School segregation / integration

Overall, high school applications are down amid declining enrollment, but more students are getting accepted into top-choice schools.
NYC education officials are adding more than 1,000 seats, most of them as new programs that start in third grade. The city’s gifted programs are deeply segregated.
The vote is unlikely to have an immediate impact on school budgets, but delays in approving a formula could hamper principals’ ability to plan and hire staff.
A bill before lawmakers stems from a decade-long dispute after suburban towns seceded from the newly merged Memphis district.
David Banks noted that the process at some of the city’s coveted “screened” schools is a lottery this year, which has resulted in backlash from parents of students with high grades.
Nearly four years after families and advocates filed a lawsuit saying New Jersey schools are unlawfully segregated, a judge is set to decide whether the state must remedy the situation.
A veteran of the Civil Rights Movement and a Newark organizer and historian, Williams spoke about his life and the ongoing fights over Black history and school integration.
A new bill would create a division in the New Jersey education department to study school segregation and propose solutions.
GreatSchools and other rating sites unfairly penalize schools with more students of color, new research finds.
The “diversity in admissions” program launched in 2015 with seven elementary schools, and will total 31 elementary schools across the city as well as all of those in Manhattan’s Lower East Side/East Village District 1 for the coming school year.
NYC high schools were slated to remove all admissions priorities based on where students live, but Mayor Bill de Blasio said he is “still reviewing” the decision.
The neighborhood where students live — not just where they go to high school — plays a major role in whether they complete a college degree.
The gifted test is one policy blocking students’ from their constitutional right to a “sound, basic education,” according to a lawsuit filed earlier this year.
Much of the school integration work happening around the city is just parents and educators spinning their wheels.
Students in some of Manhattan’s wealthiest ZIP codes no longer have a leg up in local selective schools. This year, those schools offered more seats to students from low-income families.
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