What advice do you have for new teachers?

Tell us what you wish you knew before you started teaching. 

Students raise their hands to answer a question.
Whether you are a recent or veteran teacher, Chalkbeat wants to know your advice for new educators. What’s one thing you wish you knew when you first started teaching? What gives you hope right now?  (Elaine Cromie / Chalkbeat)

As students settle into a new school year across the nation, Chalkbeat wants to hear from educators: What do you wish you knew before you started teaching?

The back-to-school season can be an exciting but daunting time, even for veteran teachers. The last few years of pandemic learning have carried immense stress for school communities. More educators have left the profession than normal, according to the best available data, cementing predictions that the pandemic led to more teacher turnover. 

Teachers who have remained are still feeling the lingering effects of pandemic pains: Chronic absenteeism, dipping student test scores, and dwindling federal aid money for recovery programs. But the turn of the calendar year springs new hope for a better season.

Whether you are a recent or veteran teacher, Chalkbeat wants to know your advice for new educators. What’s one thing you wish you knew when you first started teaching? What gives you hope right now? 

Tell us in the form below, or click here to access the form directly. We look forward to hearing from you. 

Caroline Bauman is the deputy managing editor for engagement at Chalkbeat.

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