How I Teach

How do teachers captivate their students? Here, in a feature we call How I Teach, we ask great educators how they approach their jobs.

Follow the teacher’s lesson plan. Form relationships with students. When all else fails, use your acting skills.
Learn your rights. Allow your students a voice. Make available recent young adult books. Fight oppression.
If you decide to leave, coach a mentee to succeed you. Look for ways beyond teaching in a classroom to support school-aged children. Find your next step.
Katherina Lei, a member of Myanmar’s Karen ethnic group, came to the United States as a teenager.
Technology can be your friend. Use help from ELL teachers, students to communicate with families who don’t speak English. Stick to district-approved technology for communication with students.
If you’re new to a school, make friends with teachers and colleagues. Unpack and settle in. Be flexible with change.
Tamir Harper is one of 600 new teachers and counselors working for Philadelphia’s public schools
Consistently alert students and parents to what you expect to prevent problems and establish a healthy work-life balance.
Vote. Use social media to fill classroom needs. Set routines in the classroom. Make every day a fresh start.
Donovan Fountain’s students listen to Croatian rock, Brazilian jazz, and hip hop as part of his music appreciation unit.
Michael Pantone, one of this year’s Big Apple Award winners, teaches theater to students with disabilities at a Brooklyn school in District 75.
Join Chalkbeat on Aug 31, 5-5:45 p.m. ET as Dr. Kem shares her strategies for a successful back-to-school season.
Set professional and personal goals. Find a mentor. Make a date with yourself to follow one of your passions.
Use technology, your school community, and online resources to connect their interests to learning.
It’s harder than ever to juggle all the demands of being a teacher. Advocate for yourself with the administration.
“Young learners are perfectly primed to think about issues of injustice,” Kimi Waite says.
This spring, Upper Peninsula educator Nanette Hanson was named Michigan’s Teacher of the Year for 2022-23. Read how the honoree has prioritized communities and parents during her over 25 years of teaching.
Submit your challenges, frustrations, and teaching questions to our weekly advice column, ‘After the Bell’
Introducing Dr. Kem: Her new weekly Chalkbeat column is the place for teachers to share joys and frustrations (we know you’ve got them!) and get answers to teaching questions.
A weekly column to share joys and frustrations about teaching. Make it your go-to spot for recharging and new ideas.
Sharita Jerkins wants people to know that her students can do anything. That includes dissecting a frog.
Jessica Tavares says students are more willing to try their best when they can be themselves.
Twin Lakes High School teacher Kim Rosenbaum started a “women in welding” class for female teachers, counselors, and administrators.
Christian Young talks about how he brings current events into his lessons, and the advice that he holds on to.
Melanie De Jesus believes her classes help students develop learning and social skills
Principal Sheldon Reynolds talks about leadership, gifted and talented instruction, and his concerns about a new Denver school board policy on innovation schools.
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