Vouchers

The 2022-23 school year officially begins Tuesday across the state
Supporters say the program would empower parents, but critics say the scholarships could undermine traditional public schools
Local governments in Nashville and Memphis failed to show that an injunction was warranted, the judges ruled
Speedy voucher rollout draws hopeful families, more legal challenges
Lee meets with private school leaders, while his education chief acknowledges the timeline is ‘challenging’
But the decision won’t turn on a money spigot for religious private schools.
The court order marks another win for Gov. Bill Lee, but more legal challenges loom
With more legal challenges pending, ‘there can’t be any steps going forward,’ Gov. Lee concedes
Cheers, frustrations, and promises to fight follow after Tennessee’s highest court overrules lower courts, clearing an obstacle to the state’s private school voucher law.
The ruling effectively endorses Gov. Bill Lee’s education savings account program, the signature legislation of his first year in office.
The state’s voucher program for students with disabilities could double in size.
A House panel voted 5-4 to defeat a bill that critics said aimed to correct a voucher law overturned by judges.
Critics say it would siphon money from public schools and violate the state constitution.
The proposal would target districts that don’t offer 180 days of annual in-person instruction beginning Sept. 1, 2022
Education is expected to be front and center again — with K-12 funding reform at the top of the list
At stake in the case is the future of school vouchers in Tennessee. Republican Gov. Bill Lee pushed the educational savings accounts, or school voucher law in 2019, as a way for students in Nashville and Memphis to use public funds to pay for private education.
School choice advocates, anticipating the veto from Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, have started a petition drive to circumvent her
With enough signatures, the controversial Opportunity Scholarship program can become law over Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s objections.
Indiana lawmakers added $1.9 billion to school funding, which will help raise teacher pay and also expand private-school voucher for middle-class families
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