What would student debt forgiveness mean to you? Tell Chalkbeat.

Several people walk underneath a grey bridge with the words “University of Colorado” etched into the concrete.
Chalkbeat wants to hear your experiences and questions. We’re especially looking to hear from people who live in or attended school in the state of Colorado. We plan to use the results of the short survey below to inform our coverage. (Cliff Grassmick, The Daily Camera)

Americans owe more than $1.7 trillion in student loan debt, a burden that prevents them from buying houses or even starting families. 

Calls have mounted to cancel student debt. President Joe Biden has suggested he’s open to canceling up to $10,000 in student debt but balked at canceling larger amounts.

Advocates say canceling the debt will stimulate the economy and allow college graduates more economic freedom, especially during a pandemic that’s upended finances for many Americans.

But what does that really mean to the average borrower? Chalkbeat wants to hear your experiences and questions. We’re especially looking to hear from people who live in or attended school in the state of Colorado. We plan to use the results of the short survey below to inform our coverage. If you are uncomfortable with your name being used, please let us know at the bottom of the survey.

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