Tell us what you want to read about higher education in Indiana

A young man writes in his notebook, using a mechanical pencil with a blue clip near the eraser.
This year, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education — and we need your help. (Eli Imadali for Chalkbeat)

What’s the value of a college degree in Indiana? What challenges stand in the way of earning one?

Roughly 60% of Hoosier adults don’t have a degree or certificate beyond a high school diploma. That used to not matter as much in Indiana’s old manufacturing economy. But today, state officials and experts alike say those without a higher education are struggling to compete for decent jobs and a livable wage.

This year, Chalkbeat Indiana is expanding its coverage of higher education in partnership with Open Campus — and we need your help.

Our reporting will continue to focus on educational equity, examining how Indiana’s higher education systems serve students of color and students from low-income backgrounds. We will also cover Indiana’s push to offer job training through credentials and certificates, as well as the connection between postsecondary education and workforce development.

Tell us what you’re interested in reading in our higher education coverage by filling out the form below.

Having trouble viewing the survey? Go here.

Stephanie Wang covers higher education for Chalkbeat Indiana, which partners with Open Campus.

The Latest

The sponsor of the bill says it would create a culture of expectation that formal education must begin early.

Parents, teachers, and others have long criticized the practice of reassigning teachers after the school year has begun. But it’s unclear if ‘leveling’ is gone for good or merely paused.

Lawmakers could revive a plan to let all parents use Education Scholarship Accounts on classes, tutoring, extracurricular activities, and more.

Purdue Polytechnic High School Lab School offers personalized curriculum to around 20 students while getting support from the charter school network.

The plan — which will be finalized this summer — will prioritize improving students’ daily experiences in the classroom, addressing staffing and funding, and collaborating more closely with school communities.

Whether a school is following district discipline rules “is an indicator of the climate of a school,” Superintendent Alex Marrero said.