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Mila Koumpilova

Senior Reporter, Chalkbeat Chicago

Mila Koumpilova is a Senior Reporter at Chalkbeat Chicago. She previously wrote about higher education and immigration at the Star Tribune newspaper in Minneapolis. Mila has also covered education at the St. Paul Pioneer Press and The Forum in Fargo, N.D. A former North Dakota Rookie Reporter of the Year, she has received recognition from the Education Writers Association, the Minnesota Society of Professional Journalists and others. She is a graduate of the American University in Bulgaria and the Missouri School of Journalism.

District officials say the effort is a key tool to prevent violence and self-harm, but some advocates are skeptical.
The document was required as Chicago gears up to transition to an elected school board.
Some districts in Chicago’s south suburbs stand out for spending small portions of their COVID recovery dollars as reported to the state.
Dolton West’s superintendent wants to use technology to reimagine the school day and week.
Urban Prep leaders blasted the vote by CPS board members and claimed long-standing unfair treatment by the district.
The district is recommending that the school board pull Urban Prep’s charters following reports alleging sexual misconduct and financial issues.
Nearly 83% of students graduated in four years in 2022 and 88.8% of freshmen are on track to graduate, the district said Monday.
Chicago officials voice concerns about slipping NAEP results on the “nation’s report card,” but also highlight bright spots.
Bogdana Chkoumbova, the district’s chief education officer, spoke about her plan to help students bounce back academically.
Career academies, community hubs, incubators for democracy: Chicago Public Schools eyes new models for small South and West Side high schools.
The University of Chicago compared COVID-era grades to those before the pandemic. High schoolers fared better than elementary school students.
Two new student teacher programs at Chicago Public Schools and DePaul University received federal grants aimed at addressing educator shortages.
Prompted by a parent who saw a dumpster full of John Hersey’s “Hiroshima,” National Teachers Academy educators are teaching about the country’s fraught history with nuclear energy.
Chicago schools CEO Pedro Martinez says his efforts to “reimagine” learning in the district will begin with a push to reinvest in neighborhood schools.
Chicago district leaders will face staffing shortages, bus issues, and pandemic-related academic and mental health shortfalls in another high-stakes year.
Advocates for Chicago’s alternative high school students say career training can be a lifeline on second-chance campuses.
The country’s third-largest district is setting out to upgrade its career offerings. It contends with uneven access and little data on student outcomes.
Andie Townhouse discovered yellowing, irrelevant books at the West Side high school’s library. She’s bringing fresh reads — and much more.
Chicago schools CEO Pedro Martinez said his three-year vision for the district encompasses 10 initiatives to usher “the future of education.”
The district has spent about $156.6 million so far on payments to more than 1,000 outside vendors.
New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Boston have more small schools. A budget crunch looms.
Chicago officials said the district provided results to schools early to help plan instruction, but they are still preliminary.
Two Richards Career Academy cousins Chalkbeat Chicago followed through the school year graduate — and reflect on how the pandemic reshaped their post-high school plans.
The budget restored about $24 million in funding, including $14 million for special education following criticism from parent groups, union leaders, and elected officials.
This will be the third year the district will chip in for its employees’ pensions, an expense the city has previously handled.
The district has expanded its pool of classroom assistant subs, but the bulk of requests for backup still go unfilled.
Caucus of Rank and File Educators, which has led the Chicago Teachers Union for a decade, received 56 percent of votes cast.
Chicago Teachers Union members will choose between three leadership slates with very different visions for the coming years.
Some Chicago schools canceled prom last year or hosted smaller events with COVID restrictions. This spring, prom is back with a vengeance.