How do teachers captivate their students? Here, in a feature we call How I Teach, we ask great educators how they approach their jobs.

Fourth grade math teacher Angela Fowler of Indiana was recently awarded the Milken Educator Award for her work.
Queens teacher Thomas Gelardi’s YouTube channel took off during the COVID pandemic. He’s garnered more than 4 million views on his videos that help kids stay active in small spaces.
The Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol inspired Anne-Michele Boyle to step up her media literacy curriculum.
Stacy Wolff was recently named an Outstanding Environmental Educator by the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education.
Read about inspiring educators in Chicago, Colorado, New York City, Philadelphia, and elsewhere.
Dr. Kem Smith reflects on six months of writing her weekly advice column, “After the Bell.” We hope it has inspired you.
Take care of required things like bathroom procedures first. Use pillows and cushions for alternative seating and decorate with art. Have a place for coats and other personal items.
Sheyla Riaz says mental health support in schools is just as crucial as having academic resources available for students.
Illya Tolbert, the art teacher at Bates Academy in Detroit, says he wants the students he teaches to have exposure to various art forms.
No way! Expose students to grade-level material. Create opportunities for expanded learning using online resources. Seek pandemic funding for additional support.
This veteran preschool teacher spoke with Chalkbeat Philadelphia about teaching preschoolers to share, common misconceptions about early learners, and more.
Set expectations for behavior. Praise students who move away from their phones. Seek parent help for chronic phone users.
You have different teaching styles, but notice the teacher’s positives and trust your colleague. See if you can help solve any problems.
Sarah Slack, a science teacher at Brooklyn’s I.S. 223, won the prestigious Math for America Muller Award for her work on bolstering climate education across New York City.
Practice culturally responsive teaching through classroom leadership. Research your students’ diverse backgrounds and share your own experiences. Create opportunities to help them identify and reach their goals.
For beginning teachers, decide what you value and support students as individuals. Build a community of learners. And, connect with fellow teachers for support.
Be prepared with reference letters, practice your answers, and have real-life examples of classroom problem-solving.
Have students list what’s important to them. Students should do virtual or in-person college tours, seek advice from school counselors, and attend college fairs to narrow their list.
As schools across Illinois bring back activities for students that happened pre-pandemic and protect them from the coronavirus, Jinsun Baek, a school nurse says that it will take balance to have both
Let’s commit to doing a few things to help our sanity. First, take a minute to catch your breath. Remember what is in your control. It’s OK to ask for help.
Be each other’s safe spaces. Collaborate on solutions. Get together outside of school and learn about your colleagues as people.
Follow the teacher’s lesson plan. Form relationships with students. When all else fails, use your acting skills.
Learn your rights. Allow your students a voice. Make available recent young adult books. Fight oppression.
If you decide to leave, coach a mentee to succeed you. Look for ways beyond teaching in a classroom to support school-aged children. Find your next step.
Katherina Lei, a member of Myanmar’s Karen ethnic group, came to the United States as a teenager.
Technology can be your friend. Use help from ELL teachers, students to communicate with families who don’t speak English. Stick to district-approved technology for communication with students.
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