COVID and Schools

The share of U.S. schools with more than half of students eating free and reduced-price lunch has dropped from 84% to 69% this year, according to a recent survey.
Students are continuing to regain academic ground lost during the pandemic.
58% of NYC charter schools shrank during COVID, even as the sector grew overall. Two of the city’s major charter networks — Success Academy and Uncommon Schools — saw student enrollment shrink last year.
Charter school enrollment spiked early in the pandemic, then flattened in the 2021-22 school year, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.
Legal experts recommend parents of students with disabilities make a written request to their school districts to schedule IEP meetings about services called “compensatory education” by Dec. 31.
As of this fall, the city had planned to open 55,000 3-K seats, but 15,000 seats are currently unfilled.
There are still many open questions about how both would approach policy for schools.
Facing a budget shortfall because of enrollment declines, Soundview Academy’s principal made an unusual request to students, staff and families: Would they help market the school?
The share of students who were homeless has largely not budged even as public school enrollment has dipped by 9.5% since the pandemic.
The Illinois Tutoring Initiative is expanding to more districts this fall as the state focuses on helping students recover from COVID-19 pandemic. However, funding for the program is set to expire in 2024.
Solving for what was lost during the COVID years sometimes feels impossible.
Grim results come in spite of early pandemic investments in tutoring and summer learning
State test score results show uneven evidence of correlation with learning and in-person instruction.
Amid lagging vaccination, the city’s health commissioner urged Chicagoans to get the new omicron booster to avoid a winter surge.
Researchers say it will take years to catch up; individualized instruction accelerates gains
Candidates hold widely divergent views on charter schools, vouchers, book bans, and third-grade retention
The new tutoring grant is available to fourth and fifth graders who qualify for federally subsidized meals and scored below proficiency on state tests.
The changes are supposed to be reflective of a system that pushes for improvements and support for all students, officials said.
The scores are the first measure of how students across the five boroughs have fared in reading and math since the coronavirus pandemic.
Under New York’s Open Meetings Law, school board meetings must return in person, with an option for hybrid.
The move has prompted mixed reactions from educators and parents.
Seniors strove to serve their community and take on leadership roles while enduring COVID’s impact on learning.
As more young children get vaccinated, Illinois will no longer require unvaccinated school and child care employees to test for COVID twice a week.
Even as New York City required students to return to in-person instruction last school year, hundreds of thousands of children missed large stretches of instruction, new figures show.
Families across the five boroughs are already mounting letter-writing campaigns and petitions for and against schools that use screens for admissions.
After hovering around 45% last spring, the average school is 39% fully vaccinated at the start of the new school year.
Beyond the typical joy and nerves among families and educators, there was a more somber reality: a majority of the city’s schools were starting the year with budget cuts.
What’s happening with the budget? How will schools address mental health? What impact will COVID have this year?
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