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Kalyn Belsha

National Reporter

Kalyn Belsha is a National Reporter for Chalkbeat based in Chicago. Previously, she covered education for The Chicago Reporter, Catalyst Chicago and the suburban Chicago Tribune. She is a former Spencer Fellow in Education Reporting at Columbia University and has taught journalism at Loyola University Chicago.

Several big school districts had fewer psychologists or counselors this fall than they did before the pandemic.
Educators and officials in districts that contracted with Paper say its text-based tutoring service often frustrates the students who need the most help.
Researchers say remote learning may be just a “small piece” of what affected students’ academic performance during the pandemic.
A new $10 million initiative will study 31 different in-person and virtual tutoring efforts. The goal is to help schools better invest their time and money.
More schools are beefing up attendance tracking, but many lack the details that would tell them what last year’s absences truly mean.
Federal funding is allowing schools to get creative with how they offer direct help to young people.
Students who struggled before the pandemic are having the toughest time catching up.
Nine-year-olds across the country saw historic drops in math and reading scores on a key national test.
In most cases, students who’ve been exposed to a person infected with monkeypox shouldn’t be excluded from school or other activities.
Many schools are working to plug vacancies, boost student attendance, and address student mental health and academic needs this fall.
Schools can end quarantines and regular screening tests for COVID, new CDC guidelines say.
As more states pass laws restricting lessons about racism and sexism, more teachers worry they’ll face additional scrutiny this school year.
Many principals say it will be very difficult to fill key support staff roles this fall, a new federal survey found.
Some school officials are bracing for a spike in student meal debt as paperwork requirements return.
Schools need to make sure students aren’t being disciplined for behavior related to their disability, especially as the effects of the pandemic drag on, new guidance says.
Many principals reported an uptick in school violence and disruption on a new federal survey, though a sizable portion saw no change from pre-pandemic years.
Las reglas escolares aclaran que las protecciones de la ley de derechos civiles aplican a los estudiantes LGBTQ.
Virtual tutoring companies want to become a more permanent fixture in schools. Their impact so far is unclear.
New federal legislation will help keep school meal programs financially afloat this fall and get more food to kids this summer.
The proposal is the latest step by the Biden administration to strengthen protections for LGBTQ students at school.
At least half of the nation’s 20 largest school districts will offer more full-time virtual schooling this fall than they did before the pandemic.
After the mass shooting in Uvalde, politicians are again calling for more school security. Schools have already spent hundreds of millions in recent years on added security measures.
President Biden urged lawmakers to act after 18 students and a teacher were shot and killed at a Texas elementary school on Tuesday.
After a year in flux, educators hope to double down on academic intervention and set firmer behavior expectations.
Many schools saw an uptick in ninth graders repeating the grade this year. Now educators are trying to step in sooner to help struggling freshmen.
Schools are rearranging furniture, trying new activities, and offering teachers training on ways they can add more speaking practice into their lessons.
An Ohio educator won top teaching honors this week for his work connecting with high schoolers and crafting relevant history lessons.
Some educators have already made changes to lessons about LGBTQ issues because of these new curriculum laws.
Schools and states have faced hiring and scheduling challenges as they launch large-scale tutoring initiatives.
Schools are teetering between optimism and exhaustion two years into the pandemic.