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Indiana General Assembly

Advocates say a bill to retain third graders could violate the civil rights of 93,000 English learners and conflicts with research on how long it takes to learn a language.

Legislation would establish education on government and good citizenship as early as kindergarten.

A bill that would have dramatically expanded school choice in the state failed to move forward but will likely return in 2025.

But they say more study is needed to find solutions to bring older students back to schools.

The legislation marks the latest effort by state legislators to shape how schools approach topics related to sex and sexuality.

An Indianapolis lawmaker’s bid to increase charter school transparency comes after a federal indictment of former leaders of two virtual schools.

Lawmakers have filed bills on cell phones and other classroom disruptions to deal with teachers’ growing concerns.

One bill would allow public schools could hire chaplains to serve as counselors, while another would require schools to release students for religious instruction at their parents' request.

The bill would mean big changes for Indiana education, but it’s on hold till next year.

The legislation has support from GOP lawmakers and others worried about a recent decline in reading scores.

A new bill would strengthen current requirements for third graders who don’t demonstrate reading skills to repeat a year.

One proposal would let students use the money to pay for driver’s licenses so they can commute to job sites.

The number of Choice Scholarships grew by about 30% following lawmakers’ decision last year to dramatically expand eligibility for the voucher program.

Chalkbeat Indiana is launching a new texting service with updates about bills affecting schools and students.

The legislation follows a Chalkbeat analysis of charter school accountability that found few guardrails for authorizers in state law.

These are the education issues we’re watching in the new year, from the impact of laws governing school choice and the science of reading to big changes at Indianapolis Public Schools.

While lawmakers may seek more enforcement of laws addressing chronic absenteeism, education officials and experts say more nuanced approaches are more effective.

Students now required to fill out the form to access financial aid for college will have less time to do so.

Top Indiana lawmakers said the 2024 session would be more ‘measured’ to allow the sweeping changes of the last two years to take effect.