Where to find free meals for kids in Indianapolis this summer

As part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 2024 Summer Food Service Program, all students ages 18 and under can take advantage of free breakfast and lunch at any participating location. (USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.)

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This article was originally published by Mirror Indy, and is republished through our partnership with Free Press Indiana.

Dozens of schools, community centers and parks are offering free meals to kids across Indianapolis this summer.

As a part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s 2024 Summer Food Service Program, all students ages 18 and under can take advantage of free breakfast and lunch at any participating location regardless of where the student attends school.

Dates and hours for meals vary by location, but each are listed on an interactive map curated by the USDA. Families can also find their nearest location by calling 1-886-3-HUNGRY or 1-877-8-HAMBRE or by texting the words “FOOD” or “COMIDA” to 304-304.

Indianapolis Public Schools shared its list of 12 participating locations early this summer. The sites include school cafeterias as well as an apartment complex, library and community center. All are open Monday through Friday to all students regardless of whether or not they’re an IPS student. Click here to learn more about IPS’ locations.

On the east and west sides, Wayne and Warren township schools also participate in the summer meal program. Wayne’s program runs Monday through Friday from June 10 to July 12. Hours are locations are available on the school district’s website. Warren Township shared dates and locations for its five centers on social media.

Mirror Indy reporter Carley Lanich covers early childhood and K-12 education. Contact her at carley.lanich@mirrorindy.org or follow her on X @carleylanich.

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