, and families that had to scramble after their child’s school was closed due to a COVID outbreak.

As we continue to cover this challenging, hopeful year, we’re asking parents to guide us.

Please tell us about your concerns and priorities by filling out the survey below. If you have trouble viewing the survey, go here.

The Latest

Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson asked Illinois Senate President Don Harmon in a letter late Thursday to hold a bill that would block changes to selective enrollment schools and prevent any school closures until 2027.

Lawmakers last year relaxed income eligibility rules so that most Indiana families now qualify for the Choice Scholarship program.

Students work with artists to find themselves, learn about their world, and see their work showcased around the city.

El programa capacitará a jóvenes de entre 18 y 24 años para actuar “como navegadores que sirven a estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria en escuelas y en organizaciones comunitarias.”

The teachers union’s 7,000 members are scheduled to take a ratification vote on June 6.

The state superintendent said cuts to staff won’t be prevalent in all districts. But educators say the “fiscal cliff” existed in the state well before federal COVID relief funds.