Tell us: As Philadelphia inches toward reopening some school buildings, what are parents and students thinking?

Young girl in mask plays with blocks while masked and gloved woman watches
Chalkbeat Philadelphia wants to hear from families and students at this moment in time. Our short survey will be used to gain insight into what families are experiencing and what questions they may have. We plan to use the results of the survey to inform our coverage. (FatCamera / E+ / Getty Images)

Philadelphia students in prekindergarten to second grade are supposed to head back to classrooms the week of Feb. 22, two weeks after Mayor Jim Kenney unveiled a vaccination plan for teachers and school staff. 

This would be the first time students and teachers have returned physically to a classroom since March — but the school district and the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers are still at odds over the district’s plan to keep educators safe.  

Chalkbeat Philadelphia wants to hear from families and students at this moment in time. Our short survey will be used to gain insight into what families are experiencing and what questions they may have. We plan to use the results of the survey to inform our coverage. Know that this form is confidential and if you are uncomfortable with your name being used, please let us know at the end of the survey.

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