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Reema Amin

Reporter, Chalkbeat New York

Reema Amin covers New York City public schools. Before Chalkbeat, she covered city and state government for the Daily Press in Virginia’s Hampton Roads region and was a breaking news reporter at the Chicago Sun-Times. Reema received a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a master’s degree in public affairs journalism from Columbia College Chicago.

Chalkbeat created a lookup tool examining changes to Fair Student Funding, a major source of funding for schools.
New York City’s Class of 2022 returned to school full time after two disrupted years. Four graduating high school seniors told us about how they made it through.
Schools will see less money in new budget deal, but Mayor Eric Adams says they’re not cuts. Instead, he sees the funding as reflecting the decreased student population.
Starting June 13, children under 5 will no longer be required to wear masks.
As federal stimulus funding starts to wind down, school leaders are facing tough choices with declining budgets and enrollment.
The first-term mayor will be back in Albany sooner than he had hoped to renew mayoral control and will now also be tasked with shrinking class sizes.
Many organizations will face tough decisions about laying off staff and cutting back services that have been a cornerstone of the city’s much-lauded Community Schools program.
NYC education officials plan to expand transfer high schools to serve those students, using a Bronx school as one model.
A four-year extension of mayoral control of city schools seems out of the picture for Mayor Eric Adams as he makes his pitch to Albany lawmakers.
The first-of-its-kind curriculum was meant to teach student students about urban planning and how to advocate for their neighborhoods.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
City officials warned that the PEP’s failure to approve the funding formula could delay funding to schools.
The Muslim holy month is 10 days earlier next year and could overlap again with state tests, families worry.
The COVID tests should be taken weekly, at least five days apart, according to an education department letter sent to families on Wednesday.
Questions remain about how the city will spend the remainder of billions in federal COVID stimulus funding on New York City’s school system.
Immigration advocates say that public schools can be “largely inaccessible” for thousands of immigrant students.
One of the largest pushes this year went toward expanding free child care. The city’s public schools will receive just over $12 billion in state funding.
The investment will be spread over four years and could help to stabilize an industry shaken by COVID.
With the end of the school year approaching, NYC schools have spent just about half of this year’s COVID relief, according to a comptroller report.
The pandemic helped drive the state’s decision to scrap the requirement, and follows reforms in recent years to teacher certification in New York.
Mayor Eric Adams wants to give summer jobs to all youth who want one. But undocumented youth can’t participate in the program.
The move immediately brought backlash from labor unions, after Adams said the city is not currently considering changing rules for city workers.
The school will combine JROTC and cybersecurity to ready students for cybersecurity careers as the sector sees a worker shortage.
The largest chunk — about $1.9 billion — will be for an expansion of the city’s pre-K program for 3-year-olds over the next several years.
David Banks noted that the process at some of the city’s coveted “screened” schools is a lottery this year, which has resulted in backlash from parents of students with high grades.