Tell us what you want to read about higher education in Indiana

A young man writes in his notebook, using a mechanical pencil with a blue clip near the eraser.
This year, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education — and we need your help. (Eli Imadali for Chalkbeat)

What’s the value of a college degree in Indiana? What challenges stand in the way of earning one?

Roughly 60% of Hoosier adults don’t have a degree or certificate beyond a high school diploma. That used to not matter as much in Indiana’s old manufacturing economy. But today, state officials and experts alike say those without a higher education are struggling to compete for decent jobs and a livable wage.

This year, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education in partnership with Open Campus — and we need your help.

Our reporting will continue to focus on educational equity, examining how Indiana’s higher education systems serve students of color and students from low-income backgrounds. We will also cover Indiana’s push to offer job training through credentials and certificates, as well as the connection between postsecondary education and workforce development.

Tell us what you’re interested in reading in our higher education coverage by filling out the form below.

Having trouble viewing the survey? Go here.

Stephanie Wang covers higher education for Chalkbeat Indiana, which partners with Open Campus.

The Latest

Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson asked Illinois Senate President Don Harmon in a letter late Thursday to hold a bill that would block changes to selective enrollment schools and prevent any school closures until 2027.

Lawmakers last year relaxed income eligibility rules so that most Indiana families now qualify for the Choice Scholarship program.

Students work with artists to find themselves, learn about their world, and see their work showcased around the city.

El programa capacitará a jóvenes de entre 18 y 24 años para actuar “como navegadores que sirven a estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria en escuelas y en organizaciones comunitarias.”

The teachers union’s 7,000 members are scheduled to take a ratification vote on June 6.

The state superintendent said cuts to staff won’t be prevalent in all districts. But educators say the “fiscal cliff” existed in the state well before federal COVID relief funds.