As students return to classrooms, how do you feel about the new school year?

Tell us about your school’s COVID policies and your hopes for the new school year

Students at P.S. 89 in Brooklyn await their families at the end of the school day during the last week of New York City’s 2020-2021 school year.
Students at P.S. 89 in Brooklyn await their families at the end of the school day during the last week of New York City’s 2020-2021 school year. This fall, Chalkbeat wants to hire directly from students, parents, and educators about their hopes and fears for the new school year. (José A. Alvarado Jr. for Chalkbeat)

Students are headed back into classrooms across the nation — many for the first time in more than a year. 

But it’s not just the transition back to daily in-person learning that will prove challenging — there are also contentious debates over masking policies, worries about the more contagious delta variant, and confusing quarantine rules. Teachers are rethinking their own back-to-school routines as they navigate these difficult transitions and conversations. 

At yet another crucial moment, Chalkbeat wants to hear directly from students, teachers, and parents. As school buildings reopen, what are you most nervous and most excited about? What should schools provide to students to support them academically and emotionally this school year? How should districts best spend their federal stimulus money? Your input will help steer and inform our reporting. 

Let us know your thoughts in the form below or go here if you are on a mobile device. We’re always listening at community@chalkbeat.org.

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